Hobbyist Forums banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am planning on entering my first contest pretty soon. I have a question concerning one of the models I'm entering. I did a build of the Moebius Invisible man and am pretty happy with the results. However, I did not finish the back of the bookcase. At the time, I didn't think it was very important, but now I am wondering how it will effect me in the contest. Any advice on this and on contests in general would be greatly appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
861 Posts
I will only speak for myself. I would at least paint the back black or include a backdrop so it can't be seen. At some contests the judges get out their magnifying glasses. If it's down to yours and another then anything can sway the vote. Don't give them an inch. Since you came up with the question, THAT should give you the answer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
379 Posts
My 3 Stooges diorama had the background painted black, (it was wood). I later learned it was dropped from consideration as the judges thought I should have done more considering the rest of the diorama. Since then if take more care on the "unseen" side as well.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,010 Posts
mel,

I have judged many IPMS model contests and I wouldn't think of looking at the back of a model like the Invisible Man unless it was in competition with another I.M. or something similar.

Let's say the judging came down to your model and someone else's for First and Second Place, and the workmanship - no gaps or glue blobs apparent, seams filled where appropriate, paint applied smoothly with no brush marks or drips, etc. - were of the same quality (top-notch, I have no doubt ;)). Only then might the judges look at the back of your models to see whether either modeler had gone the extra mile to finish off the back of the wall.

For myself I prefer the 360 degree approach, making all of my models finshed on every side. That mainly comes from my dislike of having a raw, empty area on a model - the rest of which I've worked hard at to give as realistic an apperance as I can. The IPMS Competition Handbook has more information on what Judges look for and, therefore, what the competitve modeler needs to considerif he wants to enter his model in contests.

I enjoy model contests immensely. Not only for the competition, but the chance to see others' work in person and discuss our hobby with people whose eyes don't glaze over ten seconds into the conversation. And the Vendors Room usually have the best prices on kits new and old. Have a great time and let us know how you do!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,088 Posts
I finished the back of the book case on the IM because it looked like the back of a book case. My IM won a 3rd place at Wonderfest 3 years ago as well. For me it all depends on the model. This year I entered the Moebius Dracula and other than putting a large sheet of styrene behind the wall and sculpting stone work and a backside to the door back there I don't believe there is anything reasonable you can do. So for it I just sprayed the back of the wall with primer and stopped there. It won a merit at the Fest this year. For my Aurora Frankenstein I did glue a sheet of fitted styrene to the back of the gravestone as it was simple and fitting for this kit since the grave base wraps around the entire model. It also won a merit so they must have liked that and it might have made the difference in getting the merit. I also entered my Moebius Mummy and I painted it 360 degrees around as it builds up that way. I thought I did an excellent job on it and the back looked as good as the front but it won nothing which was a let down. This same model at the April IPMS local contest got 2nd overall while Dracula and Frankenstein got nothing. Go figure! I have found judging to be all over the park between contests but do consider Wonderfest judging as the best judging by far for our modeling subjects even though I get surprised by it as well.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,010 Posts
...I have found judging to be all over the park between contests but do consider Wonderfest judging as the best judging by far for our modeling subjects even though I get surprised by it as well.
I've run into similar situations, Bob. I can't say that WonderFest judging is so very much better, just different from IPMS. Here's what I've observed:

