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Discussion Starter #1
The Hot Set-Up

For our ovals here’s the hot set up, or at least the current one that is making the competition go nuts.

Starting with a basic (new) X-Traction car, the car is completely disassembled and cleaned, all lubricants are removed. The original tires are removed and the mandated Tyco 440X2 #545 front tires are installed on the stock rims. Supertires #391 silicones are installed on the rear and the Aero-Wheels cover is placed on the outside of the wheel. Making the Aero Cover is easy; simply stamp out a circle of .010 plastic using a hand held hole punch, the size is perfect. The blade guide pin is removed (our rules don’t allow blades) and a Super G+ guide pin used to replace it. This puts a lot more guide pin in the slot and will require the pick-up shoes to have to be replaced with BSRT Gold Plated Ski shoes. We’ve found that lowering the car the few millimeters that this tire combination does causes the OEM pick-ups to hang up on the track rails in the corners sometimes, this solves that problem. Silver plated shoe springs replace the OEM springs.



The OEM magnets are replaced by BSRT zapped magnets for the Magna-Traction cars. The zapped magnets are only $3.00 compared to $15.00 for the polymers, and actually work better on the tracks we run on. The polymers just generate so much torque that the cars break loose accelerating out of the corners and are more prone to spins. Recent races found that the two polymer cars won only 2 of the 10 races because of spins or crashes. The stock arm is balanced using the razor blade method and Hi-Pro motor brushes with silver brush springs are then installed. The plastic idler gear on the gear plate is replaced with a brass one and pure silicone oil is used to lube the gears and armature shaft boss in the chassis.



Since the car isn’t a polymer car you don’t need to add any accessory weight, and we no longer allow cars to have new machined chassis. The rules state that if you have an old A/FX chassis that is lightened then it will be allowed but will be marked permanently, and if ever destroyed it will not be replaced with another machined chassis. X-Traction chassis are not allowed to be machined (and really don’t need to be).

The body is a standard AMG Eagle but the rules state that only the body be painted, there is no mention of painting the wing. Also a minimal amount of decals will be used, only the nose number will be run, nothing else. The paint is a single coat of airbrushed Pactra white RC paint, also meant to be very light. The car is cut close to the track and around the frame for a good air seal.



Single lap times are a few hundredths off the polymer cars in qualifying, the fastest polymer car running a 1.928 to a 1.993 for a zapped car. But the zapped cars run cooler in races of 50 laps or more and seem stronger at the end.

This is our hot set up.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
"Skipper" Green Scorches Sequoia

"Skipper" Green Scorches Sequoia





Well, so much for the paint and decal theory. Scott "Skipper" Green's Canon Ferrari/Eagle just scorched a 1.897, more than a tenth below the current track record. The zapped/mean green X-Traction ran the lap with "just" 20.8 volts, the track record was set with a 22 volt power pack. Sequoia is as yet unfinished, and the record will stand until the track goes to G-Jet power next month.
 

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Pete thanks for posting this. It comes at a perfect time for me.

Could you tell me where to get the silver plated springs? both for the shoes and brushes.

thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I got mine from Scale Auto quite a while ago, maybe two or three years. They were made by Pro-Tech I believe but I don't see that they still offer them. You might be able to still find them from another source.

I also have a friend that has one of those electroplating set-ups, the kind you see for $69.95 in the back of Popular Science. I've had him do some platinum plating for me of pickup shoes because of the durability of platinum. Even at the thickness he plates them they seem to last forever. I'm not sure how that affects the electrical resistance of the part but it is a good conductor so I assume it helps. However $10 for a pair of pick up shoes is out of most peoples reach regardless of how long they will last. But back to the topic, if you can find someone with a set-up like that, like a car detailing shop, they can plate your stuff for you fairly cheap.
 
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