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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Spend some time perusing the car collection of Matt Garrett from Dallas TX. Many of you may have run across this gentleman's website before, or some of the photos from his collection while surfing, but for those who haven't, his website is below. If you have an ounce of motor oil in your blood, you won't be disappointed.

The most enjoyable thing about his site I think, aside from the cars themselves, is how evident his passion for cars is. It shows in his high resolution photography, and in the personal commentary included with each vehicle. He really wants to share the experience... The focus of Mr. Garrett's fleet is up my own alley in a big way, and I share many of his personal views about cars, old and new, so it's always a fun visit. It appears he sells or trades off certain vehicles, so it's worth checking back to see what's new from time to time. I'm sure you all will enjoy.
:thumbsup:


http://www.mcsmk8.com/cadillacs/mycads.htm

Typing GM-Classics.com in the browser takes you there also.

:wave:
 

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Cool link. His vision of the future of collector cars is interesting, though. While I tend to agree that '80s Mustangs, Vettes, and Camaro's/Firebirds will be in more demand 15 years from now and maybe Honda Civics will be in demand 30 years from now, I don't agree that they will bring the kind of money Hemi 'Cudas, 427 Vettes, etc. bring now. Why? People didn't collect muscle cars when new and a few years old. They were raced and wrecked and sold as scrap. Car collecting (buying new and putting in storage) didn't begin in large until the late '70s with the '78 Pace Car and Anniversary Vette and late '70s Firebirds and TAs. That's why they can be found with little-to-no miles on them today. It only increased in the '80s. So my opinion is that demand may be the same in the future, but supply will be much greater than it is for muscle cars and '50s vehicles, meaning lower values.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Car collecting (buying new and putting in storage) didn't begin in large until the late '70s with the '78 Pace Car and Anniversary Vette and late '70s Firebirds and TAs. That's why they can be found with little-to-no miles on them today. It only increased in the '80s.
Before the classics and muscle cars that we know today were "collectible", car collectors stashed what would be considered true classics even today. Vehicles of the 30's on back. So while storing for posterity would become much more common later on as the practice of collecting cars grew through the decades, it wouldn't have been completely unheard of back then. Some cars were preserved circumstantially, i.e. the proverbial barn find. While others more deliberately. Such is the case with this '71 Coupe Deville which is claimed as original as original can get - minus the wheels and tires. http://www.mcsmk8.com/71-CAD/71-CAD.html Stored underground in a temperature controlled garage for what was probably decades... Perhaps he was adjusting for inflation when predicting that Honda Civics would command Hemi 'Cuda money thirty years in the future. That's the only way that could make sense.

@ Walsing, I agree. There are quite a few Cadillacs in that collection I would love to call my own!
 

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About a third of his cars I would have no interest in.
Strange to me that someone with apparently such high monitary resources would collect in a way relatively 'hum-drum" cars like '90s Cads and 'Vettes.
Don't miss-understand, there's nothing really wrong with these, it's just that it would appear he could afford MUCH more interesting cars...but I guess he just buys what he likes!
That black over red '65 Riv is an interesting color combo!
Cool linc FF!
 

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I am in drooling like a baby in love with that black caddy convertible and would love to have it and the Riviera, the rest don't move me as much, I'm afraid. After watching a few generations go by I have come to the conclusion that the biggest determinant of what a person likes is based on what they knew during their most formative years. There are exceptions, of course - some cars are so classic they will always appeal - but otherwise people seem to see the beauty most in what they know and remember. jmho
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Let it be noted that many of this man's cars are 30+ years old in near factory new condition. Collecting time capsule cars are a niche in themselves. I also think an interest in real world production cars - as opposed to exotic or ultra high end is what fuels a collection of off the rack GM's. It's about the experience, substance and history of a model. And not so much about limited production or elite curb status. Some of his cars are indeed among the best ever built as common as they may seem. Kind of how a diecast collector may grow tired of Hemi muscle cars, Shelbys, and such, and yearn for a basic four-door with poverty caps, or a camper pickup truck to put on his shelf.

I've discovered that many of the cars I would like to own, can be found on the current market in nice shape for $20k or less, and they are very nice cars. They may not be "exotic", but they are the cars I would fill my own garage with, even given vast financial resources to fill it with anything out there. Sure, I might have the odd Lamborghini, a couple pre-VW Bentleys, and some other choice foreign gems. But the majority would be Detroit iron up to the early 70's - even though I was a teen in the 90's. They are honest and true, and regarding mass production, I see artistry in industry.
 

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Let it be noted that many of this man's cars are 30+ years old in near factory new condition. Collecting time capsule cars are a niche in themselves. I also think an interest in real world production cars - as opposed to exotic or ultra high end is what fuels a collection of off the rack GM's. It's about the experience, substance and history of a model. And not so much about limited production or elite curb status. Some of his cars are indeed among the best ever built as common as they may seem. Kind of how a diecast collector may grow tired of Hemi muscle cars, Shelbys, and such, and yearn for a basic four-door with poverty caps, or a camper pickup truck to put on his shelf.

I've discovered that many of the cars I would like to own, can be found on the current market in nice shape for $20k or less, and they are very nice cars. They may not be "exotic", but they are the cars I would fill my own garage with, even given vast financial resources to fill it with anything out there. Sure, I might have the odd Lamborghini, a couple pre-VW Bentleys, and some other choice foreign gems. But the majority would be Detroit iron up to the early 70's - even though I was a teen in the 90's. They are honest and true, and regarding mass production, I see artistry in industry.
Hear! Hear! Not into the exotics at all but boy is there a bunch of old Detroit Iron I would love to put in my garage. Pretty much sums up my diecast collection/interest as well.
 

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An interesting collection, takes it to a whole other level. Not my thing either but I understand his point about collecting "mint" cars.
 

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very strange mix of cars but I could see most being collectible ,and that mercedes is awesome.It`s nice to see someone collecting and not loaded with camaros and stangs.
 
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