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Discussion Starter #1
I read this an another BB years ago...if you have a windshield too damaged to repair, you can make a replacement by giving it a thin coat of vaseline and building up layers of clear nail varnish. When you get the right thickness, pry the replacement from the original. Obviously, make sure the original is sanded smooth and the surface is clean first.

Anyone try this?
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Hah! I lahff aht you gerlie men!

So, all you manly men are so scared for your carefully cultured machismo that you can't be seen buying nail varnish?? Well, me too. So just borrow some from a female relative or wife or girlfriend. Finally, a use for sisters.

I asked 'cuz I'm trying it out now not on winshields but on a putty mold for a splash piece for the Captain America kit. Was hoping someone would tell me how much vaseline is needed to keep the varnish piece from sticking to the original when it comes time to peel it.

It's taking forever, that stuff dries thin! it also has picked up a few specks, now imbedded. Maybe it'll look okay, it's for a mud puddle after all. I'll try the trick on a windshield soon. So far, so good. It's finally starting to build up, is crystal clear, seems nice and hard. Very glossy! Perfect for creating water splashes, if this works out. Should have bought some latex mold, though, to peel away from it. I've read there are different kinds, and a specific one should be used for casting parts. Any info in that? Like, a specific brand and whether it's at craft stores or only hobby shops?
 

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I remember reading that tip in the diorama sheets that came with Monogram armor kits back in the 70's. Never needed to try it so can't comment on the amount of Vaseline needed. Glad it seems to be working for you Jeff, don't forget to let us see the end results, please.
 

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Will do! No replies so I figured either you guys had either never tried it or never heard of it. I've got a few old car kits that need new windshields, had to try it sometime. Keeping dust and fuzzies out the varnish as it dries that's the hard part.
 

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I ran across the same tip in "How to Go Plastic Modeling" by Chris Ellis, a book that first came out in the late 1960's- he said just use butter for the barrier coat(!). I don't think you need a lot, just a relatively impermeable layer. I'm planning to try this on a 1/116 bomber windscreen in the indefinite future once I finish up a couple of old radio projects. If you're having trouble with dust and bubbles, mybe using multiple (read 30 to 60) light coats of aerosol lacquer could work. At least it would dry faster. A vacuform or thermoform would probably give you a better, more transparent windshield, but the nail polish trick is about as low tech as possible. And if it's ugly, just tint it!
Andrew
 
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