  • Most, but not all, IPMS contests follow the 1st, 2nd, 3rd Place system, which places the entries in direct competition with one another. WonderFest and some IPMS clubs use the Open system, in which each model is judged on its own merits and can win a Gold, Silver, or Bronze award, based on the level of competence the judges think the modeler has achieved with his model.
  • I've read a lot of complaints that IPMS Figures judges are usually not figure builders. That's rarely the case; I'm a figure builder, and Figures is what I usually judge. If my team gets to a category in which I'm entered, I step back and plug in another judge, confident that the other two members of the team will be competent figure model judges. Same goes for Sci-Fi, BTW.
  • At WonderFest, much emphasis is placed on a model's "Wow factor". I kind of get what that's supposed to mean, though clearly it will vary from one subject to the next. IPMS judges simply look to see that the basics of construction and finishing have been accomplished competently. If no manufacturing or assembly flaws are apparent, the appropriate seams are filled, and the paint has been applied without brush marks, drips, etc., a person's model should do well. Yes, aftermarket goodies can help, but only if the additions meet the criteria I've mentioned.
  • I'm sorry to have to admit that I've run into nepotism at a couple of IPMS shows. While I've raised an eyebrow more than once at some of the WonderFest judging, I'm not familiar enough with the judges to make a similar claim. Pretty much with any contest, "ya pays yer money an' ya takes yer chances."
Anyone who wants to enter their work in model competitions has to have a thick skin. Your work is going to be judged by others, regardless of which system is used. Judging is a subjective process so, unless you're positive of some skullduggery, you have to trust in the honesty and competence of the judges. Personally, I've found that competition has helped me become a better modeler but I'm aware that it's not for everyone.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,749 Posts
I also entered my Moebius Mummy and I painted it 360 degrees around as it builds up that way. I thought I did an excellent job on it and the back looked as good as the front but it won nothing which was a let down. This same model at the April IPMS local contest got 2nd overall while Dracula and Frankenstein got nothing. Go figure! I have found judging to be all over the park between contests but do consider Wonderfest judging as the best judging by far for our modeling subjects even though I get surprised by it as well.
Bob, it is so funny that you and I are so similar. Sandy even said that. It is so funny - both your Moebius Mummy and mine was back to back. Both back of the wall was done. And I thought both were OUTSTANDING. Both entered IPMS in our area's and both won 2nd place. And yet both got nothing at Wonderfest. So my answer is it depends on the Judges, do the back if you can cause they DO look at the whole thing. Just my thoughts.

Happy Aurora Trails!
Chinxy!
:dude:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,715 Posts
[*]I'm sorry to have to admit that I've run into nepotism at a couple of IPMS shows. While I've raised an eyebrow more than once at some of the WonderFest judging, I'm not familiar enough with the judges to make a similar claim. Pretty much with any contest, "ya pays yer money an' ya takes yer chances."

Anyone who wants to enter their work in model competitions has to have a thick skin. Your work is going to be judged by others, regardless of which system is used. Judging is a subjective process so, unless you're positive of some skullduggery, you have to trust in the honesty and competence of the judges. Personally, I've found that competition has helped me become a better modeler but I'm aware that it's not for everyone.
I don't think I have seen anything close to nepotism in the WF judging.
But I do have the distinct feeling that some judges have an eye for certain things. And some modelers know this and build to catch those judges eyes.
And yeah, you have to have a bit of a 'wow' factor to push the kit from silver to gold.
I generally have no qualms with the gold awards. They are usually the same ones I pick out in the contest that will probably get them, or at least be close.

And yeah, I agree on the thick skin.
For me, my approach is that I don't really enter to win.
I put kits on the table to show them off. I don't need an award to validate my finished work.
Half my entries are there, just because they are done. I have no illusions to their quality. They, quite simply are not up to snuff. But I still had fun building them, and I still enjoy seeing them on my shelf
Though I do appreciate when the blood, sweat, and tears I put into a kit gets recognized.
The ones I truly bust my butt on, and think they are really good. It is a bit disappointing when they don't get anything. But it is such a rush when they do.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,010 Posts
I confess to being a bit of a trophy hound - after all, it is a rush when your work gets recognition. I think that's because the judges don't owe the contestants anything (in a fairly run contest, that is). Therefore the modelers are getting an honest and dispassionate appraisal of their abilities, which is the main reason I feel that competition has helped me grow as a modeler. Plus, in exchange for hundreds of hours of work and as many miles driven to and from the shows, I get to take home some nifty two dollar plaques! :tongue:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,715 Posts
For me, contests are motivation to actually get something done.
Without the deadline of the contest coming up, I might never finish anything.

But yeah, it does push you to do better work as well.
My skills have improved exponentially since I started entering kits and trying to better my entries.
Heck, I even like painting the darn things now.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top