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As a diecast collector I often wonder what these cars will be worth in the coming years. They seem like a very good investment.....if you get the right ones. I check eBay completed items and see what stuff sells for and its crazy sometimes. I see many cars that I paid $2.99 or $3.99 for in the late 90's, early 2000's, and they are selling for $15, $20, $30 each. Sometimes I wonder if I should get a bunch of certain cars, sit on em for years, and see what they do. I'm really into the "Gassers"....55 Bel Air, Jerry Rigged Nova, Strip Demons set, etc. When I see what some of the 55 Bel Air Gassers sell for, I wish I would have bought a bunch a few years ago. 2 months ago when the Holley Gasser showed up on eBay, they were selling for $30 each give or, take, then eBay got flooded with em, huge lots of them showed up, and you can get em for around $5-$6 each in lots. So, years from now when the Holley gasser shows up on eBay, maybe it might sell for $15 each, kinda like the "Isky Cams" 55 Gasser does. 15-20 years ago I bought over 100 HW "Hall of Fame" 67 Camaro's for $4 each. I sold them all a few years after that for around $5 each. NOW, they are super desirable and selling for around $30 each...wish I would have kept them.
 

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Like in the other thread - do what makes you happy! :thumbsup:

If you can afford the risk of the 'market' also going down - instead of up - and still be happy. 'Then just do it'!. If you cant. Then dont.

Personally the Camaro and Gasser market is supported by the guys who lived it and they are starting to diminish in numbers and will continue to do so for the next 20 to 30 years - that is how life works for all of us.

So ,if you were buying diecast as an investment - then Japanese cars is where you want to be in my opinion. That is a 20 or 30 year market that will continue to grow and expand.

Your results my vary. And I didnt stay at a Holiday Inn last night. :cheers2:
 

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I guess if you're talking about the premium models I could see certain castings being worth more in the future and maybe some mainline castings. Generally from my experience the return on those isn't going to be as much unless it's a mint condition Redline still in the package.

Besides these things are only worth what a collector wants to pay for them. For example I picked up a loose Hot Wheels 1982 Pontiac J-2000 that was in fairly good shape for an almost 38 year old casting. They only made this casting from 1983-84 with 3 different variations. Two variations were yellow but had different sized sun roofs. I paid $5 for a yellow Made In Hong Kong one with the larger sun roof. Now if you can find the green variation that was only available in Canada those are selling for almost $300 mint still in the blister card. Would I pay $300 for it? No but someone probably will. ;)
 

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The OPs post included both the main lines and the premiums. @Diecaster62 seems to be focused on the premiums. No one has specifically talked about the rTH or $TH - chase pieces as of yet.

In my minds 'World of Diecast' the color variations and rTH and $TH are more comparable to the arts and antiquites market as far as value and investment goes. They being rarer (so to speak). Unique in comparison to other castings and sometimes even ugly - which has its own collecting appeal and levels of desire to many.

From there you can take @5thGenCamaro's adage and go with Buy (many) low. Sell (one) higher. Then sell (another one even) higher.

Or buy (one) low. Sell (it) high. Buy (another one) lower (than that). And then sell (it even) high(er than the first.)


Mine own process is buy low. Sell high. Buy a Corvette casting! :D
 

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To me I collect hotwheels because I enjoy them. I don't collect them for how much value they go far or to make money on them or for how much they're worth. Because I'm never planning on selling any of my hotwheels. I will be keeping all of my hotwheels with me for the rest of my life and I will be collecting hotwheels for the rest of my life. And I open up most of my hotwheels both basics and premiums. Because to me I enjoy them a whole lot better loose than in the package. The only ones I have that are still in the package are the ones that have been sign by the hotwheels designer's. And the ones you have to unscrew to open them up. Otherwise all of my other hotwheels are all loose. So to me people should not be collecting hotwheels if they're planning on selling them in the future thinking they're gonna get lots of money on them. To me that's not Wright. Because to me that reminds me of scalpers going out to the stores taking whatever hotwheels that they go put up on Ebay to resell to make lots of money. To me the only people that should be collecting hotwheels or any diecast are the ones that enjoy them not to resell them in the future to make lots of money.
 

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I'm not so sure how good of an "investment" Hot Wheels cars will be? They're hot right now and I can see a definite increase across the board on the stuff I've picked up over the past few years, but it could go the other way pretty fast. Back about 15 years ago I was collecting football cards and that seemed like a great investment, and I did invest ALOT!......then 2008 came. The bottom dropped out of the card market, I and everyone else liquidated, and I lost my shirt. Some things I was able to recover my money on, but overall it was a losing proposition. Lesson learned. Sitting on stuff long term, like the 55 Gassers, might not be a good strategy. They're red hot now but thats not gonna last forever. I have a complete collection and I haven't let any of mine go just yet, but I don't see how the Candy Striper can get much higher.
 

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I figure if you want to make money selling Hot Wheels, you have to sell them while they are still the "Flavor of the Month"


Sure maybe 1 or 2 castings will increase over time, but will it be the ones you bought????
 

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My advice: Don't do it.

When people turn a hobby in to a business, very few people actually come out ahead. What might be hot today can turn ice cold in a few months/years. Trying to speculate on a particular item will make you acquire a large amount of a certain thing. Down the road, you may end up with a gold mine, but more likely you will have a large quantity that will make you ask why you bought so much.

I suggest watch these couple of videos that talk about investing in Magic the Gathering cards. While it's a different product, the same advice still applies. This guy was a professional investment banker and has a really good understanding of the economy, market trends, speculation and other aspects of investing.





