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What's inconclusive, that it's rare? Meh, who cares, you found yourself a cool little stake bed, they always display well.
It is just a little beat up, hope you didn't pay too much.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
What's inconclusive, that it's rare? Meh, who cares, you found yourself a cool little stake bed, they always display well.
It is just a little beat up, hope you didn't pay too much.
24 New Zealand dollars, but I meant if it's actually blue or not. :) and it isn't just beat up, it looks like at some point a kid attempted to open the back up for extra fun and imagination but gave up half way.
 

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Ha! I would relish the opportunity, to interior design that is :dude:. But fishnet shirts? Girlfriend, that is so Birdcage. Sashay...Shantay! :lol:
 

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Judging by that last pic with the pic of the other two for comparison, I'd say that it's the very common, and inexpensive dark green staked one.
In fact, it's one of the most obtainable, cheapest old Lesneys in the 1-75 Series range, sometimes listed in books for as low as five or six dollars....in mint shape with the box! I think I have 3 or 4 of them myself. They seem to allways show up in lots, antique shops, and collections.

In the future, never over pay for a Lesney with any scratches unless it's rare, or extreemly disirable to your tastes.
Serious collectors usually consider even mildly scratched examples worthless, as most only collect minty mints.
That puts the value of scratched examples at 1 to 5 dollars if the seller is fair, but often most don't realize, or they ignore the fact that price guides are for dead-mint examples ONLY!

That doesn't mean that collecting scratched ones aren't fun to find. Much the opposite for me, I have many many imperfect Lesneys. I love them!!! But I NEVER pay more than a few dollars. Allways less than ten for something I can't live without, or a buck or two for a common one.
Don't give in to unfair pricing, as it just fuels the fire of these unsavory dealers, much like paying 30 or 100 dollars to HWs "Treasure" Hunt selling dueches. :)
The blue stakes are kinda rare, and worth more than double what the common version goes for. Oh well!
I've never even seen a blue one.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Judging by that last pic with the pic of the other two for comparison, I'd say that it's the very common, and inexpensive dark green staked one.
In fact, it's one of the most obtainable, cheapest old Lesneys in the 1-75 Series range, sometimes listed in books for as low as five or six dollars....in mint shape with the box! I think I have 3 or 4 of them myself. They seem to allways show up in lots, antique shops, and collections.

In the future, never over pay for a Lesney with any scratches unless it's rare, or extreemly disirable to your tastes.
Serious collectors usually consider even mildly scratched examples worthless, as most only collect minty mints.
That puts the value of scratched examples at 1 to 5 dollars if the seller is fair, but often most don't realize, or they ignore the fact that price guides are for dead-mint examples ONLY!

That doesn't mean that collecting scratched ones aren't fun to find. Much the opposite for me, I have many many imperfect Lesneys. I love them!!! But I NEVER pay more than a few dollars. Allways less than ten for something I can't live without, or a buck or two for a common one.
Don't give in to unfair pricing, as it just fuels the fire of these unsavory dealers, much like paying 30 or 100 dollars to HWs "Treasure" Hunt selling dueches. :)
The blue stakes are kinda rare, and worth more than double what the common version goes for. Oh well!
I've never even seen a blue one.
I don't collect minty mint. Quality only matters if you've already got one. I collect casings. Still, here is my question: do your very common green ones come up as blue in photos? Because this one sure does.

Two with flash




Two without flash




PS: as far as overpaying goes, they are not as common here in New Zealand as you might think, definitely not for 3-4 dollars in good condition with box. More like 20 dollars, and those prices are being paid. There aren't any swap meets or those kinds of things. Just about 4 million people in the whole country, not many of them are getting rid of their old Lesneys. It's a whole different way to collect, I'm afraid. Brand new die cast in 1/64 is about twice the price that you pay in the USA. Vintage is worse. However, of course you can always pay too much.

