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Discussion Starter #1
Can someone explain to me how to get the best photos? Mine seem to have glare on them or don't show a crips pic. I have a great sony camera and it does awesome for me outside of the house. But in the house I can't seem to get a good shot.

Can anyone advise me?? I went to the bookstore, but they really didn't have anything there.
 

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I 've done a lot of trial and error with pix over the last 6 or 7 years or so... not that I am any kind of self-proclaimed expert and without knowing what kind of camera you have or what your shooting- under what conditions... it all depends.

but, you might want to try experimenting with a few things that I figured out over the years; the hard way:

Lighting- it's best to have good lighting and not rely so much on the camera flash to get your shots, plus playing with the lighting allows you to eliminate shadows, overexposure, etc. In many of my shots... i don't even use the camera flash at all and rely on the lighting.

exposure compensation- most digital cams have this feature. fiddling with it eliminates that "white wash" look on your pix. most cameras also have flash intensity settings too.

focus- I usually use Aperture priority- it gives you the clearest pic with the sharpest focus of the entire pic.

white balance- you have tinker with this also to get good diecast shots indoors as well.

most of all, you've got to practice and for lack of a more technical term- fiddle with the camera -until you figure it out. When you first start out- take a bunch of shots- I like to reveiw each and every shot as I go along... and figure out what works and delete the rest. I know it sounds stupid, but it can't hurt to read the manual either.

hope this helps
 

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Don't think it was mentioned above, but he just said he has a Sony camera..

it may be just a point and shoot, and maybe all Sony's have it..

But make sure yer camera has a 'macro' function for shooting close ups of diecast (for layman, the little 'flower' symbol)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the input. I have a Sony DSC-H7 cybershot.

I think it may be a lighting issue, not to mention the reflection on the clamshell. Where is the best place to set the car in relation to a light?

Believe me, I have take over 4000 photos just of my collection with camera, not to mention photos of special events, car shows, family and so on.

It just seems I can't get it right on the diecast in the clamshell.
 

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One thing that was mentioned was using the Macro feature on your camera. It's the flower setting if your camera has it. Also when taking pics of carded cars you should have the car at an angle or the camera at an angle. This will give the light from the flash a different way of dispersing itself and not cause glare.

I just got a new camera myself. Nikon S570 12 MP. Great camera, but still working on setting it to get the right shots.
 

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I have a Sony DSC-P32 Cyber Shot and it takes great pics... I really believe the lighting has alot to do with the shots... I've had some crappy lightning and the shots turn out the same way... My camera sits on a tri-pod so there is no movement at all... I think the Sonys are good enough cameras, just play around until it starts working for ya... I used to get some really good shots of my stuff with a regular old Kodak instamatic with 35mm film... Long before this digital stuff was even thought of...

Try a hand held flourscent light, so ya can move it aroubd to different spots and different angles to prevent any reflections...
I've never messed with any of the settings on my camera... Good luck !!!
 

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I have found for glare issues , is to turn off the flash . Room lighting usually causes the reflection too , you gotta prop the item at an angle to eliminate it . You should be able to see the glare reflection when looking through the camera before taking the picture & move around to where its not there .. ..
 

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of course, by kind of camera- I meant an entry level digital, DLSR, point and shoot, etc., because different types of cameras have different features and settings. :tongue:

i'm probably the last person in the world to give any advice about taking pix of packages... but I definitely would agree with SF and others that the camera is NOT important; but how you USE it. The lighting, the composition of the shot, and the settings definitely are all important.
 

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What you're seeing is the "sunburst effect" off the clear clam shell. The problem comes up because of the way the TTL flash metering works on automatic flash cameras.

Two ways to beat the problem.

First is to shut off the camera's onboard flash and use a couple daylight balanced "fill" lights. The way to do this is to go to your local home center and pick up a couple of the clamp-on aluminum dish type work lights.

Then go to the light bulb section and look for "Daylight Balanced" bulbs. Reveal is one of the brand names. Pick up a couple of these in 100 watt size.

Set your subject on a table with a light gray or light blue background. Easiest way for this is to pick up a piece of poster board in light gray or light blue. Automatic cameras are set for 14% gray so the internal meter the light accordingly. Avoid pure white backgrounds as these can really trick the exposure meters.

Place the clamp-on lights above or to the side to obliquely light the subject.

Shoot your pictures.

The other way is to shoot outdoors with the sun behind you. but not directly overhead. This method works great in the summer or daytime kinda sucks in the rain or at night.

The first method is very similar to the method used by catalog photographers. Of course, they use fancy studio lights but the clamp-ons are fine for our purposes.
 

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I have 2 cameras. My old Minolta E223 that does great macro shots and my Canon A550 for everything else. The Canon is the best point and shoot camera for the money in my opinion, but not as good as the old Minolta for macro shots. I also use a light box to diffuse the light and a white paper background. I never use a flash



Here's a picture taken with the Canon


Here's one with the Minolta


Gerry :)
 

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Thanks for the great info. Do you use the MACRO setting with your canon? [looking for a new general-use camera].
 
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