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Discussion Starter #1
Fisrt off I decided to go with new instead of vintage. I got a Carrera set.
Here is a few of my questions.
I have not used the set yet. Is there anything I should do to the cars before I use them?

What kind of items do I use to clean the track/cars? As far as the cars what kind of lube, if any, will I need down the road?

Can these factory cars be upgraded? Wheels,gears,etc.

Do clubs and open tracks allow these kind of box stock cars or would I be laughed at for walking in the door with one. I mean do alot of races offer a stock class?

I know once I get into it I will understand how it all works. I used to race R/C cars and when I started out I was green but before I knew it I had around 2 grand invested in upgrades and extras and so on. So I know that there will be more things I will need/want down the road. I just need alot of input.

Sorry for the long read. Thanks!!!!
 

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Beachbomb,

I'm sort of in the same boat as you, so to speak. I too stepped away from R/C and got into the 1/32 cars for racing because they are way less expensive and there is a race track less than 5 miles from my house.

As far as getting a kit track with kit cars, for starting, its totally fine and no, no one should laugh at you. I bought a Scaley track that had some Cadillac LeMans cars in them. While they are not the best cars in the world for LeMans these cars allowed me to have fun while I learn a little more about racing these cars as compared to the R/C cars.

So let me see if I can answer your questions. First, as far as doing something to the cars, that is total subjective to the individual. I had several guys give me several different answers. The biggest thing is that these are still electric motors and as you know from R/C, they need to be broken in a bit. What I have done to break them varies and I have seen no real difference. I did a water breakin where I pulled the motor out of the car and submerged it in a glass of what then hooked up the leads to a 9V battery and just let the motor run the battery down to nothing. I have also just ran the car around the track I have at home until it seemed that the brushes had set. And of course I have lifted the rear end of the car up on the track while letting the front in sit in the slot and just rubber banded the throttle on the controller and let the car sit and run until the motor sound changed. Several different things you can do, all subjective. Aside from that, there are some other things you could do, but that is more dependent upon the track you will be racing the cars at. For instance, my track does not allow magnets in the cars. That means you have to buy lead and start weighting and balancing the car so it does not slip and slide off the track. That is a whole other subject and usually take a bit longer to learn - if your track does not allow magnets you may have to check with the locals to see if they can help guide you. My track also allows us to true the tires on the cars. Believe it or not, there is a setup board you can buy for the car that will show you have out of round the tires are. The rears are what you focus on - you want those completely flat and making full contact with the track for the best possible grip. You also don't want any gaps in the flatness as those result in the tire rolling in a bumpy fashion - that will deslot your car when you are making bank turns. I take my front tires and grind or true them down so that they do not even touch the track or the setup board when I place the car and all of its racing weight on the track. Aside from that, there are some other tricks you can do like loosening up the screws on the body to allow the body to "float" a bit more - weight distribution thing that keeps the car in the slot. Ultimately, all the tweaks and things you can do to the car is to keep the car in the slot while you are racing.

Track clean don't use any sort of chemical or spray, etc. Just a clean dry towel to remove dust, dirt and debris is fine. For the cars, grab some electric motor cleaner (if you do not have any from when you ran R/C), some zero friction grease tha tis safe for plastic, and some bushing style oil. Motor cleaner is obviously for the motor and can be sprayed into any opening you have in the can. The white grease will be used, VERY sparingly on the crown and pinion gearing mesh. And the oil will be used on the bushings/bearings of the motor (either end of the can) and on where the axles make contact with the carriers/holders. I don't do this too often unless I have an accumulation of dirt and what not. As for the braids of the car, you need to make sure that they do not get unbraided as well as stay as close to the guide as possible - this is another thing that will deslot you if you let the braids rise up (it pushes the cars front end out of the slot and makes it a lot easier to deslot the car).

Yes, the cars can be upgraded and every manufacturer carries their own line of upgrade parts. Now, check with your local track, because, in the case of mine, they do not allow you to modify the car from stock. In fact, you must go back to the original or acceptable replacement tires if you need them. They will not allow a crown or pinion change or anything else to be modified. You can't remove any part or piece. So check with the track first.

