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Discussion Starter #1
Hello Everyone,

Just wondering what anyone could recommend for a new airbrush as I'm looking into acquiring a new one.

I have found the Grex Tritium TG3 and the Iwata Neo TRN1 which I like the look of.

I'm liking the Grex Tritium TG3 as there are a lot of extras I could acquire making it a really good brush, like the new fan spray pattern heads. Only thing is the price, but I guess you get what you pay for.

Just wondering on what people would consider and why.

Thanks

William
 

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I bought a Grex Tritium on the spot at an IPMS show here a couple years ago as an impulse purchase after demoing the gun at the show. BEST control airbrush I have seen, hands down, and I have been airbrushing for almost 40 years. I've used Badgers, Iwatas, Paasche and Testors brushes and even an old Binks Wren. The Grex gravity feed is so easy to use and control, and the trigger grip is easy on the hand.

That doesn't mean the other brushes or brands aren't good, they are, or can be. But, the Grex is good and worth the money IMHO. The thing is too, if you have to buy a couple cheaper brushes to get what you want, then you have paid for the Grex in the first place.

Having said that, I also use an Iwata Revolution with the fine needle and tip added to replace the larger ones that come in the package. It's a fine airbrush for general use.

Downside to the Grex is that getting parts is a little harder than other brands. It's not obscure, but you can't get parts at Hobby Lobby or your local arts and craft store, who will sell Badger, Paasche and Iwata parts. Also, parts are not cheap. A new needle and spray tip (very fragile on the Grex because the tip is exposed) will set you back $60. A Badger needle and tip will run you all of $15.

I don't have direct experience with the Iwata Neo brushes but it is my understanding that the Neo line is their budget series, and the brushes are not actually made by Iwata but are just rebranded by them for the Neo line. For what it's worth, Iwata-Medea does make the Tamiya HG series of metal airbrushes. They are similar to but not identical to various Iwata brushes on the market. I needed a new spring for my Iwata Revolution and was able to use the same part from a Tamiya HG.

I would also add that, if you purchase a Grex or any other better quality brush, pay attention to your air supply. A Grex is useless without a half way decent compressor with an adjustable air supply. If you use a fixed pressure, piston compressor or cans of air, don't waste your money on a high end airrush because with a fixed air pressure you won't get any benefit from features of the brush you cant use.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the information in your replay djnick66, this will help me a bit in my quest on what i do. I'm still working on what way to go but yeah will keep thinking, i use a hoe handy mans compressor so air pressure and adjustment is no problem, it's just about getting the right combo for my paint and spraying style.

Anyway thanks again
 

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I use an Iwata Revolution along with my Grex. They are NOT in the same league when it comes to micro fine detail and control, but the Revolution is a good standard brush. If you get the fine needle and spray tip, it does quite well. Out of the box the larger needle and tip were not that useful unless you were doing larger or one color paint schemes.
 

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I have an Iwata Eclipse and like it a lot, but the side-feed cup can be a bit fussy. It gives you a better view of what you're painting, but the cup it comes with really isn't big enough, so I bought a larger one that works a lot better. I tried a Grex at Wonderfest and was intrigued, but I'm a bit worried about the exposed tip.
 

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Check out Paul Budzik's site
http://paulbudzik.com/tools-techniques/Airbrushing/airbrushing_for_modelers.html
and the links there to his YouTube videos. A lot of great information there.
His explanation of paints is the best reference you could have when choosing the kind of tool you need:
http://paulbudzik.com/tools-techniques/Airbrushing/paint.html
The airbrushes I like and why I use them are around this photo here:
http://s1004.photobucket.com/user/j...ools/IMG_1004_zpsdltz2jrb.jpg.html?sort=3&o=4
 

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A couple of things:

The Iwata Revolution comes with a .5mm needle/nozzle and is designed to spray from 1/32 to 2 inches. Great for general coverage and metallics. As stated above, you can upgrade to a .35mm setup with 3 parts.

The Iwata Eclipse comes with a .35mm needle/nozzle and will do pencil-thin lines up to 1.5 inches. Very versatile brush (my workhorse - use it about 85% of the time). It also has a floating nozzle which is very easy to clean. You can also change to a .5mm setup with 3 parts.

The Neo gravity feed comes with a .35mm setup and the bottle feed comes with a .5mm setup. Designed for new users that don't want to spend a lot of money, they are surprisingly good airbrushes.

Disclaimer - We get along very well with the Grex boys and their products are on par. BTW - we also carry a line of 'trigger' airbrushes (Trigger Neo's and Rev's).

If you have any questions about either line of airbrushes, recommend talking to Tom Grossman at Tag Team Hobbies http://www.tagteamhobbies.com/

Rob
Iwata Padawan
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks

Thanks everyone for your information.

This has given me a bit to think about and will now have to weight up the pros and cons and cost and everything.

Anyway thanks again.
 

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You know, one additional thing to consider is your air source. An airbrush is only as good as the air supply. The best high end brush will give mediocre performance if you are using cans of air or a fixed pressure, piston compressor. A smooth air flow, adjustable compressor is the way to go. Even a shop tank compressor does the trick (although they are large and noisy).
 

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I've been using my Iwata HP-CH this week on a couple of busts.
It has a very smooth action and an adjustable air-flow valve for effects like spatter.
It came in handy for me this week on my projects.
But I have used Badger's Krome and the Harder-Steenbeck successfully too.
All three can do fine line detail. The Krome gives me good over-all coverage.
But in terms of sensitivity and getting the airbrush to do exactly what I want the H&S and the Iwata have the smoothest actions.

Derek
 

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As stated above, you can upgrade to a .35mm setup with 3 parts.
WillheG,

Something else you should consider is where you're going to airbrush. Paint fumes and overspray are genuine hazards - even from acrylic paints. If you're going to be painting indoors, a spray booth with protect you and your family from overspray, toxic fumes, and - if you're using oil-based paints and solvents - fire hazards. You can build your own booth or get a commercial item; I've been using a Pace spray booth for years. No spray booth is cheap, but what are your lungs worth?


Rob,

I have the Revolution CR, which you'll recall you sold me at the iHobby Expo a couple year back. I love the thing, but I didn't think it could accept the smaller needle and tip. Am I wrong?
 

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Wow. I have been out of the loop too long. I had a Paasche set. The red one with red/blue striped hose. It did the job. I had a Scott-Fetzer compressor. All this new stuff is overwhelming! Myself, if I had to do it today, I'd go for the FS Set:



YMMV

Doug
 

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I second the recommendation of a Pace spray booth. No they aren't cheap, but then what is your health worth? And keeping your work area tidy.... Like any tool, you get what you pay for. You can buy small, cheap, plastic, spray booths that are small, don't have a fan big enough to move a lot of air and particulate, or are hard to clean because they are plastic... or you an buy a good all metal Pace booth and be done with it.

I was at the LHS the other day and a customer had purchased a Paasche VL set. He was having some problems with the brush and the shop owner and I gave him some hints and tips and suggestions. He had never used a brush before.... A couple days later he came back in with a completed 1/48 A-10 Warthog with a very competently done 3 tone camoufalge all done freehand with his new brush. So, he went from not ever using an airbrush before, to having some big issues and problems (not knowing how to adjust things, thin paint, clean the brush) to turning out a fairly respectable first effort - all in a few days.
 
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