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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
hey guys, ive recently added power supplies to each lane on my tracks.my controllers are getting hot and smell burnt.one track runs 17 volts @ 1 1/2 amps and the other 23 volts @ 2 amps.i run old and new cars.im confused on all the ratings of controllers . whats the characteristics of say a 15 ohm compared to a 40 ohm.please help explain these controllers. thanks bruce
 

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The controllers that come with track will not withstand heavy duty usage.
(As you are finding out...)
There are many different types of controllers out there. What do you run and do you forsee running different types (or even scales...) of cars in the future?
BTW, controllers that do not come with the set will require some wiring skills to enable them to be used with your track.
And here is a mail list to subscribe to where you find all sorts of slotcar minded people...
http://spies.com/mailman/listinfo/ho-slotcars
Scott
 

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Ohms for Different Slots

Definitely, get yourself some Parma Controllers and depending on what you're running will decide what ohm resistors you will want. For regular magnet cars (Tyco/Mattel, Tomys, Liflikes) 45 ohms does the trick. For Afx Magnatraction and Aurora tjets, 60-75 ohms works well. For Tuff-Ones (Aurora or JL), and some fray cars, you'd want to go to HO World and get some 90 or 120 ohm resistors.

Best to first try a friends controller, or rent one at a local track to see which ohms resistors feel good to you.

Here's a link that searches for Parma Controllers . HTH
 

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Also keep in mind that the best controller depends heavily on the track configuration and to some extent how you setup your car. On a decent sized commercial track with lots of long straights a I use a 25 OHM for most magnet cars. In my basement I can use 45 OHM for just about everything including JL TJets, but most folks prefer an 80-120 OHM resistor for the JL TJets. Once you get into needing 3 or more different rated controllers it's time to consider going to an electronic controller. Try test driving one of the less expensive electronic controllers like the Professor Motor models if you can. Parma has an electronic controller too but I've never heard anyone say whether it works well for HO or not. I tried one and it seemed to work okay, but the sensitivity adjustments didn't seem to have any effect at all. The sky is the limit on the pricing of electronic controllers.

Finally, there's more to controllers than just the OHM rating. Look at the construction quality too. The Parma Plus (or Turbo) controller costs almost twice as much as the Econo model ($45 vs. $25) but it is a better design, both mechanically and electrically. But even the Econo is infinately better than the controllers that come with the race sets.
 

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So I guess I'll need 3 sets of controllers to cover each class/manufacturer I run on my track. Don't think the Resource Manager is going to buy this, she's still trying to understand why I need more than four cars to run. Hell, you only have a four lane set. :freak: ;) rr
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yea, its gettin to be a little spendy so i got a part time gig at the go-kart track.Now she says im never home anymore.Wife is gettin into the scenery and hand making buildings tho so theres hope. thanx for da info bruce
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
so if im understanding all this correctly 25 ohms for hi- speed with lots of straights, 45 will run most cars and use a higher ohm rating for the older cars ?is one able to take the old controllers and spin some copper around the post to change the resistance. im a gonna try it.thanx again.
 

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"So I guess I'll need 3 sets of controllers to cover each class/manufacturer I run on my track."
This would probably be cost prohibitive. Electronic controllers allow you to adapt the controller to the various track, motor, power, traction, gearing, wiring setup, etc., conditions that affect how easily and efficiently you can drive the car. Most electronic controllers can be adjusted to replace the need for several resistor based controllers. Electronic controllers start around $60 and go well beyond $300.

Resistor based controllers (set controllers, classic Parma controllers, etc.) are inexpensive but are always a compromise. However, a lot of people can adapt their driving style to be able to run quite well with standard resistor controllers, especially if they pick a good compromise resistor value. The resistance ratings you see here are well known good compromise values for common types of cars and track conditions.

All unmodified resistor controllers are basically the same. At minimum throttle you have the maximum resistance of the controller and at full throttle you have near zero resistance (a short). The resistor rating tells you the range of control you have between these extremes at the wiper arm of the controller. So a 45 ohm resistor gives you 45 ohms of variability and a 90 ohm gives you 90 ohms of variability. The amount of current that gets to the track rails is inversely proportional to the amount of resistance at the wiper arm. So assuming the resistors both have evenly spaced windings (and a power supply that's not current limited), the 45 controller will deliver approximately twice as much current to the track as will the 90 ohm controller set at the same wiper arm position.

Different cars have different current requirements. That's why you'd like to match the controller to the needs of the car and the other factors. The JL TJets don't need a lot of current to run fast due to the armature windings and numerically higher gearing, so a JL with a lower ohm controller will make the thing take off with little movement of the controller wiper arm. That tends to make the car more difficult to control, unless of course you have long straights and wide sweeping turns that allow you to maintain a fairly high speed and your don't mind the lack of variability in controlling the car.

As far as winding your own control resistor with copper wire goes... plan to get a lot of copper wire. The resistance of copper is pretty low so you'll need a lot of windings to achieve the resistance ratings you'll need. Assuming 30 gauge copper wire, you'll need about 7.5 feet of wire per ohm. Do the math. ;-) The wire used on wire wound resistors has a much higher resistance than copper. I think it's nichrome or a similar alloy.
 

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Hi Doc :wave:
I went thru the same deal youre goin thru, and tried several different controllers, and I finally wound up with Prof. Motors, for my track. I already owned a few parmas (econo & turbo) from my USRA days, many many moons ago, tried them with dif. resistors, and (personal preference) liked the Prof. Motor best. I do agree with the others that said go to your local raceway and try different ones. Everyones "feel" is different. I run mainly Aurora & JL T jets and A/FX / X-Tractions. Greg Brauns website; HO Slot Car Racing . com has several easy to folllow wiring diagrams to be able to hook up Commercial controllers to a "home" track. My track is a 70 ft per lap 4 lane, on a 4X16 table. The local raceway as a 53 ft 6 lane track. One note, I dont race magnet (Tomy, Tyco, Patriot, etc) style cars, and only have a few that others play with. Call me old school, but please dont think I am "slammin" those type cars, I just had more T-Jets and A/FX when I got back into HO racin a few years back. Any of the controller choices, Parma, Prof.Motor,,Nitro, will work fine, but, if you can, try before you buy. From what the gang here local uses, ohm wise, its anywhere from 60 to 120 resistors in a Parma. Here again, its what feels good to you.

HTH
Larry
 

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The Professor Motor Controllers http://www.professormotor.com/
are well talked about on one of the other boards I visit.
http://pub83.ezboard.com/fpockitfrm4

I have not used one and I do not have one.
Please try to find different types of controllers to use before you spend the money...
I have borrowed $250 DiFalcos and $300 Omnis.
They are wonderful controllers if you can get past the price....
One tip for electronic controllers. Spend the money to get dual polarity and make sure that it will work without a brake wire on the track...
I have been tempted to buy a Prof. Motor but what can I say... I want to try before I buy.
Scott
 

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Expensive Variable Resistance Controllers

Jon,
I noticed on your Hobby Talk Bulletin Board a thread on Controllers. The link below is for Mickey Hurtado of SoCal. He has a mod to Parma controllers that allows Resistance adjustment.

For some reason, I can't post on the BB, even though I am registered.

Could you post this link as a suggestion for an alternative to the more expensive variable resistance controllers.

Thanks,


http://www.inlandempirehoraceway.itgo.com/custom.html
 
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