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Hi,I would like some opinions on brush painting acrylics.The way I brush them is use very thin coats and start at one side of what I'm painting and do one stroke all the way down then start again at the top next to the stroke I already done and continue this procedure until I'm finished what I'm painting.My favorite acrylics are Polly Scale and Testors Acryl,also can you mix custom colors with acrylics.If anyone knows a proper mehod of flowing on acrylics,please offer me some advice,I'd like to try it successfully,Thanks,Guy Schlicter.
 

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I wish I had something to offer. I am battling the use of brushing Tamiya acrylics. There's only a couple things I've concluded so far:

1) keep a little cup-let of clean acrylic thinner (I use the thinner from the same mfgr. as the paint I"m using) and frequently dip the brush in it then brush the brush off on some paper towel kept in your lap for this purpose. Keeping the brush clean seems to help with paint control.

2) thin the stuff down for brushing. A lot. You'll have to apply multiple coats, but unless you're doing a VERY small part where you can apply one coat of thick paint without worrying about brush strokes, you'll have to apply multiple thin layers.

3) learn airbrushing. So far I can't say that using acrylics with brushes is any better than Testors enamels. I'm almost tempted to say it's worse as the thinner in acrylics seems to evaporate faster than that in the Testors, so the testors is more easily touched up / restroked.
 

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Once you get the hang of painting with acrylics, it's much easier than enamels and much easier on the brush and nose :) Are you priming the model first? and if so, with what? Also, there is a philosophy of painting that the color can shange a lot of space as long as the value or hue is not too separated. You can also use complimentary colors to add interest. As for the smoothness, you can use things besides a brush. The softer the brush, the better the 'flow' control. I've always enjoyed a series seven sable brush. Make sure it comes to a good point though. I never use acrylic thinner, just good old fashioned water. if I want to cover an area for large mass color, I use an airbrush or canned paint and then do some light sanding. I also paint in thin layers almost washes. The good thing also about acrylics is that they can go with a good scrubbing and this is when I'd use a good oil type brush to really get in and scrub out any edges or rough spots. i've also applied acrylics with paper towels, fingers, q-tips etc.
 

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I have heard of a technique where you mix acrylic paint about 3:2 or even 1:1 with Future. Naturally, this means you'll have to apply more coats, but supposedly the Future helps the paint self-level and makes it smooth and gives you more working time. Haven't tried it myself, but it sounds logical enough.

Qapla'

SSB
 

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If you want more drying time to mix or shade the colors (say you're painting a dinosaur's colored skin) then use artist's acrylics in tubes. They're manufactured to use like oil paints but still have a much quicker drying time.
 

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I've gotten into using craft paints lately and I've found that by keeping a small container of water handy, it helps. I dip the brush into the paint, then into the container of water. I gently blot excess off on a paper towel and paint. Seems to work well and I've had little to no problem with brush marks.

An extender will also work, but the water seems easier.

- Fred
 

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It seems your hand painting technique is fine.
Here are a few tips to try out:

Thin the paint a little with water (many acrylics thin well with alcohol or Windex as well).

Rinse out your brush between applications of paint.
After loading your brush with paint, touch the bristles to a damp rag or towel to draw off excess paint.

Apply multiple thin layers with drying time in between rather than a thick layer.

To preserve your paint, use a large shallow plastic storage box with an air-tight lid as a palette. Place a moist paper towel in the bottom and squeeze out your paints onto the towel. When you're done or your painting session is interrupted, snap on the lid and the paint will stay useable for days.

Most importantly, buy good brushes! Sables are nice, very controllable and can hold a lot of paint, but tend to loose resiliency with water-based paints. Sable/synthetic blends are a good compromise.
 

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BatFanMan said:
I've gotten into using craft paints lately and I've found that by keeping a small container of water handy, it helps. I dip the brush into the paint, then into the container of water. I gently blot excess off on a paper towel and paint. Seems to work well and I've had little to no problem with brush marks.

An extender will also work, but the water seems easier.

- Fred
I'm the oposite.
I dip my brush in the water first, then into the paint.
I've found that different textures and areas require different amounts of thinning for coverage (example: sharp edges tend to need to be done with almost straight paint). This method lets me control how thin the paint is with each stroke.

Extenders are great for large surface painting. Lets you keep a "wet edge" a lot longer to avoid brush marks and lines.
 
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