Hobbyist Forums banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey Guys,

If there is one common thought throughout this forum is that the front end of an oval pan car is where the real speed is at. I have read much of the info on this site about caster, camber, camber gain, toe in, toe out, toe correction, roll center etc etc etc. I must say it is all very confusing. That being said here is my question:

Is there any way to "bench test" a front end? IE with the body off of course, turn the wheels to the point you feel represents their position in the center of the turn, compress the chassis with a weight and look for what happens. Will this work-help? If so what specifically should I be looking for? Thanks for any help.

AT
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,766 Posts
Main thing you can do is get the car ready to run, and look for preload or sag in the front end. I like to have the RF with no preload but no sag. I like to have between .020 and .040 sag in the LF. Also, check your bumpsteer (for those that dont know, keeping the wheels in the same position through suspension compression is having no bumpsteer and thats what i like).

With that said, most of the adjustments i do to my car on race day is in tires, and the front end. Once the rear is set i usually dont change it much. I always start with the same weight on the LR tire.

Now, these are my opinions and what works for me, so your car/driving style may not be the same.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Main thing you can do is get the car ready to run, and look for preload or sag in the front end. I like to have the RF with no preload but no sag. I like to have between .020 and .040 sag in the LF. Also, check your bumpsteer (for those that dont know, keeping the wheels in the same position through suspension compression is having no bumpsteer and thats what i like).

With that said, most of the adjustments i do to my car on race day is in tires, and the front end. Once the rear is set i usually dont change it much. I always start with the same weight on the LR tire.

Now, these are my opinions and what works for me, so your car/driving style may not be the same.
Thanks Chris.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,648 Posts
You are right, in the pits, we can check caster, camber, camber gain, toe, ackerman, bumpsteer, roll center, and spring preload. But it's only part of the picture because you can't see flex, weight transfer, traction, tire sidewalls, vibration, etc.. in the pits.

For what we can check, my favorite setup tool is the Unity Tool Tweak Board.


It's so good, you can see toe within a fraction of a degree. At my local track and other race events, I rarely see people with these, so I usually let people use it. Maybe it's the steep price, I don't know. I like to give credit where credit is due. I've found nothing that check's for toe, camber, and ackerman better than this. It's also extremely useful for setting up the radio trim too. For example, if I run a half degree of rear steer, I can trim my radio so the wheels are turned a half a degree to the right. I set the car down on the track and I'm usually dead on, or 1 click away from the trim I want.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,412 Posts
You are right, in the pits, we can check caster, camber, camber gain, toe, ackerman, bumpsteer, roll center, and spring preload. But it's only part of the picture because you can't see flex, weight transfer, traction, tire sidewalls, vibration, etc.. in the pits.

For what we can check, my favorite setup tool is the Unity Tool Tweak Board.


It's so good, you can see toe within a fraction of a degree. At my local track and other race events, I rarely see people with these, so I usually let people use it. Maybe it's the steep price, I don't know. I like to give credit where credit is due. I've found nothing that check's for toe, camber, and ackerman better than this. It's also extremely useful for setting up the radio trim too. For example, if I run a half degree of rear steer, I can trim my radio so the wheels are turned a half a degree to the right. I set the car down on the track and I'm usually dead on, or 1 click away from the trim I want.
you can if you have the right software, LOL
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top