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Discussion Starter #1
I received an extremely chopped up Camaro as part of an eBay purchase. The roof was cut in half, the rear wheel wells were brutally chopped and there was black magic marker all over it. I decided to make a project out of it.
http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o308/T-jetjim/PIC_0340.jpg
At this stage I had already filled in the rear whell wells. I use styrene card stock, cut to fit in the butchered wheel well, crazy glue it in, then cover it with epoxy. Since I knew I would be painting the car, I left the epoxy clear. If I am doing a restoration, I will mix paint to match the car and add it to the epoxy first.
http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o308/T-jetjim/PIC_0341.jpg
Then I can dremel out the wheel wells after the epoxy dries. I can cut them to fit my wheels.
http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o308/T-jetjim/PIC_0343.jpg
I cut to fit a Weird Jack's convertible kit. Once this was epoxied in, I had to thin it out wherever it hit the top of the gear plate. The dash had to be cut off, thinned out and trimmed to fit.
http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o308/T-jetjim/PIC_0346.jpg
I sprayed it metallic teal and used Pactra liquid mask on the interior.
http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o308/T-jetjim/PIC_0348.jpg
Added some stripes, detailed the interior, added a boot and new mustang windshield from RRR and she's ready to race.
http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o308/T-jetjim/PIC_0355.jpg
Jim
 

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:wave: Although I would have used a Camaro w/s you did a great job ! I have An old original TO yl #7 that I converted to a convertible in the '70's in my spare body box.I retained the original w/s & used cardboard & masking tape to make an interior & painted it since in those days there were no "Weird Jack" interiors & my skills were not that developed then.I do not remember if the posts were mashed or not.In the 70's I also converted a Mako Shark with bum posts to a convertible.I retained part of the roof to use as a rollbar.For some odd reason I never did an interior.


Neal :dude:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Neal - I would have used a Camaro windshield but I only had perfectly good ones. Great job on the card stock interior on the firebird. And also a nice job flattening out the rear deck on that Mako.

Jim
 

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Super resto-project! Post a new pic on the chassis, yeah? We'd all love to see it!

Neal, your thumbnail pics have seemingly vanished. Says "Attached thumbnails" but that is all, eh!
 

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Duke Dave of Sealand
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Nice save! good to see old hackers get brought back to glory.. Was pretty apt as I watching the Barret Jackson auction today and Bob Varsa got to talking about thunderjets from Aurora.. nice plug for our hobby..

Dave
 

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Model Murdering
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Old Yeller'

Does everybody have one of those dang crushed yellow camaros layin' around? Jim, I really like the color upgrade. Now I'm re-inspired. Gotta pull that old yeller turd out of the putty box and look at it again. Curse you Jim! If you painted the stripes, how the heck do you keep them from bleeding out the body seams? They look pretty crisp. BH
 

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Great Salvage Job, Good as New . . .

T-jetjim,

Nice, very nice salvage job. Car looks good as new. Really appreciate it when someone takes time to revive what most would toss literally in the trash can. Good show . . .

Cheers,
Jas
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks guys. Bill, I used 1/8th masking tape from Micromark to put a line down the middle. Then I used regular masking tape on either side eyeballing the two stripes. It needed only one pass with the airbursh and the stripes were done. I read somewhere to get the tape off as fast as you can or the paint will wick into the tape, so I do that whenever painting a sharp edge or stripe.
Jim
 

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That's OUTSTANDING... I've always been afraid to try anything that involves putty, but seeing stuff like that makes me want to give it a shot. Lord knows I have enough "repairables" around here...

--rick
 

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Model Murdering
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Putty? Go For it Rick!

ParkRNDL said:
... I've always been afraid to try anything that involves putty.....

