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I know an enclosed cabinet is best.I find that it`s more then just dust.It has a sort of greasiness to it.What items do you use to clean them with & how often do you clean them? I know one thing.Never let your wife do it or oopsy!!
 

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I load them in my truck and drive them through a car wash :thumbsup:
Mcdee
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I load them in my truck and drive them through a car wash :thumbsup:
Mcdee
I usually try blowing the dust off them out on my balcony then lightly washing them under the bath tub tap but that hard to see greasy film still lingers.Maybe it`s just the big city that causes that problem.Some use compressed air but all your really doing is putting that same dust back in your room.
 

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UV light shows dust like nothing else. Hold a black light close to your model and it will reveal any dust on the surface.

Use a very soft duster, soft sable brush, Q-tips, tack cloth, or even compressed air (lightly).
 

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Laird of Dunans Castle
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I use a badger-hair shaving brush to gently dust the kits...it's soft so it won't gouge the kit and gets into the nooks and crannies...
 

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I keep most of mine in their original box and wrapping. Dust is not a problem for those. :thumbsup:

Ones that I've built, I keep behind glass, and then use cans of pressured-air to blow the dust off about twice a year.

g,
 

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I know an enclosed cabinet is best. I find that it`s more then just dust. It has a sort of greasiness to it. What items do you use to clean them with & how often do you clean them? I know one thing. Never let your wife do it or oopsy!!
That "greasiness" could be from cooking. The stuff hangs in the
air, and fills the house. Then, it settles on your models.
If kitchens had a door like they're supposed to, this wouldn't
happen. But, we're all forced to live with this "Great Room" concept.
 

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I use a badger-hair shaving brush to gently dust the kits...it's soft so it won't gouge the kit and gets into the nooks and crannies...
What?!? You can buy brushes for shaving....no...better not....

Chris.:)
 

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For what it's worth...

Wait...you're supposed to clean them???

hahahahahahah I love that

Yep.

What I did 3 months ago (and the models are still standing):

Mine were covered with smoke film (no comments please; I'm not quitting and that's THAT) so in a ventilated room (my kitchen sink) I get to work. This is a radical cleaning, done once every five years or so...
(Quarterly cleaning is done with a really fat water colour brush and an air brush compressor)

Tools:

Straight Ammonia in a spray bottle (hence the needed ventilation)

An aerator/spray attachment on your kitchen faucet (or get yer butt downstairs to the laundry tub, which is what the significant other is going to tell you anyway)

A vacuum cleaner that you can reverse (move the hose from the front to the back so that it blows rather than sucks. I have a Kirby upright. And make sure the dirt bag is disconnected! I just thought of Curly! Nyuk Nyuk

A crevice attachment on the end of the hose. This reduces and channels the airflow so that you don't blow the models apart, or to the other end of the continent.

The Work:

Spray the model with the ammonia. If you can wear one of those medical masks for breathing, better.

Invert the model under the lightly running faucet to rinse. This is kind of like doing a really delicate set of dishes...

Use the blower-vacuum to dry. Should be about a foot and a half away. Done.

The concerns:

I thought the ammonia might eat off some of the paint (since a lot of them are acrylic paint) but it didn't. So there. I wouldn't try this with a really fresh paint job, it probably hasn't cured yet. Just being cautious.

I sometimes use my airbrush compressor for drying, but the vacuum has more horse power to it. Just go easy with it or you'll blow the model apart (Dracula for instance; has a lot of intricate fiddly parts to it. And that CAPE! Oy!) Keep your distance.

There may be some residual water run-off (these are hollow models after all) but so what? It's only water after all, if you have rinsed properly.

Wow! Did they ever come out nice! The Polar Lights Phantom looked like he was getting a suntan with all the Nicotine film. After, he went back to his old pale self. All he needed was a bath.

Me too, come to think of it.

I hope this helps. If not, sorry. Worked for me. At the very least, you've had something to read for the last 5 minutes.

John
 

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Oxidation Genius
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Once every month (or three), I dust them off with a shaving brush (for larger areas), a soft 1" or 1/2" watercolor brush (for smaller models), and a spray can of air (for inside cockpits and such). I don't get the greasy effect mentioned - I guess the models are far enough from the kitchen.

While I'm doing it, I clear a shelf off at a time and dust & Windex the shelf too.

Unfortunately total dust-freeness is not usually possible because some traces of dust cling. Washing is the only answer, but I'm just not willing to do that with hundreds of models that have fine antennae and delicate landing gear.

btw, A friend of my father's once came home to find that his wife had come up with a novel way to clean his models. She filled the bathtub with soapy water, dumped them all in, and swished them around. It wasn't a pretty sight.
 

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Display cases for me. The smaller car models get the ready made model cases. The larger models, I'll build acrylic cases. You can get a sheet of acrylic for about $15 at Home Depot and make a box out of it. Use Pro Weld or Weld On to glue it together. Easier to dust the cases than the models.
 

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Lifetime Monster Modeler
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That "greasiness" could be from cooking. The stuff hangs in the
air, and fills the house. Then, it settles on your models.
If kitchens had a door like they're supposed to, this wouldn't
happen. But, we're all forced to live with this "Great Room" concept.
You are not a smoker, are you....wonder if that is what some of the build-up grime might be...

MMM
 

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I've got a big watercolor brush that I use. As was pointed out though, it really just knocks the dust off so I have to take them outside to do it. I don't have many built kits so that isn't too much of an issue. Now my hundreds of Japanese vinyl toys is another story... :freak:
 
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