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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone have any good suggestions on ways of handling those tiny etched metal pieces in several kits out these days? I can deal with some of them with my fingers, or tweezers, but some are so small, that I end up supergluing them to my fingers, or tweezers, instead of gluing to where I want it on the . I'm working on a 1/48 fw-189a right now, and parts, such as the cross hairs that are suppose to mount on the resin gun barrels, are just too small for me to handle. Any suggestions, or is it that I'm just getting to old, and fat fingered? Thanks. :confused:
 

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Patience, a good pair of tweezers and great glue control. It takes a lot of patience and trial and error to get used to handling these. A great pair of tweezers helps too. But most important is being able to control the glue. Sometimes you have a puddle of glue sitting on a piece of tape and you can dip the part, other times you have to use a drop from an applicator, just becareful and practice....
 

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I've never done this myself, but some folks use white glue (US Elmers, UK/OZ Aquadhere) for taking down, it dries clear, then use CA/superglue. It might be good for really trciky parts. I dunno
 

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Oxidation Genius
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Hey, I was gluing some of those to my fingers just last night! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks, guys. I was afraid of the persaverance part, but kind of relieved that it just takes practice. I'll have to find a more precession pair of tweezers. It's also good to know that I'm not the only one gluing the dang things to my fingers. :lol:

[Sometimes you have a puddle of glue sitting on a piece of tape and you can dip the part]

I've never tried putting the glue on tape, and dipping. Thanks for the tip, RossJr.
 

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Use a pin, with the end cut off and jabbed into the eraser of an old pencil. use THAT to dab the glue from a small puddle and onto your part, or where you want to attach that part.
 

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Y3a said:
Use a pin, with the end cut off and jabbed into the eraser of an old pencil. use THAT to dab the glue from a small puddle and onto your part, or where you want to attach that part.
Or just a sharp-ended round toothpick. I keep a box of them handy at the workbench.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
John P said:
Or just a sharp-ended round toothpick. I keep a box of them handy at the workbench.
I've used a pin, and a toothpick before, but never tried with an eraser on the end. I'll give it a shot. Thanks.
 

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Oxidation Genius
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I think the eraser is just to use as a grip.
 

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I've been told by experienced photo-etch assemblers that you should take a sewing needle, cut about half of the eye of the needle off, leaving a tiny Y shape. Then you can dip the y into the glue, and it will hold a small amount of superglue between the little Y shape. I've seen the techique demostrated before, and it looks like it works well.

Also, invest in a good set of tweezers, maybe 2-3 different sizes/lengths/styles, this will ensure you always have the right tool for each tiny piece of metal you come across.

Josh
 

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compucrap said:
I've been told by experienced photo-etch assemblers that you should take a sewing needle, cut about half of the eye of the needle off, leaving a tiny Y shape. Then you can dip the y into the glue, and it will hold a small amount of superglue between the little Y shape. I've seen the techique demostrated before, and it looks like it works well.
Yep, this is the way to go. I used this method quite extensively and it works like a charm.

I would also suggest a magnifying loupe or at the very least a pair of those magnifying reading glasses you can get at Big Lots, drug store check-out lines, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
"I've been told by experienced photo-etch assemblers that you should take a sewing needle, cut about half of the eye of the needle off, leaving a tiny Y shape. Then you can dip the y into the glue, and it will hold a small amount of superglue between the little Y shape. I've seen the techique demostrated before, and it looks like it works well."

This I am definately going to try. I had thought about using a magnifying glass, but I like the Jeweler's Loop idea better. Thanks for the great tips.
 
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