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Discussion Starter #1
I've finally decided that for the community build I am going to try and tackle KitKong's Model Mansion Kit, "Teenage Werewolf", sculpted by Casey Love. These pics are taken of the kit right out of the box this evening...I haven't even washed the parts,yet...just dusted them off a bit so I wouldn't get Styrofoam all over the backdrop (a.k.a. my bedspread). A few things worth mentioning right away-
This kit appears to be made from cold-cast...not a biggie...I just wasn't expecting it.
This kit is HUMONGOUS. The box and the website say it's 1/6 scale, but it's way bigger than that. Even though the figure is doing the splits AND crouching, it measures about 10 inches tall. I used a dressmakers tape and found that standing straight up the kit would be about 15 inches tall.
The base is 13 inches wide at it's widest point, by 8 inches across. I believe this is easily 1/4 scale...1/5 at the very smallest. Again, no problem...I just wasn't expecting it.
Obviously this isn't meant to be a dead on likeness of the Michael Landon teenage werewolf, but more like a stylized version of the character. I may even do his jacket in my old school colors!
Thanks to MonsterModelMan for suggesting a community build..this should be fun!

Ben













 

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This looks like a cool kit! I've never seen a build-up of this one!

Can't wait to see your version with your paint slinging skills!

MMM
 

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This will be one to watch for sure Ben. You know I don't think I ever saw the movie but I knew about it. You may have to restock your primary paint colors for a kit this big!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Doesn't have to look like Michael Landon to look spooky (though if his werewolf had a hairdo like the one Landon wore in Little House on the Prairie it could only help). Have at it, Septi'!
Yeah, dude definitely had a head of hair back in the "Little House" days...LOL

Ben
 

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Discussion Starter #8
OK, I primed the base at least with Rust-Oleum Specialty Plastic Primer.




Also, found some minor spots on the base that will nead some repair...nothing major..just a few tiny holes and a few chips...and a few places that need sanded.









I'll be using Amazing Sculpt to correct these minor problems, along with some 400 and 600 grit sand paper.



I'm not really using a brand name smoothing solution...I just use denatured alcohol. I got this 1 quart container for about 5 bucks at either Wal-mart or Meijer.



More to come.....


Ben
 

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septimuspretori, as somebody that's just getting back into the hobby I appreciate the fact that you're showing photos of the products that you're using in your build! I'm looking forward to seeing the base after the repair work is done!
 

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Hey, I have that same denatured alcohol and it is not in the liquor cabinet! That amazing sculpt, do you mix two halves to use it? Primer certainly lets you see any imperfections as well as priming the piece.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Hey, I have that same denatured alcohol and it is not in the liquor cabinet! That amazing sculpt, do you mix two halves to use it? Primer certainly lets you see any imperfections as well as priming the piece.
Yeah, Amazing Sculpt is a two part sculpting medium.

Ben
 

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...This kit is HUMONGOUS. The box and the website say it's 1/6 scale, but it's way bigger than that...
That's one of my pet peeves when it comes to figure kits--the quoted scales are generally a "ball park" guesstimate at best.

I've been indecisive about whether or not to get this kit myself. I like the sculpt, but the size puts me off a bit because I have limited display space.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
That's one of my pet peeves when it comes to figure kits--the quoted scales are generally a "ball park" guesstimate at best.

I've been indecisive about whether or not to get this kit myself. I like the sculpt, but the size puts me off a bit because I have limited display space.
If space is at a premium, this is not the kit for you. Look at it this way, in shear girth, it's about 1.5X bigger than the Polar Lights 1/4 scale Wolf Man kit.

Ben
 

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Discussion Starter #14
While I'm waiting for the putty to dry, I want to drill some holes so I can pin this guy to his base for extra support...he seems like he will be top heavy. So I just used these finger drills (because I like the control I have with them as apposed to a hand drill or Dremel.)



and I drilled the following holes-









More later,

Ben
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Ben, the thought of sinking pins into a kit has always been a bit intimidating to me. How are you making sure that the pins will line up?
That's the very reason I usually use finger drills. In most cases, I can just hold the two parts together and drill through both parts. Sometimes I tape them (like on an arm or something) until I get the drill sufficiently through both parts.

Ben
 

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...How are you making sure that the pins will line up?
Cap,


It's not very hard and there are several ways to go about it.
  1. Just hold the parts or assemblies together and start drilling, as Ben is doing. He'll need to use tape or something to make sure they stay lined up properly. And he may find it pretty tiring to use pin vises to twist the drill through all that resin. An electric drill or rotary tool like a Dremel would make the job much easier. It would also be faster and therefore reduce the likelihood of the parts becoming misaligned before Ben finishes drilling. After the parts have been pinned he can putty over the hole from the outside.
  2. Alignment marks are a common way of lining up holes. You set the parts in position, then run pencil lines across the joint from one part to the other on four sides. Now, when the parts are separated, each has four marks that end where the joint was. You take a straightedge and line up the marks on opposite sides, then pencil the line between the two. After you do this with the second set of marks, you'll have a "crosshair" on the mating surface. The point where the two lines intersect is the spot where you'll drill the hole for your pin. Since the alignment marks were made on each part when they were in position, the holes will be lined up correctly. Still, I always drill them a little larger than the diameter of the pin for "wiggle room".
  3. Here's another method I use when I need to attach something to a flat surface, usually a figure to a base: first I drill holes for my pins into the figure's feet. Next I apply a layer of masking tape to the bottoms of the feet, making sure that the tape protrudes out from under the sides, and punch through the tape into the holes. I position the figure on the base and apply tape down over the upturned tape that's protruding from under the feet. Now I carefully peel the figure off the tape, which is still stuck to the base. Since I punched those holes out earlier, I have a template made of tape that shows me exactly where to drill the into the base for the pins (but I still drill for "wiggle room"). ;)
Pinning is a very useful addition to your bag of tricks. I do it often, even with styrene models as well as resin and vinyl figures. You'll get the hang of it fast.
 

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Uhhhh --- so you're drilling through both parts at the same time? And then you have to seal over the exterior drill hole? Sorry if that sounds like a stupid question, but like I said, I've never done it before.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Uhhhh --- so you're drilling through both parts at the same time? And then you have to seal over the exterior drill hole? Sorry if that sounds like a stupid question, but like I said, I've never done it before.
Yes..that's exactly it...and it's not a stupid question. Let's see if this demonstrates it easier, since I have photos of it...it's a different model..but shows the technique-

Here the hole has been drilled straight through the arm and into the body. In this instance, I also used pin vises, because I like the control better. Took all of 10 minutes to drill the ones I did in the Teenage Werewolf model. There are times I use a Dremel or electric drill...just depends on the situation.



In this next photo, you can see where the pin has been inserted through the hole, and runs through both the arm and body.



And what Mark said about "wiggle room" is EXTREMELY IMPORTANT. The next two photos demonstrate wiggle room. It's important to leave this room whether you are using the pinning method I used here, or the cross hair method, or the tape method that Mark described (which-BTW Mark-I found ingenious and will be using soon!).





Ben
 
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