 

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My Opinion / Two Cents Worth?

Don't do it if you expect to make money from me.

My ABSOLUTE TOP PRICE for a Hot Wheels is $4.00, and that's for a Treasure Hunt
which I normally don't go for anyway the way they are priced on-line these days.
For a common Mainline, $0.75 to $1.00 is my top price. If they are above that, you can
keep it.
Hot Wheels are like everything else....(1) they are worth what someone will give
you for it; and (2) in my opinion, just because it's OLD DON'T MAKE IT PRICELESS in my book!
>:)
 

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I'll give you a little hint. MOST diecast models, especially in "1:67 - ish" scale, aren't worth much more than you paid for them. Majorette, Maisto, Ertl, Matchbox, Johnny Lightening and the "sophisticated" M2Machines easily fall into this category. Some are made to be collectible but ALL are made to ensure they never appreciate in value. M2Machines? 15-20 varieties at a production run of 60,000 to 100,000 each!

I've displayed, collected and stored Hot Wheels (plus those listed above) from the 1980s, the 90s and the turn of the century. So my newest ones are +/-20 yrs old. I paid .49, .59, .89 cents or so. So now they're worth a couple bucks. Not even worth the effort to put them on eBay. The ones from the 80s - 40 yrs ago - maybe a little more. But I enjoyed them.

BUT you can invest in diecast model cars that will appreciate. But it's a different world then the one most of us exist in and collect in. You pay mega bucks for the model. Say a poor man's $250+ 1:43 model. And yes they've appreciated over the years. 1:18 scales hit the stratosphere. People do collect them but they're way beyond my pocketbook. I remember 6-7 yrs ago bidding on a 20-25 yr old 1:18 1930s Alfa MIB. As the price neared $1000 I said to myself, "what the..." That was it for me.

Naturally you need to zero in on the desired model. But at this level such desired models popularity doesn't change with the weather like cheaper models do. There always is a market for a Cunningham C4RK or a Mercedes Benz W196, etc.

OK, now I'm getting off my soapbox. LOL !!!
 

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if you think you are going to make money from hot wheels diecast.here a few things you will have to do:

give up your present job.

become a full time dealer.have a large bank roll.

travel around,usually to other states because you have already purchased all the local collections, and buy collections.

realize that you will have to carry other brands besides hotwheels.which means more investment capitol.

maintain your offers on ttp-ebay and other sales venues.trips to the post offices to mail purchases.

set up at various toy shows.which includes travel,hotel,food and other expenses.

yes there are pieces that have gone up in value.but on a whole 99 + % of diecast is not worth what it originally cost.
 

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Like the stock market, things can change for the better and for the worst regarding the value of Hot Wheels, premium or mainline.
It all depends on what you are able to find, and the condition it is in.
The 55 Gasser was mentioned as something to look into, but the OP said a key word that puts things into perspective "MAYBE".
Also mentioned in one of the posts, you need to find a buyer for it and have someone pay what you are asking. That is where negotiating can come into play.
There are mainlines that have retained their value over the years, and some of those are very tough to find, so a lot of homework and research has to be involved.
One that comes to mind that went up then down almost as quick was the Beatles Yellow Submarine. Tough to find at first, went for stupid money on E-bay at first, couldn't be found very much at retail at first.
Then it came out in later mixes and it was everyplace and the value dropped like a rock.
Then there are the variations mainlines that have retained value, to some people a variation doesn't mean a thing. To others, me included, it does. And depending on what you want for it, a vari collector might be interested.
A good example is the 66 Batmobile #15 from 2007 with 5 hole wheels. Very tough to find even now. It has been valued over $20-30.
There is a lot to take in and there would need to a decent amount of money involved.
The pegs at Wally and Target are from time to time full of returns "investors" have brought back because they weren't getting what they had hoped for.
 

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Interesting reads when this topic comes up. Its probably safe to say that no two collections are identical
and we like to think at least the initial money investment can always be recovered if needed. The time
spent is another story like Pegers was saying. On that note, for almost 20 years I have been sifting through
eBay auctions with thousands of hours and transactions that have been spent. Had a few really good hits,
one lot of 7 cars paid 100 bucks and resold them separately for over a thousand. Another example is paid 150
for a lot of 48 and sold one car for 510. These deals are far and few between and in the end my time spent is
probably worth less than a penny an hour. In addition the profit monies goes into my personal collection and
the rest is right back into the hobby, labor of love. Summing that all up, there are so many other options
available for investment that are far more profitable when the time spent is figured into the equation.

Cheers
Eric
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
The Holley Gasser will eventually dry up on eBay just like the "Isky Cams" 55 Gasser. The Isky Gasser seems to bring around $15 shipped. The Holley gasser should bring the same in a few years hopefully. I bought large lots of Holley Gassers, and Jerry Rigged Novas. You can get em fairly cheap in large lots. I'll sit on them for a couple years, see what happens. When AutoWorld comes out with some stuff, I try to buy a few extras. They just released some square body Chevy pickups....there is a green 73 stepside that I believe will double in value very quickly as it will be sold out soon. I have the green one, also the red one, just got em friday. If I had the $$$$, I would order 100 of those green ones. Their wagons do well also. I wish I would have bought 100 of the "Lead Sled" wagons....was $6 when new, now its worth $50. Well, to me its a fun hobby, and if the cars hold their value or go up some, thats a plus.
 
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