As for the classes, it depends on each track. For us, we have what is called Challengers League, Champions League, Contenders League, Sprint League, and Drag League. If you are new, the most popular one to run is Challengers League B class. In this class you have 4 kinds of racing/cars we rotate through - F1, LeMans, NASCAR, and GT. So every Friday night we race a different class for 12 weeks. If you are in the top 10, you move up to the Challengers A class - call it intermediate racing. Same cars, same racing, just better racers. If you place within the top 10 there, then you can bump up to Champions League. Now there, you still have 4 kinds of racing/cars that you rotate through, but different cars - WRC, NASCAR scratch build, Open (whatever you want to build), GT scratch. Contenders League is for those who do not want to race without magnets and is run on a different night than Challengers and Contenders - they run Group C's and are about to race Minis - yes, mini cooper cars! LOL! Sprints are for sprinters, outlaws, and the like - womp-womps and Champ cars. And then Drag is for running drag bracket racing cars.

So unlike R/C where you had a Sportsman class, it kind of depends on what you have in that car set. And again, each track is different.

Well, hopefully I have helped you some, but again, it is gonna be dependent upon your track. So be sure to check with them and they will be able to lead and guide you better.

Good luck and have fun!!
PD2:thumbsup:
 

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Hi Beachbomb, congrats on your set, which one did you get? I can't make up my mind between Carrera and Scalextric. How did you make your decision?
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Set

Hi, First off thanks for the responses and for all the info. The set I got was the Carrera massive power set (I believe that is what it is called). It is the set that comes with the dark blue superbird and the red road runner. Most of the sets I looked at pretty much had the same track plan so I looked for a set that had cars that I like. I do have to say that I did buy a few Scalextric cars and they tend to run better then the Carrera cars. They stay on the track better and seem to be faster. Good luck....
 

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beachbomb said:
Hi, First off thanks for the responses and for all the info. The set I got was the Carrera massive power set (I believe that is what it is called). It is the set that comes with the dark blue superbird and the red road runner. Most of the sets I looked at pretty much had the same track plan so I looked for a set that had cars that I like. I do have to say that I did buy a few Scalextric cars and they tend to run better then the Carrera cars. They stay on the track better and seem to be faster. Good luck....
Most definitely! Carrera are nice, but they spend the majority of their time on the "art" factor and making sure the car looks sweet in the box. Once you pull it out, they are in serious need of help if you intend to race them. About the only class we race that Carrera is in is the American Iron class because they have a lot of classic muscle cars.

The Scalextrics were good, but theire biggest thing is the inconsistency in the motors. One motor can have some great punch, like my Dallara F1 car from Scaley. But the ones that came with my kit have totally lost their punch lately - of course, they are going to be coming up on a year old, but still.

The NINCO's seem to be screamin fast no matter which car you buy and the Slot.It's are scratch built quality with pro parts in an OEM release - definitely the best bang for the buck!

Enjoy!
PD2:thumbsup:
 

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You're on the right track! (Sorry!)

It sounds like you have an excellent start. The Carrera track is great and you can have fun racing the set cars.

Two things are missing from most slot car sets. Straight track and control. So go get some more straight track sections. The power and control is OK to start with but two Parma econo 25, 35 or 45 Ohm controllers are a great investment. A new power supply is well worth it but an adjustable voltage unit is over $100 which sounds like a lot until you check the price of some aftermarket parts.

I tell people to set-up an oval track first with at least six feet of straight, not nesseccarily for yourself but for friends and family to learn how to race.

There is no end to the improvements and modification you can make to your track and cars. I think it is much more economical to upgrade the power and control instead of everyone of your cars. I prefer to run my cars totally stock and this seems to provide fair racing, the cars don't have perfectly indentical performance but they are close enough that the driver makes the difference.

There can be a huge difference in the performance of the various cars made by the numerous producers. What we do is race all the same brand and type of car together - no mixing and matching of different brands and kinds of cars. I have found that the "slower" cars are more challenging to drive and race than the faster ones.

Check out www.HomeRacingWorld.com
for more info.

Let us know how it's going!
 
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