--rick
Hey Rick I was afraid too! Are you talking about run of the mill styrene filler putty, or Mike Vitale's create your own color matched technique from scrap bodies? My first attempt at "make your own" was pretty gruesome. :freak: Like any new medium, I got better with practice after gaining some familiarity with the goo and the techniques. Now it's become second nature with little apprehension. I've got a few observations: Learn to dry brush styrene cement, by applying a shine to dull spots like sanded wells, or dull areas where you just cant sand and buff and watch the reaction. Less is more. :thumbsup: Mix the putty by applying a good puddle of liquid cement to the donor body. Use your straight gouge blade to scrape the styrene into the glue puddle and keep rewetting keeping in mind that it becomes unworkable rather quickly. Repeat the process till your first skim is finished. Be sure your plastic to be "puttyfied" is spotless as well as your knives and spreaders. I work on a small mirror and have several clean knives at the ready. Keep a pair of small lint free cloths wetted with thinner on hand for cleaning your tools and glass between each application. This cuts down on the inclusion of contaminants that always seem to occur (on my cars anyway) right on top after sanding. :cry: For spreaders I use whatever exacto suits the job. For larger spreads, or one that requires some flexibility that the exacto cant provide, an old auto feeler guage set provides the necassary "spatula" with just a little trimming. Pre-wetting the repair prior to skimming is crucial for a good bond. Mix the mud good so that the styrene is fully dissolved. If it gets sticky just rewet it. Once you get the hang of spreading you can attempt to gently float out the repair with a loaded brush of cement before the mud really starts to set up. It's a lot like trying to control a puddle of metal when gas welding or brazing. It really cuts down on the sanding and subsequent pinholes, especially if your mud was a bit dry or starts to set up. Think of it like liquid sanding or an eraser. Most importantly, let each application cure thoroughly. I've learned the hard way that 24 hrs is the minimum for reapplications, and 48 to 72 hrs minimum before grinding or sanding. :( Be aware that most all major repairs will shrink and require additional applications depending on how thick of a repair was made and the styrene to solvent ratio. Finish sanding should only be done wet! I use a little dish soap in warm water to maximize paper life and keep it from clogging. Since I've learned to float out my repairs I dont use 320 much anymore, but it's good for roughing out a body that somebody "HarryHighSchooled" with 80. Sand and feather the repair with 600 till you like it, or backup and start at 320 if you really goobered it up. After 600 is time to reglaze/float the repair with diluted putty if its pinholed or low, and repeat sanding with 600 when properly cured. If your happy with things then make the jump to 1200. Sand and feather the repair again, but dont make more work for yourself by getting into areas that will be OK with 1500! Remember before moving up a grade in paper to leave your last strokes on an angle perpendicular to the horizontal line of the body. That way you have a guide to see whether you've removed the scratches from the previous grade of paper. They "will" show when you buff! :rolleyes: With 1500 cut in the direction of the body lines, it's OK to cross grain, but finish in the nose to tail direction. For buffing I just use automotive compounds cuz thats what I got. It works fine. Remember to use clean cloths and change the cloth between stages. I use old terry tube socks. Wash the body well between stages. I've been using Meguires #9 Scratch and Swirl remover for a final rub with good success. There's no way to crank one out fast due to the cure times involved, until you get to the sanding and buffing. I do one step every coupla' days. Reapplications are no big deal and only take a few minutes to do. The sanding/finishing is tedious, but can be accomplished in an hour or two. Roughly in total time it's about 25% for prep/repair, 70% sanding, and 10% buffing and finish details. Some of the lighter colors are tough to match and just dont blend well. I just overpaint with the closest color available and clearcoat em'. This all sounds daunting, but once you get the tricks down it 's pretty quick and easy except for the waiting. After you learn to do body cracks, wheel wells, screw and windshield posts; sectioning and grafting comes pretty easy. Rick, I've seen that you can plunge a hummin' dremel into a brand new body. This will be easy once you try it ! :thumbsup: Bill
 

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Another beater sees another day of track time!

Good for you, Bill!

I really like the colour-combo, as well!

