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What are your guy's opinions on the future value of hot wheels, mainly recolours, treasure hunts, and supers. Will the newer hot wheels hold the value of the older redlines and classics? I honestly don't think so.

The reason I ask this is because I've been having the thought of opening up everything(except my treasure hunts and supers), and displaying them in a nicely built custom case to appreciate daily.

I've been collecting since I was about 6 years old, being 19 now I appreciate the looks of my older cars(and newer ones). Right now my collection is in about seven tubs stacked in the attic. It sucks not being able to see my collecting over the years. I did hang each hot wheel on my wall(covered two walls in my room), but took them down because it was a pain. You bump the wall and it would damage the cards. Not to mention the thumb tacks I had to use to hang the short-card variations(which probably ruined their "value").

To you collectors out there, how do you display your collection? Do you even display? What's your opinion on the future of hot wheels in terms of value?

Thanks guys and gals :)

-Dylan
 

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Ok, here goes a rant.

There are far too many cars made now days. Unlike in the early days, even up to the early 90s, there weren't that many collectors out there. Since about 1997 and up, collecting has been on a upward trend. There are far too many examples out there of mint examples on cards. The newer treasure hunts are nothing but another mainline series. The hype is collector-created. They never will release numbers on how many are exactly made, but there are plenty out there. The green stripe is over hyped. That's why when people see 3 of them hanging, they take all of them.

Money plays part of this too. The newest $uper hunt can be sold on eBay for a hefty premium.

Let me ask you this? Why was it that the majority of people couldn't go to the store and find an Ecto-1? It's not the fact that they are rare - there were plenty made. It was a hoarded casting. People couldn't just buy one. They had to but 5, 10, 40, etc. What did they do with them? They stuck them in a box or sold them on the secondary market.

This kind of stuff really sucked the fun out of the hobby. I refuse to pay secondary market prices so there are a lot of cars that I'd like but I force myself to go without.

As for displaying, anything that gets to my house gets opened. I've got some display cases mounted on my wall for my redlines and blackwalls. Everything is photographed and for now goes in a container until I can acquire more display cabinets. They are easily accessible so when it's time to race with my kids I can easily pick out the ones that will be running in the race.

I believe the most important thing to remember is that these dear little cars are just toys. I don't believe that even with a mass quantity you will see any type of monetary return on your 'investment'. If people are really looking for ways to invest, check out the stock market, buy gold, rental properties, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Ok, here goes a rant.

There are far too many cars made now days. Unlike in the early days, even up to the early 90s, there weren't that many collectors out there. Since about 1997 and up, collecting has been on a upward trend. There are far too many examples out there of mint examples on cards. The newer treasure hunts are nothing but another mainline series. The hype is collector-created. They never will release numbers on how many are exactly made, but there are plenty out there. The green stripe is over hyped. That's why when people see 3 of them hanging, they take all of them.

Money plays part of this too. The newest hunt can be sold on eBay for a hefty premium.

Let me ask you this? Why was it that the majority of people couldn't go to the store and find an Ecto-1? It's not the fact that they are rare - there were plenty made. It was a hoarded casting. People couldn't just buy one. They had to but 5, 10, 40, etc. What did they do with them? They stuck them in a box or sold them on the secondary market.

This kind of stuff really sucked the fun out of the hobby. I refuse to pay secondary market prices so there are a lot of cars that I'd like but I force myself to go without.

As for displaying, anything that gets to my house gets opened. I've got some display cases mounted on my wall for my redlines and blackwalls. Everything is photographed and for now goes in a container until I can acquire more display cabinets. They are easily accessible so when it's time to race with my kids I can easily pick out the ones that will be running in the race.

I believe the most important thing to remember is that these dear little cars are just toys. I don't believe that even with a mass quantity you will see any type of monetary return on your 'investment'. If people are really looking for ways to invest, check out the stock market, buy gold, rental properties, etc.
I agree 100% on what you said about people taking every treasure hunt they see, or every 'rare' mainline car. That doesn't leave fun for other collectors. The only way you can grab treasure hunt is if you are the first person there when they re-stock. I've left plenty of treasure hunts; reasons being I don't like the look of the car, or I already have one at home. I want to keep that feeling alive that I had when I was a kid hunting with my dad. When I saw that green strip on the front of the card(or on the side later on), it gave me such a good feeling inside. I wish more collectors did the same.

Supers are a little different in that they do hold some value to collectors. I've been trying to find the 599xx super but no luck so far. I REFUSE to pay 30 dollars on ebay, that's just crazy. Then what's the point of hunting if you can just buy what you want for a hefty amount.
 

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I agree about the $upers. I myself want the 599XX but like you, I refuse to pay CRAZY $$$ for it. If I find one, good. If I don't, oh well.
 

