Hobbyist Forums banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,598 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Since I enjoyed working on my "Redphin" '59 Chevy a month or so ago, I did up a few more last night-

The '78 Camaro:




The '70 Camaro:




The Falcon XB:




Let me know what you think, and if you have any tips or pointers for a newbie to the word of Hot Wheels customizing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,806 Posts
Looks great! Not sure if you do or not , but before putting red on the taillights, hit them with silver first. Then put the red over that. Makes them pop a bit more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,454 Posts
If you were a dirtbag, you would put it back in the original package and call it an error. LOL. Just saying.

Looks good with out all the designs and tampos.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,598 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Looks great! Not sure if you do or not , but before putting red on the taillights, hit them with silver first. Then put the red over that. Makes them pop a bit more.
Thanks for the compliment and the suggestion. I've been doing that sort of thing on te 1:25 plastic models I build for years. Before I install the taillight lenses (if they're not mounted in chrome housings), I back them up with Bare Metal foil. On these, I hit the area with aome silver paint. My hand isn't steady enough to try to cut those itty-bitty little scraps of foil! I wanted to do the back-up lights on the Camaros with a dab of white, but my white paint is dried up... :(

If you were a dirtbag, you would put it back in the original package and call it an error. LOL. Just saying.

Looks good with out all the designs and tampos.
Thanks for your compliment too - I guess it's a good thing I'm not a dirtbag! Nah, I do this for my own enjoyment. The only error I have is a Hot Wheels Classic '70 Chevelle on a '62 Bel Air Bubbletop card.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
146 Posts
Sweet cars. Just so you know- it's an '81 Camaro, not a '78. The details tell the difference. It has the 80/81 style fender vents, as well as the lower grille.

If it had the stock hood it would have the 80/81 specific air induction hood scoop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,598 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
A whole better. Maybe I missed it but are you using a paint pen or sharpie?
Primarily, both. I like the Sharpie for the silver but the paint pen for the black. The taillights are Testors "Stoplight Red", and the front turn signals are Testors "Turn Signal Amber". Both are translucent colors, so they really pop when over a silver base coat. I want to try red and orange or yellow Sharpies some time for the lights. If they don't work out well enough, I can always go back to the brush paints.

Sweet cars. Just so you know- it's an '81 Camaro, not a '78. The details tell the difference. It has the 80/81 style fender vents, as well as the lower grille.

If it had the stock hood it would have the 80/81 specific air induction hood scoop.
Thanks for the complment and the correction! I DID know that. You're right, of course - I should have paid attention to those pesky fender vents. I didn't even bother looking at the year on the card, just the bumpers on the car itself. Since they aren't those horrendous aluminum patios the 1974-77 cars had, I just went with the next year, when Chevy finally fixed them. Personally, I still prefer the 1970-73 style, but the 1978-81 is worlds better than the atrocious mid-70's models! The smoother looking 1980-81 Z-28s are, to me, the best of the later 2nd-gen Camaros.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,425 Posts
Maybe I missed it but are you using a paint pen or sharpie?
My question exactly. If I ever get around to detailing some cars, I'll get some Testors Chrome Silver and, when my hand steadies enough, apply it with a fine paint-brush. The bigger areas, like lights and grilles, would be better off masked and then painted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,598 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I mask anything that needs it, like the tail panels on the '81 Camaro and the Falcon, and the spoiler on the front of the '70 Camaro. I find the silver Sharpie to be a lot more controlable around details like window reveals than a 10-0 paint brush would be. I've been using that technique for several years on the 1:25 plastic models I build when the model is of a car that's supposed to be several years old and somewhat weathered-looking and Bare Metal foil would look too shiny.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,324 Posts
I'm curious about paint pens myself, but I've never wanted to spring the money for them at the local craft shop. The regular red Sharpie pens work very well for taillights, especially on bare metal. The orange is sometimes too orange for amber lights. The less you put on, the better. The black is good, but not as black as I would prefer. It dries as a very dark, inky purple.

For silver, I highly recommend the Sanford Silver Coat metallic marker. It's brighter than Sharpie silver, and leaves the appearance of brushed or unpolished metal. Sharpie silver has it's place though, because it happens to be a perfect match for some of the silver paint that Johnny Lightning uses in place of "chrome". And don't underestimate plain old Scotch tape. It works for masking if you apply it with a strong thumb.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,598 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I'm curious about paint pens myself, but I've never wanted to spring the money for them at the local craft shop. The regular red Sharpie pens work very well for taillights, especially on bare metal. The orange is sometimes too orange for amber lights. The less you put on, the better. The black is good, but not as black as I would prefer. It dries as a very dark, inky purple.

For silver, I highly recommend the Sanford Silver Coat metallic marker. It's brighter than Sharpie silver, and leaves the appearance of brushed or unpolished metal. Sharpie silver has it's place though, because it happens to be a perfect match for some of the silver paint that Johnny Lightning uses in place of "chrome". And don't underestimate plain old Scotch tape. It works for masking if you apply it with a strong thumb.
I'll have to get one of those Sanford silver metallic markers. I haven't been 100% satisfied with the silver Sharpie so far although it's easier to use by far than the Testors paint marker on 1:64 cars. I guess the results you get from the black Sharpie all depend on how you prep the surface. I make sure the surface is completely clean and free of contaminants. I wash the car down with soap and water and a toothbrush after polishing it before doing any paint work. So far mine have come up looking black to me. As for the orange Sharpie, I'll give it a shot. I have a couple of ideas as to how to use the "too orange" situation to my advantage by using shading techniques and diffeent base coats under the orange.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,324 Posts
I've also used a mix of Sharpie orange and yellow with so so results. A silver base is definitely a must for the orange. It doesn't look so dark then.

The Sharpie black looks black enough. It has only purplish highlights at a certain angle in the bright light. The Sanford silver pen is the kind you shake, with a felt tip that depresses. So you have to pay careful attention not to put too much on. But it's a good pen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,598 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Thanks! I'm having fun doing them, not to mention that I see the results so much faster than I do when building my kit-based models.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top