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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Still working on my little Bride. I want to simulate wood on the slab she lies on, but of course there's no grain texture in the sculpt. I've seen some pretty good pictures of people who've made this look VERY realistic.

How do you do this - with oils? I'd like to keep it fairly simple, sticking to acrylics and (if necessary) enamels. Keep in mind I don't have an airbrush. If you start talking about washes, give me some details please because I don't do washes very often. (and when I do, it's just to sort of blur things together and make them look dirty)

All help appreciated!! (and I plan on following the instructions for seam erasure for the bottles - I'm leaving it for last to delay the frustration factor I might encounter . . .

:dude:
 

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What exactly are the instructions for seam erasure for the the bottles? I assume you're talking about the clear plastic bottles, yes?

Sorry I can't help you out on your wood grain question, but I'll definitely be watching this post because I, too, am curious about whatever techniques are out there. I guess the same approach, whatever that turns out to be, would also apply to creating a wood grain look on the guillotine model.
 

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Frankie Boy said:
What exactly are the instructions for seam erasure for the the bottles? I assume you're talking about the clear plastic bottles, yes?
Here's how Markenstein (one of the original BB'ers) did it. He won the big Janus prize at WF 1999 with his kit.Truly awesome!!!

Well here's how I did it.

First I dremeled (yes you can use a dremel for more that saluting) off, from the inside of the bottles, all the locating pins, holes and flange that the pins and holes are on. I also ground off all the ejector pin marks. You also want to open up the tops of the bottles so you can get your syringe in them later. Then I sanded smooth the insides of the bottle. Then using Novus 3 step polish, I polished the insides of the bottles (don't forget the edges). At this point they are almost perfectly smooth and clear. Next I coated the insides with Future Floor wax. This stuff is great. Future removes all tiny scratches and imperfections and leaves a smooth glassy (that's what were looking for) surface.
Now it's time to glue the halves together, harder than it sounds because you removed your locating pins. I used Testors glue. Use it sparingly (so none runs down the insides of the bottle), but use enough so that it seals the bottle. Clamp the bottle and give plenty time to dry. I used Testors because it dries quite clear (when used sparingly) and dries strong. Testors White glue didn't have a strong enough bond, and broke after handling the glued together halves. Tenax is so thin that it ran down the insides of my tediously polished bottles and fogged everything up (arghhh). Super Glue's also fog up the plastic. Bad idea.
Now you have bottles that are super clean and clear on the inside buy still average on the outside.
Take an exacto and gently scrape the seam on the outside. What you're trying to do here is remove any misalignment that happened as a result of removing those locator pins. You need to be careful during this procedure because you don't want anything (scrapings, sanding dust, polish) to fall inside your bottle. Next, hand polish the seam areas to eliminate any "ridge". Close your eyes and see if you can feel any seam. When you have that seam virtually eliminated to the touch, it's time for the next step.
Stick a wire in the hole in the top of the bottle and dip (the bottle) in Future.

There you have it. Once it's dry you will not be able to feel any seams, although you can still sort of see them.

Now, with the boiling flask, I used Micro Mark to seal up the hole in the bottom of the flask. Once that dried I mixed up some Envirotex (a 2 part epoxy) and added some lime green flocking to the mix, to get a soupy lime green concoction. Then I used a good metal needled hobby syringe and sucked up some of the goo, them squirted it in the flask. I then set the flask of a towel in the same position that it would sit on the model. I wanted to ensure that the liquid would dry with the correct fluid line.
Let me tell you, you could still see a tiny seam at this point.
It was after I assembled the model that I weathered the bottles with oils that the seam disappeared. I imagined that the good doctor wasn't very clean, so all my components were a bit sloppy. You could "spill" some of the liquid out the top of the bottle and lightly down the sides to hide what's left of the seams too.

Well, that's how I did it.


I hope this helps Frankie Boy

RK
 

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Frankie Boy said:
Sorry I can't help you out on your wood grain question, but I'll definitely be watching this post because I, too, am curious about whatever techniques are out there. I guess the same approach, whatever that turns out to be, would also apply to creating a wood grain look on the guillotine model.
I've seen a couple of sites where people have "etched" wood grain into their guillotine kit by using a wire brush to scratch/scuff a simulated wood grain into the surface; I imagine that would work just as well on The Bride.
 

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You can also scratch woodgrain into plastics by using the teeth of a modeler's razor saw. Some plastic fuzz is raised up but you can rub that off with fine steel wool and some sanding, if needed. Depending on how you do it you can make it subtle or rough in terms of texture and depth.


Lee
 

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60 or 100 grit sandpaper will also work. It depends on what looks right in that scale.
 

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You can also use a special tool called the "rake brush" to simulate wood grain on flat surfaces. The rake brush has the bristles clustered in segments, so you get spaces where paint won't apply to the surface to be painted. I often use FreakFlex Wooden Stake as a base, and then apply a burnt sienna or burnt umber wash with the rake brush. I suggest practicing on a spare sprue piece to get a feel for how the brush works, etc.


Dr. G.
 

