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Discussion Starter #1
I recently made my own paint booth from parts available at Menards. I'm certain the same parts would be available from just about any home-improvement store like Lowes or Home Depot for example.

I took a large plastic tub (sans lid), a bathroom vent fan, filters from Amazon for a commercially available paint booth, some flexible vent ducting, and a little Flex Tape and Flex Seal and combined them to make the booth itself. I chose a translucent tub to allow light to enter and light what I'm painting. I cut a hole just a little smaller than the opening on the vent fan on the botton of the tub and using Flex Seal, mounted the fan to the hole. Now this will not hold the fan on the tub itself, so I used the Flex Tape to hold the fan to the tub. I also bought a line cord with plug attached, a wall switch, and a mounting box for the switch. I used this to wire up the vent fan to the switch so that I could plug it into a wall socket and turn the fan off and on using the switch. I attached the ducting to the output of the vent fan and the booth was ready.

With that completed, I purchased parts to make a tall shelf unit. I bought four 7-foot tall posts, and three 48-inch wire shelves (all black, but you may want a different color) and assembled them to be able to hold the booth itself at my standing height. This was most comfortable for me, but you build yours to suit yourself. Some folks would rather have the booth lower, and some prefer to sit while painting.

I also purchased and attached wheels to the four posts so that I can move the paint booth around as needed. To use the booth, I roll it over to a window (I'm in the basement...) I open a window and place the end of the ducting in the the open window. My basement windows open in, so I close the window a little to hold the duct and keep it from falling out. I place the filter I purchased from Amazon over the opening in the bottom of the tub (mine stays put without help.), plug the fan into a wall socket and I'm ready to paint.

Anyone else built their own paintbooth? Inquiring minds want to know!

Larry
 

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I like his solution, but should he be concerned about possibly explosive fumes from enamel and similar paints if not using a brushless fan?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
NTRPRZ, that is a valid (and astute!) observation! I've had no problems so far, and I'm careful while spraying, but with a common bathroom vent fan, there is the possibility of a spark igniting the paint vapors. If anyone has a suggestion for a subsitute fan, I'm all eyes. (Since I'll be reading your suggestions, I can't very well be all ears, no can I?) ;-)

Larry
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Do they make bathroom vent fans with brushless motors? If so I'm sure they cost a LOT more than the one I bought at Menards!
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Larry
 

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I bought a motor especially built for this at Wonderfest three years ago. It ran me $150, but I thought it would be worth it. I still haven't finished building the rest of the spray booth, though. Now that I'm retired, I'll get it done.
 

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I would be more concerned on putting the end of the flexible tubing in the window. Paint fumes are inherently heavier than air and are probably just falling back into the room from the open window.
 

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I'm pretty sure that the bathroom fans currently available won't cause the paint fumes in the paints you're using to ignite.

(I had this debate with several modelers years ago, when I originally built my first spray booth). With, the fan unit was exposed - no cover was used, in order to help with the airflow - and I never had any issues with any sort of explosions occurring.

I even went so far as to spray the paints directly into the fan mechanism, with no explosion. (What can I say? I live life on the wild side).

I think I remember having a conversation with an associate at an electrical store at the time, asking him about this. He said that they aren't designed to spark.

(Naturally) if you have doubts, check with an electrical expert on this. (I just wanted to put this out, in order to prevent this from dissuading someone from building their own spray booth).

Keep the glue and paint flowing, take care and stay blessed!

- Tony

"No Try! Do or Do Not! There is no try." - Yoda

Science Fiction & Fantasy Model Madness Realm
(The Sci-Fi and Fantasy Model Madness Realm)
 

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I concur, there is little chance of enough explosive gas building in a quantity that would cause an ignition.
 

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If you are worried about explosion, just get a bilge fan (they remove gas vapors). I've been using one for about 15 yrs now. I mostly spray lacquers and enamels thinned with lacquer thinner haven't blown up yet. They are not very expensive. The one i bought was designed for 4 inch hose, pretty simple to install inline and powered with a wall jack. I don't think you could build up enough fumes with an airbrush but why chance it, plus the wife doesn't smell it probably worse than an explosion if she did.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I think I do get some blow-back of fumes coming from the window. Especially if the wind is blowing into the window. I would be better off to have something that would block the window to prevent fumes coming from the vent hose from coming back into the window. My basement windows, however, open in so I'm not sure how I would accomplish that.

Larry
 

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Like others, I dont think there are enough fumes to cause an explosion. Especially if you run the booth like a bilge fan and run it prior to painting and then after you finish painting. If you are getting blow back use a longer tube or hang more of it outside the window (or away (down wind) from the window.)
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thanks for your suggestions!! I was using the booth yesterday (Sunday) and gave some thought to what everyone has been saying. I do leave the fan running for several minutes after I finish painting to suck out the fumes coming from the painted model still in the booth. I had no problems with blow-back, but I can't extend the vent outside of the window becasue of it's screen. What would you think if I added an in-line fan to the vent tubing to help the vent fan move the fumes out of the booth and the surrounding area? I'll have to add solid tubing from the vent fan to the in-line fan, but that won't cost much and the power to run the in-line fan can be taken from the power strip the vent fan and lights are currently plugged into.

Larry
 

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Larry,

I think that's a great idea!

I actually did that when designing and building a "spray box". My box was just a plastic container with filter pads added inside and holes drilled in the side. It attaches to a spray booth, and was made to allow spray painting and airbrushing to be done inside, (removing the need to vent outside).

The original fan I attached to my portable spray booth was a less powerful one obtained from an old tower computer.
I wanted to help the air-flow into the box and decided to add a second fan at the top on its hole, in order to help "pull" the paint fumes down into the spray box:

Good luck.

- Tony
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I checked the prices of the vent fans I spoke of earlier and OMG! The good ones are rather pricey! For now, I'll stick to what I have, unless I can come across another bathrom vent fan that moves more air than the one I have now at a reasonalble price. To spend a bunch on this booth shows I should have just bought the professional one in the first place.

Larry
 
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