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Discussion Starter #1
I'm building the GEOMetric resin kit of Charles Laughton's turn as our favourite bell ringer, but I'd like to add a name plate to my kit - anyone know where I can get one? I see that Posthumous Productions makes one, but I can't find a website or URL to contact them (other than what's posted on Buc's site, which only has a snail mail addy). Cult sells the replacement head (for the Aurora/PL kit) + name plate, but not separately.

Naturally, I'm trying to finish this for W'fest and time is of the essence :roll:
 

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You might try Fritz Frising, aka Headless Hearseman on eBait, he sometimes handles nameplates.
 

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step 1: find or make the graphic that you want on the nameplate, including a border around it. print it out at the size you wish in black and white at 300 dpi.

step 2: go to your local print shop with your print out and ask for a "read-right" rubber stamp without the handle to be made from it. ("read-right" means that the design isnt flipped into a mirror of the design like regular rubber stamps are.) what you'll get back is a rubber version of your nameplate

step 3. look here on the forums for the directions for molding and casting small parts. make a small silicone mold, cast in resin, and youve got it!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I searched the forumns, but I'm a little worried about using epoxy putty or Durham's to cast a flat nameplate with intricate surfaces (little triangle in the A, for example).

The stamp came back today and looks great - it's made from a flexible polymer, so I'll need to make sure it's on a flat surface before casting.

Should I just paint this stamp directly? Does anyone know if rubber accepts paint?
 

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Ross, I bet you can color the stamp with acrylic model paint. I don't know how long the stamp will hold up, though - rubber tends to deteriorate over time. On the other hand, the painted stamp would likely last until WonderFest and until such time as Posthumous Productions runs off another batch of Hunchback nameplates.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks Mark! The material is some kind of polymer, so it might hold up better than rubber. I guess I need to glue it to a piece of plastic to make it rigid and give the painting a shot.
 

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Ross (and razorwyre),

This sounds like a cool idea - you guys mind sharing the price you paid for your stamps? Ross, please let us know how the painting gambit works out, for better or for worse. And don't forget to post pics of the results!
 

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Wait a minute. IF you're using the stamp to cast a mold and then make the nameplate, why paint the stamp ?? Or if you are casting a mold from the stamp and the stamp reads "the right way", won't the final casting come out backwards ?? Or are you just using the stamp itself as the final nameplate??
 

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Mark McGovern said:
Dabs,

As I understand it, the "read-right" stamp is the nameplate, because the image is not reversed. It's just a quick and (I hope) cheap way to get a 3-D nameplate made from 2-D artwork.
yes exactly. i wonder about using the stamp as the plate itself because the polymer its made from is specially designed so that while ink will stick to it for a moment, long enough to make the imprint on paper, the ink WONT stick to it and build up long term. in fact, theres not much that does like to stick to it. thats why i advised making an rtv mold and a resin casting of it.

using read right stamps is a very old product designers trick. im fairly certain that most of the after market nameplates out there are done that way, not to mention other things. several years ago i designed a licensed "tales from the crypt" clock, showing the cryptkeeper holding his big book, where the book cover was the clockface. the entire cover was one big read right stamp incorporated into the sculpture. that made it easy to make sure that the numbers were in the proper places and add the logo.

by the way, if anyone is thinking of using a stamp as a mold for a nameplate, remember that it has to be flopped left to right as well as being mirror-imaged.

a read right stamp, depending on the size, shouldnt run you any more than about $20... and thats for a big one. remember too that there are sometimes technical difficulties with large black areas on stamps.
 

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razorwyre1 said:
...I wonder about using the stamp as the plate itself because the polymer its made from is specially designed so that while ink will stick to it for a moment, long enough to make the imprint on paper, the ink WONT stick to it and build up long term. in fact, theres not much that does like to stick to it. thats why i advised making an rtv mold and a resin casting of it.
Thanks for the info and $$$ estimate, raze. I once spoke on the telephone for quite a while with John Apgar of Posthumous Productions. He said that the masters for his nameplates are photoetched brass. The photoetching kits that I've seen in the Micro Mark catalog don't come cheap, so twenty bucks or less sounds like a baragin when you're only making a couple of nameplates a year.

That's especially true if you economize by using latex silicone adhesive or Mountains In Minutes to make the molds and two-part epoxy to make the nameplate itself (Alumilite products are better, but far more expensive and have a limited shelf life). I've even used modeling clay as a mold for very simple items like ears.
 

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Hey, I'd say if it's a kit that comes without a nameplate and enough guys on the forum have it you could sell a few copies and recoup your outlay ??
 

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the Dabbler said:
Hey, I'd say if it's a kit that comes without a nameplate and enough guys on the forum have it you could sell a few copies and recoup your outlay ??
Makes sense to me, Dabs - in fact, I've got one that some of you guys might be interested in right now. Who's up for my officially-licensed "Scott's Speedygreen Drop Spreader - 1/144 Scale" plate?
 

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So YOU'RE the one who scarfed them all up ?? !! No wonder I couldn't find any.
I been using this stinkin hand lettered cardboard one.
 

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Mark McGovern said:
Dabs,

I am truly sorry to hear that A: there even is a 1/44 scale model of a Scott's Speedygreen Drop Spreader and B: that you have one.

Mark McPitying
HA ! I've often said I have eclectic taste in models. I actually have the very rare GK REFIT spreader limited edition with the high tension ginion pin and modified knuten valve complete with after market gutta purcha handles.
 
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