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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What is teh best way to setup this car for a tight track carpet oval, very small oval. What tires, springs ride height, shock oil should i run on this car for 19t oval.

any sort of info is appreciated

Thanks erik
 

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I like Jaco purple/orange fronts, purple rear tires. -2.5 degrees camber on right side, +.5 degrees camber left side. White springs front, purple rear, 35-45 oils #2 pistons all around, batteries front. Check out the Leading Edge battery slider tray mod to move the batts farther left. Best $40 you can spend for an oval tourer. Camber links: right side, lower outside hole on shock tower, left side, upper inner hole on shock tower. Shock mounts on towers: inside hloes. No anti-roll bars. What's the minimum ride height at the track? That's your ride height. Get all the preload adjusters set for ride height, then crank a little more in the left rear shock preloader for the tweak adjustment. My car doesn't have droop screws. So I have infinite droop. Free up the drive train as much as possible. I just added ceramic bearings from RC4Less.com. That helped the drive train very well. What track will you race at?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
rockin_bob13 said:
I like Jaco purple/orange fronts, purple rear tires. -2.5 degrees camber on right side, +.5 degrees camber left side. White springs front, purple rear, 35-45 oils #2 pistons all around, batteries front. Check out the Leading Edge battery slider tray mod to move the batts farther left. Best $40 you can spend for an oval tourer. Camber links: right side, lower outside hole on shock tower, left side, upper inner hole on shock tower. Shock mounts on towers: inside hloes. No anti-roll bars. What's the minimum ride height at the track? That's your ride height. Get all the preload adjusters set for ride height, then crank a little more in the left rear shock preloader for the tweak adjustment. My car doesn't have droop screws. So I have infinite droop. Free up the drive train as much as possible. I just added ceramic bearings from RC4Less.com. That helped the drive train very well. What track will you race at?
thankfor the help i race at dirt runenrs inddor season and outdoor season
 

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Hope you don't mind if I hop on your thread. I picked up a used TC3 and plan on running it this winter. I will be running it on a flat carpet oval. The information in this thread should give me a good place to start. What are you guys running in the front, oneway or diff? I am guessing a one way is the way to go. Any other setup info would come in handy.
 

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When I put a one-way in there the car spins out when I blip the throttle in the turn. So I like it with the normal diff. I use the plastic outdrives to be lighter also. If you set the front diff tighter than the rear, it will push. If you set the rear diff tighter than the front, it will be loose.
 

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I race with Bob and used to beat him, but he has since surpassed my skills.

Having said that, a front one-way is probably not necessary on oval since we are always trying to take away as much steering as possible and still have the car turn. Having a front one-way may make it difficult to avoid traffic with only rear brakes. However, a better option may be center one-way instead. This would still give you the advantage of a front diff coming out of the corners but would also give you some extra steering off power. Just a thought.

As far as set-up goes, I've used a few different set-ups. However, what I've always come back to is starting with Purple/Orange (Plaid) front tires and purple rear. I think you can make any TC3 make it around the track using

that tire combo. Something I've been interested to try is the Pink/Orange tires for the rear or Double Pink to see if they will resist chunking. Speaking of tire wear, go with 26mm tires all around. I've used 24mm tires in the past and they had a tendency to chunk out so much rubber with a big hit that it ruined them.

As far as diffs go, I prefer the old steel diffs to the plastic diffs. I'm personally lazy when it comes to maintenance and I think that the steel diffs require less maintenance. Bob can verify how lazy I am. Speaking of diffs, resist the urge to replace the plastic with aluminum diffs. The aluminum outdrives will notch faster than either the plastic or steel. Plus buying a replacement set of plastic outdrives is only $5 retail. You may want to see how the plastic hold up in 19t, but again it is cheap enough to keep an extra set in the pit box.

As far as camber link locations, you can use the stock locations with limited success. However, you will get more tire wear and less performance. But if you switching between road course and oval with the car you may want to try the stock locations first.

As far as tire camber goes I start with 0' on the left front and -2 on the right front. In the rear I'd go with -1 on both rear tires check tire wear after a few runs. I agree that Bob's setup is a more ideal one for strictly oval, but I tend to like to have a multipurpose car.

