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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Does anyone have experience in building an asphalt oval? Does the asphalt have to be put on top of concrete? Or can you just lay thick asphalt down? What is needed to make it a great track. Drive line, etc?
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Spelling:)

Does anyone have experience in building an asphalt oval? Does the asphalt have to be put on top of concrete? Or can you just lay thick asphalt down? What is needed to make it a great track. Drive line, etc?
I just realized I spelled asphalt incorrectly. You still get the idea:tongue:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Good Information

I'm interested in a flat oval. I've ran on 180 foot drive line tracks and it was a blast, but I was thinking a little bigger would have been nice. Also, wanted the option to put road course in the center.

So it looks like a very flat compacted dirt surface to lay down 2 to 4 inches of asphault is the way to go. Any other opinions?
 

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I'm interested in a flat oval. I've ran on 180 foot drive line tracks and it was a blast, but I was thinking a little bigger would have been nice. Also, wanted the option to put road course in the center.

So it looks like a very flat compacted dirt surface to lay down 2 to 4 inches of asphault is the way to go. Any other opinions?
Your surface (base) needs to be adapted to the climate you're in. I'd say you need at least 8 inches of a good crushed ¾'' minus crushed stone no matter where you are, it helps drainage alot to have this versus plain dirt. You need to go deeper if you're in an area that sees any freeze-thaw cycles in the winter/spring months, or if you're in an area that see lots of rain. Remember, a crappy base will ruin 4'' of asphalt, but 2'' of asphalt on a good base will go a long way and will cost you about the same.
 

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Your surface (base) needs to be adapted to the climate you're in. I'd say you need at least 8 inches of a good crushed ¾'' minus crushed stone no matter where you are, it helps drainage alot to have this versus plain dirt. You need to go deeper if you're in an area that sees any freeze-thaw cycles in the winter/spring months, or if you're in an area that see lots of rain. Remember, a crappy base will ruin 4'' of asphalt, but 2'' of asphalt on a good base will go a long way and will cost you about the same.

:thumbsup::thumbsup:
 

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Your surface (base) needs to be adapted to the climate you're in. I'd say you need at least 8 inches of a good crushed ¾'' minus crushed stone no matter where you are, it helps drainage alot to have this versus plain dirt. You need to go deeper if you're in an area that sees any freeze-thaw cycles in the winter/spring months, or if you're in an area that see lots of rain. Remember, a crappy base will ruin 4'' of asphalt, but 2'' of asphalt on a good base will go a long way and will cost you about the same.
He should know...it's what he does! Hi Pat!:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Good ideas

All good ideas. I'm in AZ, so not much rain or freeze, but I agree the better the base the better the track will be.
 

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All good ideas. I'm in AZ, so not much rain or freeze
Another consideration then, is heat..
Parts of Arizona are pretty darn hot all the time.
(you didn't mention where..)
Concrete may be a 'cooler' alternative.
While asphalt certainly 'gives' more than concrete,
your area is not subject to salt/freeze/thaw cycles,
which is the death penalty for concrete..
Asphalt in high temp/mega sun areas, is going to be HOT

Just another thought....
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Heat

I was also thinking about having a cover over the track. This could keep everyone from cooking eggs on it:)
 

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Storm steel was over 140 deg with a 100+ deg day. makes it hard to gear by temp since the track warms up the tires, motors and chassis so much. I cant imagine how hot a track would be in AZ mid day. You would have to do night races.
 

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Have you been to HobbyTown GILBERT on a Saturday Night?

(For those who haven't been to the HobbyTown Gilbert AZ races)

It's a shopping center parking lot - not real smooth - not great lighting - temporary track set up on Saturdays most of the year - draws over 100 entries most nights - most of the guys HAVE A BLAST.

Entry fees are cheap - guys run multiple classes and EVERYTHING you can think of runs (On-Road and Oval...even Short Course w/ some jumps)

It's been this way for some 20+ years (26 I believe)

SEVERAL other tracks have come into the Phoenix area - and have GONE as well.

Dennis Crippen runs the races w/ hand scoring using FUZZY Dots held to the windshields w/ velcro (No TRANSPONDERS HERE)

...The racers (the majority) are GRASS ROOTS Racers who would NOT race very often at a "Serious" Hi Tech track - The "Serious" Racers have tried to get things to fly at the old RC Sports Mania track (now close...and it was an AWESOME track) - and over in Scottdale @ SRS they had a nice piece of asphalt for an oval/road course. Former owner tried to do oval - numbers never did much - current owner had the asphalt resurfaced and made very nice - STILL no participation - so NOW it's covered with DIRT - DIRT OVAL RACING @ SRS! which goes with their OFF ROAD TRACK (Home of the CACTUS CLASSIC)

