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Discussion Starter #1
I am making a mm 67 vette convertable, I used some box stock styrene to fill in the trunk area behind the seats. I am practicing the vitagoo filler to patch the plastic. However as I brush the glue on the seams that are around the trunk the lines are disapearing. What would be a good way to cut them back in? I was thinking to use a hobby saw and scrape them in. I intend on painting the car when done. HELP!!!
 

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You might try using a "line scriber" I believe X-acto makes one..... REALLY handy tool to own. Most well stocked hobby shops should have them in stock :thumbsup:
 

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Model Murdering
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On Vitagoo, seams, and toenails

Well it'd be great to have a pic, but I'll give this a stab.

It works best if you take the time to minimize seam filling when you float an area. Remember that the glue or mix is fluid and can be reactivated within a short period of time. To clean a wet seam use the dry brush technique, it's actually slightly moistened. Stroke out the seam so it's redefined by dragging the excess material out and depositing only the bare minimum of glue. It should be done immediatly. I do this constantly as I'm schlobbering along and never leave an area to dry until the seams are brushed out. Learning to move or remove material with the dry brush is one of the little tricks that can save you some aggravation. Watch your wife, girlfriend, daughter lacquer their nails. They don't know crap about painting, but they move that thick sh#t around on their nails, and smooth it out. The technique is basically like the Vitagoo trick. The only big difference is that you use a variety of mixtures.

Seams will act like gutters for the straight cement. Ordinarily no bigee. I use a darning needle to shape/clean the groove. It's part of my kit. experiment and choose the right one for the given seam. Sometimes you have to drag a blade through a seam first if they're lumpy. This is providing that the seam is good. Excess glue can be removed wet or dry, but I prefer dry as you can skip out of the seam when it's wet/slick and cause a scratch elsewhere. Also dragging a wet seam can distort edges or plunge through the other side. If you've got a serious schlobber of styrene glue mix in a seam I pick out the bulk when wet, dry brush, and do the final correction when dry.

Truthfully I never give it a second thought. As I wet sand and shape between skims I'll clean the seams with my blunt needle. This will raise the edges of the seam so I just make a few passes with the wet paper and continue the process till the seam is clean and the edges are smooth.

Again without a pic it's hard to tell. As a rule I avoid sectioning on a factory seam whenever possible. I'll move my section to a more workable area for a butt joint, then block sand so as to maintain a factory seam whenever possible. I spend all my time in fitting/shaping parts for a precision fit, and very little time actually working with the mix.

If you've goobed a seam, (I do it all the time!) another good trick is to wait a bit till the goo flashes (not sticky) and shape the seam depth with the knife. I block them off later when cured. It helps to wet your knife with glue.

As you get more familiar with the process you'll learn move stuff around using the dry brush trick, rewetting areas and adding material all at the same time.
One of the clues when your on the right track is the correct mixture, for the application. Don't use thick stuff around seams any more than you would try and fill gaps with the thin stuff. Observe and learn to control the surface tension of the goo. Some times I need it to creep and sometimes I need it to stay put. Now that I've been doing this for a year I've learned to float right up to the edge of a seam without falling in. If I do fall in it's fixable in several of the above ways.

Ultimately if you don't like the way something is looking brush it out while it's workable, minimize the carnage and live to goo again. Don't be shy, post a pic so I can see where your having trouble. My stuff always looks frankenstein till it gets blocked a few times.
 

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I was reading a book about Bare-Metal-Foil a couple of years ago and they mentioned a special tool for modeling body lines. I can't remember any more than this. Maybe it was by Exacto? Try searching the web.
 

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body lines..

I have been there also with the filling in the lines. I use a tool I found at my local harbor freight. It is a pick set that looks like dentist tools in such. They have handy little points, nice handles and different angle on each one. Some people like to drag the line so the angles on the tools help for better control. I also have a panel scribber..Got from micro marks for my model cars I custom build. It also works great and a little easier to use than the dentist tools. If your real slick. Use an exacto, #11 blade new, Use the flat dull side and just the edge of the point. Drag slowly along the line and will cut just like the sharp edge..
Hope that what all tells you it helps :thumbsup:
Just takes practice on an old clunker before going to a prime custom. :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
It's not a lot, I can probably wet it then clean it out with the needle. This thread got a lot of good answers, Thanks! Here is a pic of the car before I started filling it in . I'll post some pics soon
 

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T-Jet Racer said:
It's not a lot, I can probably wet it then clean it out with the needle. This thread got a lot of good answers, Thanks! Here is a pic of the car before I started filling it in. I'll post some pics soon
Hi TJR, That's what I wanted to see. If you look way back in the cowpie XKE thread, you'll see the tonneau/carapace part.

The fill piece was first lightly glued from below using an "L" relief notch around the edge. Once the position was fixed the lower side was filled with the thick stuff taking care not to work/push it through the topside.

After that set up, the upper surround seam was was floated and dry brushed several times with the thinner mix until it was uniform and smooth. The final touch is done with straight glue for a good glossy shine cuz the small gaps are next to impossible to polish out.

On a side note, in most cases the roof that is removed often makes the best filler for a vert. Whether mounted convex up and flat blocked or inverted for the recessed look.

I always use Mr. Roboto, one of those cheapo rod and gator clip stands that can be articulated to keep both hands free and most importantly to help stuff flow or stay put depending on the angle used. In other words plan ahead and use angles and gravity to control the natural capillary action of the goo so it runs away from problem areas.

Looking forward to your next pic :thumbsup:

BH
 

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Discussion Starter #9
tossed the roof somewhere, and lost it... I planned on painting it from the start so no biggie. I need to start sanding it out, and a refill! Or 2,3,4, ....you get the idea. If you are painting it the stock styrene makes a good filler, easy to scrap the flat pieces with the exacto blade.
 

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I. M. Impressed

T-Jet Racer said:
did a quick wet sand w 400 then took pics
Looks great! It sits flat and appears to be a good fit side to side and a nice job on the rounded rear corners. I'd be happy with that. Your only gonna get better as you go and realize that there's no worries, cuz most any booboo can be fixed. I wish my first attempts came out that nice.

Do you have some jewelers or small files? They are very helpful for your precision fits.

Dont sweat the trunk lines. They'll clean right up.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
No, I don't have those type of files. Don't kid yourself, there is a lot of filler in that already. Here is the latest photo, I used a piece of box styrene to remake the body line I may need to do it to the bottom of the rear deck. We shall see after the next sanding!
 
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