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Discussion Starter #1
I took apart the VW last night, which was relatively easy since these 1/24 Jadas seem to be mostly screwed into place. The toughest thing was scraping away some glue to get the bumpers, roof rack, and other chrome off. The only thing riveted were the front and back windshields. The front one had a square opening almost as wide as the rivets and with a little prying, came right out. The rear windows and were both glued and riveted, and they felt like they were just too fragile to mess with. Since no paint is going back there, I figured I could mask them off well enough.

Now, since this is going to be a BWF, and the car is already black, with the paint adhere to the finish of the car okay, or do I have to sand and prime first? This is going to be part airbrush and part freehand for what I have in mind. And if I do have to sand, there's no way to sand all the areas of where the flame trails extend along the body. Just too small and squiggly. Any final thoughts or tips before paint is applied?

Also, the interior of that car is pretty much a flat black, which I intent to customize as well. Any 1/1 Beetle owners that would car to email me some pics of the dash, engine and trunk space would be greatly appeciated. Thanks :)
 

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Sanding and priming is not needed. You can wipe it down with thinner or a paint reducer. Then take some OO gauge steel wool and wipe the car with that. Wipe gently! do not use excessive pressure, the paint from most diecast Mfgr's is almost always only about a mil or two thick.

Just before you paint wipe the car with a tach cloth. And tach in between coats, make sure the coat you just put on is flashed off properly before you try to tach and apply another coat.

Hope this helps, good luck
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Thanks viperdave. The tach cloth is a good idea to make sure there is no unwanted dust on the car. I was talking with a couple of guys today that did auto painting and detailing in an attempt to flesh out my research properly before beginning. What they said might be helpful to other who do customs, or it might be just repeating what a lot of you already know, but I'll post what they told me in the cause of furthering interest and to check the facts against the opinions of the experts.

I was told to lightly sand the overall existing paint using a 1500 to 2000 grain sandpaper. Gently enough to just to take the shine off the paint and create a surface with some tooth for the new paint to adhere better and bond with. After masking, airbrush the flames on in thin even coats, letting each coat dry for at least an hour before applying the next. Afterwards apply a quick mist of clear coat, allowing this to dry for a couple of minutes, then testing it on the edge of the masking tape with the tip of my finger. If the clear coat hairs when I pull my finger away, it's okay to apply a more even coat. Allow the clear coat to dry thoroughly for a couple of days, then buff the car with a high gloss polish for best results. The one guy said I could buy an expensive little buffer, but the other guy said a soft terry-cloth towel or an old cotton t-shirt often brings about the best shine, although it might take a little longer.

Also, a paint tip I picked up is that there isn't much difference between enamel and acrylic in the finished product, but the acrylic has a little more bleed time, so it won't clump as often, and in most cases, will both look and go on more smoothly. And using 1/1 auto products whenever possible will bring about the best results.

Hope that sharing my experience is helpful to someone.
 

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Great details drag. But as far as polishing goes........ I only use microfiber cloths on the paint, its by far the best to use as it leaves zero residue behind as opposed to a t shirt or terrycloth.
 
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