You do fine work, friend! :thumbsup: :thumbsup:


Ps- You shuold do a "pictorial" describing a t-jet wheel repair using the mixed/coloured original plastics--that would be very interesting-


Cheers..
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Bill- thanks for the putty description. I purchased Mike Vitale's book and could never get the putty thing to work. I am using the Testor's cement as required but never seemed to scrpae up enough plastic to get the color into the cement. I end up with pieces of plastic floating in the cement. I scraped the body before adding cement which I thought was the instruction. Do you put the cement in to soften the surface to be scraped? This would explain my prior failure with putty.
I try to match paint, which is a real challenge, especially when it chages color after I mix it with epoxy. I would much rather do the putty thing.
When you say "rewet" it, are saying to add more cement?

Jim
 

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Model Murdering
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More poop on putty

Hi Jim, I read Vitales book and produced a prototype "Swamp Thing GTO" as well. :p The book is great, but the written word cant provide the nuances of OJT. Obviuosly a video would have brought much to light. In my zealous lack of hubris, I failed to aknowledge the fact that I didnt know jack about how to control liquid plastic! Yes! Do put the cement on the plastic and let'er eat. Keep adding liquid cement and scraping. It will take some time for the nasties in the cement to activate the plastic. Your blade(I use a 3'8 flat gouge) must be "trauma center" sharp. You have to really scrape and work it! It should sound like scraping your fingernails on a chalkboard. :freak: The real truth I maybe neglected, and they dont tell ya , Is that you dont really get what I'd call a full spreader of mud. You have to go little bits at a time and repeat the process due to the quick flash rate of the cement. In the words of comedian Steve Martin "You have to get small". It's all relative, your scale skims are 1/87th smaller and they set up 87 times faster. LOL. The window of oppurtunity between the activation of the plastic and it becoming unworkably stuck to your knife is small. It's more like "chinking" mortar into a chimney than spreading frosting on a cake. Once you've got the first spread applied, brush on (rewet) liquid cement and again wait just a moment for it to activate then gently smooth it out with the brush. Rewet judiciously! Dont just throw a gallon of cement on the repair and soup it out. Sneak up on it by adding just a bit of cement at a time till it reactivates. Even though it's flashed off, there's still plenty of residule cement in your repair to attain a workable mixture. Then run away! Put the project aside while it cures properly. I cant stress that enough. It has to cure and shrink before you go after it again. Mike was pretty specific about cure times and I didnt listen. Remember to use the cement from a separate container or you'll dye the whole bottle. After re-reading my post I realized that I omitted the trick of the tale; which is learning to control the combined plastic/liquid cement's activation and flash rate by gently rewetting within the window of oppurtunity. It's most important to have all your tools and supplies with extra clean blades at the ready. I recommend taking an old body and doodling around a bit before soloing. Keep cutting off chunks and putting them back together, until you can float out a repair. Practice, Practice, Practice! The whole liquid plastic thing is a can-o-corn when compared to the finish work. Good Luck and keep us all posted. Bill
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks Bill. I'll give it another try. I had given up, but would prefer to use authentic colored plastic vs. mixed paint. (Although I have had some pretty darn good matches if I do say so my self). Off white has been a disaster to match, so I'll get after those botched jobs with this technique.
Jim
 

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on my 1/64 cobra quater panel replacement ,i put the new pieces in and glued them with super glue gel,once they set up good and strong ,i mixed up some automotive bondo,works great and once contoured ,you can wet sand it with 1500 wet o dry and the body work is baby smooth.very easy to work with and strong. :thumbsup:
 

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Guess I gotta try that stuff. I really like the idea of using Mike Vitale's technique to get color-matched plastic goo... but I keep seeing visions of the bodywork I did on my old 1:1 Chevelle as a kid... it looked kinda like I pitched the bondo at the quarters from across the street... :lol:

--rick
 

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Thank you Bill and Jim! Grinding 'em up was easy, bringing them back is another story. I have puttered around with puttying, and the write up is very helpful. I am staring now at a nice old Willys with a very minor wheel well shave that will be my guinea pig - just have to finish removing thick blue paint. You could measure the thickness with a school ruler, and I expect to find a time capsule among the air pockets. It was a racer, but I can't figure out why someone put machined gears in the chassis, then added high CoG weight with half a bottle of testors......
 
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