Phoenix and Tucson use to have some VERY competitive Paved Oval Racers -- the guys are still there -- interests have changed I believe...hard to say how many would migrate back (if that's that target market)

The guys up in FLAGSTAFF run in a nice parking lot, if you haven't checked them out.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

COMING LABOR DAY WEEKEND -
The KIMBROUGH 400 @ Papa Lou's A MAIN RACEWAY
www.Kimbrough400.com


 

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Discussion Starter #16
AZ track

Thanks "swtour". I'm one of those grass roots racers that actually started racing at rc sports mainia and at hobby town gilbert. I know the pitfalls that each of those tracks had and have currently. I think what is missing in AZ, is a dedicated paved oval and road coarse that is the appropriate size, prepped appropriately, dedicated (not a parking lot), newbie classes, and a cool, friendly environment. Each of the tracks have some of these characteristics, but it seems not one track has them all. I think hobby town gilbert gets a lot of racers, because of the location and the entry cost. I race there every week, and I have at least five people come by and ask me questions about how to get started in racing. There needs to be a gateway class that is advertised (marketed) as a beginner class that is cheap (relatively) and that doesn't allow just anyone that has been in the hobby for many years enter it. Give the new guys a chance:)

I personally didn't go to the SRS paved oval track, because it was a lot further from my house, it was small, the entry fee was three times higher, track wasn't the smoothest, etc. There were some other factors that my friends told me about the track that were not optimal.

The dirt oval track SRS built on top of the paved oval could become big for them. I loved racing dirt oval at sports mania and will be checking out the SRS track soon. I wish it was a bigger track - there isn't much room left over at SRS witht he cactus track.

On a side note, I loved the paved oval track that was at the tucson hobbytown. They held the paved oval nationals there a few years for which I attended and did well. It was a dedicated track, but the dust from the dirt track and the wind made it some times difficult. I think if the track would have been covered and there were some block walls around at least two sides of the track, it would have been much better.

I want to eventually build the ideal track and hobby shop to host many races and put AZ on the map for premier rc racing.
 

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Hey I too loved the OLD track at HT Tucson - what was that...on 22nd St. I believe.

I was @ the NORRCA Paved Nat's the year it was there - I was working with or for NORRCA at the time.

Always wanted to run on Adam's other paved oval on Speedway, but never could get guys to commit to getting the surface clean enough and tacked up to make the drive from CALIF.

I did put on a couple races at Sports Mania and have to say, WISHED I could have done a lot more.

(Hated the direction the drivers area faced, and the sun bouncing off the block wall - but LOVED that track)

Good Luck - and if/when you get it done... I'll try to get there a time or two. (Still have relatives in the PHX area)
 

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Your asphalt track is only as smooth as your sub grade and AB course.

Sub grade and AB course:
First you want to rip out about 4” and re-compact it to a compaction of 95% to 103%. Make sure it’s graded well. Once that is done then you want to do add 5” of an AB course to help strengthen the asphalt and compact it to a rate of 95% to 103%. Anything over 103% you will be crushing the stone in the AB course and defeat the purpose for the compaction. Since the AB course is the last of the dirt work you want it to be graded as smooth as possible. Any bumps in the AB course can reflect through the asphalt. It might not show up right away but over the years a small bump will start to show up.

Asphalt:
For the asphalt part you want a min of 2”. The reason for a min of 2” is that it’s easier to compact and the rollers wont over compact make the stone in the asphalted to be crush. A dense grade of asphalt is good as a bottom 2” lift but does not drain well. A 2” top open grad asphalt lift (i.e. mostly 3/8” or 1/4” aggregate size) will help drain the track fast and there is no need to have a large slope to the track. Also it the track will have more bite than a dense grade. You can pretty much make the track flat.

The thicker the asphalt lifts the better chance of smoothing out any bumps from the bottom asphalt lifts or from the dirt work. Also it will take a long time for any bumps to reflect on the top lift of the asphalt.*Another thing to think about is where in the track you want your joints since a paver can only go out to 22’ or smaller. Having wider ribbons made by the paver will create more bumps due to the paver working harder. The smaller the ribbon like 14’ will have fewer bumps caused by the paver. Yes rollers can get most of the bumps out but not all bumps. Back to the joints in the asphalt, joints can become a problem a yrs down the road. The paving crew might over lap the joint causing a bump or yrs (8-10 or so yrs) down the road a crack will start to open. An easy fix is to crack seal it but a bump is the worst thing to have at the joint areas.

Rollers:
The heavier the roller like 10 tons is better than a 1 ton. Just a roller won’t cut it to compact the asphalt down and beat down some of the bumps. A vibrating roll will help in the area of taking out any bumps in the lift. Then a static roller can be your finish roller.
 
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