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Discussion Starter #1
I've always been curious as to how greater traction and banking play into how and what you set your corner weights at.

ie: a Sticky High Bite Flat Carpet Track vs a Low/Medium Bite Flat Asphalt parking lot type of track vs a Low Bite Concrete High Banked Concrete capped tire Track.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
No input?

I guess I'm looking for ideas on different weight positions for the different types of tracks.

What would be the optimum corner weight to start with on lower bite tracks vs higher bite tracks, and what do you do different on banked vs flat?

Someone has to have input or ideas to steer me the right way.
 

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A well balanced car setup will make use of it's traction as efficiently as possible. So generally with flat tracks, weight percentages don't change as much as you'd think when it comes to low bite verses high bite. Chassis geometry, body, and tire preferences will change the cross weight percentages from racer to racer, but generally speaking, I think it's safe to say that most people run the LF and LR weights very close to each other, usually within 1 oz.

The thing that would change more would be left weight percentage on a banked track. The more banking you have, the less left weight percentage you want. An extreme example would be a track that had so much banking, that it's actually possible to go around without any steering at all. In this case, you'd want the left weight percentage to be 50/50. A road course car would perform just as good on that track. High banking is the great chassis equalizer. Just about any chassis will do (as long as you aren't bottoming out). In this extreme example, the person with the best power combo would win. Flat tracks on the other extreme, would reward good oval chassis's and setup.

My advice, arrive to the track with the next faster motor installed. (Example: if you race 17.5, arrive with a 13.5 in). This will exaggerate the handling issues and lets you "see" the problems easier. Get the car to be able to handle that motor during practice. Then put the slower race motor in, and it'll be a piece of cake to drive come race time. If you can't get it to handle the faster motor, consider practicing the entire night. Sacrifice a night of racing, in order to get a lot of practice in to fix the problems. Just go out for 30 seconds to 1 minute. Bring it in, repeak, make make setup changes and repeat. You'll get a lot more done that way. The following week, you'll be smiling that you did.
 
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