About 40 US dollars for the Cresta:



And even close to 135 US dollars for the Pontiac with common box:

 

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Discussion Starter #13
That's quite fair enough, but I still overpaid, didn't I. If a scratched green one is worth a dollar, apparently, I only should have paid two dollars. I find that side of collecting quite interesting because how often do we see collectors whinging about Hot Wheels mainlines costing more than 1.10 or .88, right? I don't want to stir the pot or argue, but the perception is clearly different in different parts of the world.
 

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If the market in NZ sees new Hot Wheels mainlines going for $5 USD, or whatever it is, and junked up Lesneys selling for $10 USD and up, then naturally you have to think of it differently. By the same token, books like the one Lummox mentioned probably don't reflect the NZ dollar. At 24 NZD, you probably overpaid according to real market value, even considering it's "rarity". But don't lose sleep over it, because it was worth it to you when you paid for it right?

One thing that gets my goat are the stupid prices that online dealers charge. You'd think being web based, they would have lower overhead and lower prices. But they're always more expensive than retail stores. Charging different prices for different cars from the same series, then jacking you on shipping charges. Pure silliness. That's why I don't buy anything unless it's on sale, and I can get it to my door, for the equivalent of what it would cost at a store. Keeping them in business with inflated prices is not my concern, keeping myself in business by limiting loss is. Even when it comes to old cars, patience really does pay off. You may think something is a once in a lifetime opportunity - and the seller wants you to think that, but in reality, not many things are. If you see something you like, don't hesitate to sleep on it. Even if you lose because you waited, we live in the age it the internet, another is bound to turn up.
 

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I think some of you might need to adjust your television sets, Kiwi's stake truck is clearly blue - cornflower blue :p.

This is blue...


And this is green...

But other pix of Kiwi's very same casting, it looks dark green.
It's purly the lighting/flash that's washing out the color, bringing out a blue hue.

Interesting thread you've started, Kiwi! :thumbsup:
 

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I don't collect minty mint. Quality only matters if you've already got one. I collect casings. Still, here is my question: do your very common green ones come up as blue in photos? Because this one sure does.

Two with flash




Two without flash




PS: as far as overpaying goes, they are not as common here in New Zealand as you might think, definitely not for 3-4 dollars in good condition with box. More like 20 dollars, and those prices are being paid. There aren't any swap meets or those kinds of things. Just about 4 million people in the whole country, not many of them are getting rid of their old Lesneys. It's a whole different way to collect, I'm afraid. Brand new die cast in 1/64 is about twice the price that you pay in the USA. Vintage is worse. However, of course you can always pay too much.
To answer your question, I've never taken a pic of my #4 with a flash, but maybe if I ever get new batteries for my camera, I'll give it a try and let you know!

As far as pricing goes, the thought didn't even cross my mind that the market might be completely different where you are, and sorry if I appeared insensative, or myopic. I'm just purly ill-informed!
I just really hate to see poeple over pay and taken advantage of. Thanks for setting me straight on your market, it definately puts things into perspective!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
To answer your question, I've never taken a pic of my #4 with a flash, but maybe if I ever get new batteries for my camera, I'll give it a try and let you know!

As far as pricing goes, the thought didn't even cross my mind that the market might be completely different where you are, and sorry if I appeared insensative, or myopic. I'm just purly ill-informed!
I just really hate to see poeple over pay and taken advantage of. Thanks for setting me straight on your market, it definately puts things into perspective!
That's fine. Things can come across differently on the internet sometimes. The point is that you're right, it does look a lot greener in real life and in some photos and that's what confused me as well as you. But the flash brings it out and I've never handled an actual green one to know the difference. I think I will settle for "I have a blue one but I've paid a little too much due to the market in New Zealand." :wave:
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Yes, well, I think so. Not to boast or anything, I do have cars that are more rare than this one, it's really not that. But this was a hard one to figure out. That alone makes me appreciate it more. I think there are more problems like this out there. You know how some cars look pink in photos when they're actually red. And then there is the Zodiac which is dark green in reality but a photo makes it look like a hard to find blue-ish teal.

http://www.vintagebritishdiecasts.co.uk/1index/xx33a.htm
 
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