As far as shocks and springs go, there are different ways to look at it. A lot of oval TC3 racers go with the stiffest possible setup they can get away with. This is usually running 80wt with #3 in front and white springs with 60+wt in the rear with #2 or #3 and purple or yellow springs. While running such a stiff setup does keep the car from rolling over in the corners it also makes the car very twitchy to drive. I've also seen guys who crank so much preload into the car that there is very little suspension travel. You can make a setup like this work, but I have come to the conclusion that the TC3 doesn't like to be sprung that way on oval. I would say that start with Bob's setup and go from there. However, I've seen a the stock 40wt #2 all around with gold springs in front and silver in the rear go around the track as well. However, that wouldn't be the fastest setup.

The best oval tip I have for a TC3 on carpet is to make sure your left rear suspension is long enough and moves freely enough. On oval pancar, it is harder to lift the left rear tire off the ground since it is a straight axle. However, since a touring car has independent suspension, I've had my TC3 spin out because I was lifting the left rear off the ground as the car turned into the corner. This can certainly be caused by to much weight transfer to the front, but it can also be caused by ill handling suspension in the rear.

Here are some basic suspension tips for the rear of a TC3.
- Make sure the a-arm moves freely. Completely remove the shock from the rear (left or right) and the tire. Make sure the a-arm moves up and down freely. The a-arm shouldn't bind. You should be able to push the a-arm up and it should be able to fall down under it's own weight. If not make sure it is not binding at the inner hinge pin or you may have a bent hinge pin.
- Make sure the hub carrier moves freely. Sometimes you may have to lightly sand the hub carrier or spacers to prevent binding. Be careful not to remove too much material or you will have slop.
- Make sure the rear shock isn't binding when mounted to the tower and rear a-arm. Sometimes the angle of the shock on the rear arms causes it bind. This prevents the shock from traveling down freely. To check this, mount the rear shock without a spring to the tower and a-arm and see if it moves freely down. You may want to put the tire on when doing this. If the a-arm was free before mounting the shock and now sticks with the shock the you may have a bind. You may need to add shims behind the shock bushing to achieve a more optimal angle for the shock. Add the spring and recheck for binds.
- Make sure your rear shock length is equal or for oval you can make the left rear shock length a little longer. If the left rear shock length is shorter than it may cause the left tire to lift during weight transfer.
- Make sure the droop of the rear a-arm is equal or for oval make sure the left is equal or lower than the right. Improper droop screw settings can prevent the left rear a-arm from having enough down travel and can make the car loose.

Obviously you want all the shocks to be working properly, but you really want to make sure the left rear is working on a TC3 on oval.

There are more tips, but I'll post them in another message.
 

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Some other tips for the TC3

- Check diffs to make sure they are working. A loose front diff will make the car oversteer or loose and an overly tight front diff will make it understeer or push. Loose front and rear diff will make cause sluggish acceleration. Make sure both diffs are working properly.
- Periodically check the CVDs for binding or damage. This is more critical for the front where the CVD is partially hidden. The CVD pin likes to work loose. Make sure you loctite the set screw. While checking the CVDs, make sure you don't have a worn or broken bearing.
- Don't overtighten the wheel nuts. This causes binding on the drive train. If you have an old kit or used kit, make sure you are using the bearing spacers. Buy low profile wheel nuts or loctite the nut with blue loctite.
- Use 1/2" screws on the diff cases if the hole is stripped.
- Carefully mount the body and check to make sure it isn't rubbing the wheels or carpet. The body mounts on a TC3 aren't the greatest and the body can float around a little. If you notice where a wheel is rubbing, trim the body. This may seem obvious, but I've seen racers with slammed bodies spinning out because a wheel was rubbing during suspension travel. This can happen during up-travel as well. Also, if the body is rubbing the carpet it is only slowing you down.
- Check tire wear periodically. The tire wear will show you if a corner needs more or less camber. It will also tell you how the car is peforming. If you are getting even tire wear, then your setup is close. If you notice one of your tires have a glazed effect, then you might be lifting that tire and losing traction.
- Buy or make a larger front bumper and nerf bars. BRP makes an add-on front bumper and nerf bars, but you can easily make your own out of ABS plastic.
 
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