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Let me ask you this? Why was it that the majority of people couldn't go to the store and find an Ecto-1? It's not the fact that they are rare - there were plenty made. It was a hoarded casting. People couldn't just buy one. They had to but 5, 10, 40, etc. What did they do with them? They stuck them in a box or sold them on the secondary market.
I'm wondering what people are going to do with those hoards down the road. Dump them on eBay or at a toy show for 3/$1.00? Return the whole tub of them to their neighborhood Walmart? Probably never going to be any real value higher than whatever they could've gotten right when they came out.
 

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I understand hoarding some castings to a point. I know quite a few guys that buy 20 of a certain casting. They build customs with them. Other than that, I don't understand why you'd need more than one or two of something (one to open, one to keep in the blister). If I have more than one of a certain casting in my house it's due to the fact that both of my kids liked it as well as my wife - we all collect.
 

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i'm counting on retiring in the lap of luxury when i sell my entire diecast collection to some rich little east asian kid in 20 years time. ;):p:drunk::freak:


seriously, they are just little toy cars that cost about 25 cents to make. and they are absolutely no fun to play with still inside the package.
 

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They are only as "valuable" as one makes them out to be. For instance, I would NEVER drop money on a pair of Air Jordans. I'm sure they are nice, but a huge waste of money if you aren't going to wear them. They make a $30 TH seem cheap in comparison.

My collection is mostly common mainlines with some Garage, Boulevard, Classics, regular TH, Ultra Hots, Hot Ones and other adult versions of regular cars. Once I get my new wall displays mounted, all of my cars will be opened for display. Like you have now, mine are sitting in a tub.
 

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Rip..........tear...........destroy them packages!! Enjoy your toys for what they are..........TOYS! :thumbsup: :tongue: :wave:

With that being said. I, for the most part, open my diecast. Do not open a few for various reasons, the top two being I like the card art. The new Nostalgia Saturday Evening Post series is a good example. I bought this series to keep carded 'cause the cards look just as good as the cars. At least to me. The second reason does have to do with value though, most not all of my higher value cars I keep carded. I do this in the event I need $$ for something like unexpected car repairs. In this case I'm not looking to make a profit just re coupe some cash if things get to tight.
 

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open everything ou have room to dispaly.if you think you are gonna get rich on waiting for the value to go up than you are wasting your time .
 

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Welcome to the Board Dylan :wave:

I'll make this sweet n simple .....

Open everything up that is from 1990 to date as what you see today is MASS Produced.... Nothing is Limited or RARE from Mattel

I like to pick up the 1980 HW still blistered and keep them original but if the HW is 1990 to date - I open them
 

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I agree with tszuta, though I wouldn't call it a rant. Just plain simple Truth. If you Buy what you Like and Like what you Buy, that's collecting. Getting $$$$ for your collection should be secondary. I know plenty of Baseball card collectors from the 90's that bought stuff thinking they would put their kid through College or Retire and sell it all. Some of them are now doing the same think with T-hunts. They just never learn. They have a basement full of whatever the hot collectable was through the years that ain't worth crap now. Me....... well, I got a collection of what I have purchased over the years going back to the early 70's................. and I'm Happy with that.
 

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My question would be what do you consider a casting holding its worth.
The pink Bedlam from 2004 is considered valuable, well over $300. Another is the blue Dodge Charger with flames from '04.
Then there are some that are tough to get that do not command a high dollar value like the smooth grill Ratbomb from 2008.
I collect because I like the castings, not to get rich. If I have a car that is worth some money great, if it is only worth a buck so be it.
As for displaying, I found palstic strips with slot in the middle that makes a channel for the card to slide into. They are 8 feet long at Lowe's for about $2.50. I've got a wall that is 45 feet wide and is 8 feet high and I've got many of my cars displayed that way.
 

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Just remember, for there to be a "worth" on that rare/HTF/valuable car, somebody has to actually want it for that price. Same scenario as all those "antiques roadshow" type shows where they say people's stuff is worth $25,000 but let's see them actually get that for it.
 

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I'm not buying any of the cars the scalpers go find and then sell for prices that are not worth what the car is worth. It's a hobby, they need to stop turning it into a business...
 

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Vintage is a rewarding and profitable side of our hobby. :) Redlines and other vintage pieces look great, have great appeal to collect, and hold their value if you need to sell them. Don't get me wrong, I love and buy currently produced models. But I think vintage is an awesome part of diecast collecting.
 

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Well 90% of my collection consists mainly pre-80's diecast. All mint Redlines, Sizzlers, Matchbox, Blackwalls and so on. Trust me, There's a lot less "Drama" going on in my world... :)
 
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