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It's not that hard really. Like doing a real door, ( like on This Old House )
Just relax & take a carefree attitude with it. First look at real wood and decide what wood you want it to be. Then put on the first basic color coat ( the predominant color for the wood ) Let it dry thouroughly. IF it's acrylic, a seal coat of Dullcoat or other flat clear finish will keep you from screwing up later ( blurring or lifting the first coat ) and save work. When dried well, apply a rather thinned-down coat of your lighter color. Then take a fairly wide ( for the size of the "board" ) DRY brush and lightly draw it down the board in the direction of the "grain". "Squiggle" the lines somewhat as you go to get the real effect. Wipe off brush after every 'swipe', and see how the grain develops. Stop when it's to your liking. Don't forget to to the endgrain "vertical" to the floor to get the "short" strokes like a board would look on-end. When that's to your satisfaction, let it set up and go over later with a small brush and paint small "knots" in between some of the larger "squiggles" if you want them. Either in the base color, or an intermediate tone between the base and grain color. Be sure to mix all the 'tones' from the same color "brown" so they are all "related" !! If you want individual "boards' to show, draw a straight line down the second coat while it's still wet, with a toothpick or some other tool, and a ruler, etc., spacing them the width you think the actual boards should be.
I hope this helps. I'm better at woodworking/staining/painting than I am, (or at least was 'til lately) than modeling. Getting advice on this BB has helped ME a lot too.
 

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the Dabbler said:
It's not that hard really. Like doing a real door, ( like on This Old House )
Just relax & take a carefree attitude with it. First look at real wood and decide what wood you want it to be. Then put on the first basic color coat ( the predominant color for the wood ) Let it dry thouroughly. IF it's acrylic, a seal coat of Dullcoat or other flat clear finish will keep you from screwing up later ( blurring or lifting the first coat ) and save work. When dried well, apply a rather thinned-down coat of your lighter color. Then take a fairly wide ( for the size of the "board" ) DRY brush and lightly draw it down the board in the direction of the "grain". "Squiggle" the lines somewhat as you go to get the real effect. Wipe off brush after every 'swipe', and see how the grain develops. Stop when it's to your liking. Don't forget to to the endgrain "vertical" to the floor to get the "short" strokes like a board would look on-end. When that's to your satisfaction, let it set up and go over later with a small brush and paint small "knots" in between some of the larger "squiggles" if you want them. Either in the base color, or an intermediate tone between the base and grain color. Be sure to mix all the 'tones' from the same color "brown" so they are all "related" !! If you want individual "boards' to show, draw a straight line down the second coat while it's still wet, with a toothpick or some other tool, and a ruler, etc., spacing them the width you think the actual boards should be.
I hope this helps. I'm better at woodworking/staining/painting than I am, (or at least was 'til lately) than modeling. Getting advice on this BB has helped ME a lot too.
This is very good advice and it's almost exactly how I achieved this effect...
http://members.aol.com/thebananasplits/othermonsters/clock.html
 

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Thanks for the backup Trendon!
I saw your clock and am extremely jealous !! I should have grabbed one when I could.
BUT, that 'hand-distortion' aspect scared me off somewhat, I am right-handed in the extreme, and have a h--l of a time working with my left. (I can only draw faces looking left, it's that bad )
Now I'm having regrets. BUT, maybe I could ( gently) saw the faces off and ........??
 

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I would just use un-thinned Tamiya acrylic or Testors enamel in a couple of shades of brown. The brush strikes I always end up with look like wood grain :).
 

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the Dabbler said:
Thanks for the backup Trendon!
I saw your clock and am extremely jealous !! I should have grabbed one when I could.
BUT, that 'hand-distortion' aspect scared me off somewhat, I am right-handed in the extreme, and have a h--l of a time working with my left. (I can only draw faces looking left, it's that bad )
Now I'm having regrets. BUT, maybe I could ( gently) saw the faces off and ........??
Thanks Dab.

I would pick up one of these because you'll be happy with the end result.
If you have the tools and can get away with cutting the heads off, do it.
Trust me, you'll be happy that you did.

Thanks,
Mike
 

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THAT is a nice woodgrain, and very apropos the subject matter. !!
 

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The way I did it on my guillotine was to base coat one color brown.
Then I spray painted another brown over top of it.
While that paint was still wet, I just drug an old toothbrush through it to texture it.
Since spray paint sets up pretty quick, it actually leaves the texture in the part. Also some of the under color shows through in a few places giving it a realistic look.
At the smaller scales, woodgrain is more 'hinted at' than really detailed.
At least I belive you shouldn't be able to see every bit of detail on something that small, it just doesn't look real to my eye.

Pics aren't that good (haven't re-shot this one since I got a better camera) but you can kind of see how it turned out.
http://www.geocities.com/tylisaari/revguillotine.html
 

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Nice job Tay, but I'm betting you don't brush your teeth much anymore !
 

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the Dabbler said:
Nice job Tay, but I'm betting you don't brush your teeth much anymore !
:D

That's why I said an old toothbrush.
I have about a dozen of them laying around for different jobs.
 

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While we're talking about this, don't forget that paint isn't our only weapon. Colored pencils and pastels can do a great woodgrain effect. I always find it handy to have a piece of real wood (or marble or whatever material I'm simulating) to reference so that I keep it "real." That helps a lot.

I've also used the "rake" brush that Doctor G mentioned and it worked really well.

Lee
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks for all the ideas, guys! I've actually dremelled some major grain into the plastic -- particularly effective on the 'ends' of the boards.

The steel brush sounds like a good idea as does dragging a toothbrush through the paint to leave grain and expose the other colour beneath.

As always, great ideas! If I'm happy enough with the way this turns out, I might bring it to WonderFest!
:dude:
 
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