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This is one of those AW Vettes that comes in their kit. It got 2 coats of silver and 7 coats of Transparent Candy Emerald Green and then a coat of Future. It seems no mattter what brand I use, the rattle cans always come out speckly. I make sure they're not cold and shake them quite a bit before spraying. I give long sweeps of the spray past what I'm spraying (as per instructions) and I still don't get that smooth look. What am I doing wrong?
hojoe
 

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LED Burner Outer
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Just out of curiosity, what brand and type of paint are you using?? I bought enough Duplicolor and plasticoat paint I should buy stock in the companies! :lol: The only thing I can think of other than type of paint (I avoid enamels now) maybe it's how thick the coats you're putting on, how old the paint is, or surface prep. Also, if the primer or base coat comes out on the lumpy side, it will carry on through all the coats of paint afterwards. A wet sanding may be all it needs to smooth out, or a bunch more future.. :rolleyes: I wish I had the simple answer for you. Maybe one of the paint gurus will kick in an answer, but I think the "what kind of paint" contains a clue and be required for a good answer..
 

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I used Testors spray enamel that I bought last week at the hobby shop. The silver prime coat (which was Plasti-Kote) looked smooth enough. I waste more paint then I get on the car with the wide sweeps I make when spraying.
hojoe
 

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I won't say switching to lacquer based paints will solve your all of dilemma, but it'll be a start. The biggest problem will be color selection, and lately, the auto parts stores have really cut back on the assortment of spray bombs. As I said, I quit using enamels for a few reasons. Enamel never really seems to cure all the way. It may be dry enough to touch without paint transfer to your fingers, but it will stay soft enough to show a fingernail mark in it if you dig it lightly. The last one I painted stayed "tacky" for over 3 weeks, and became a dirt magnet. Lacquer dries really fast, dries hard, and usually has a nice finish before the clear goes on. Just for an experiment, next time try using all lacquer for the whole project and see if there's an improvement.

If you want some really sweet lacquer paints, I recommend the metalcast colors. They can be sprayed over any duplicolor silver or gold flake metallic paint, and they are a candy type paint. The more coats you apply, the darker the color. Up until a month ago, the chain auto parts stores had a rainbow of colors. The local shops have cut back to stocking red, blue and purple now. I have green and orange in these paints and the effects are stunning, especially in the sunlight! They cost a little more than a small can of testors, but these are big cans and can paint a bunch of cars..
 

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Yeah, the car does look good.

After my experiment with enamels I stay away from them too.
 

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Love the Vette and hubs!!!!

... but hate most Testor's paints... metallic or otherwise. My apologies to it's many fans, but I have only found a couple cans in years that didn't have a problem of some kind. The brand might be the cause or the age of what you have like FCB says. Problem is the distributor could have purchased it years ago in bulk to get a lower cost. They ship it to the shop and who knows how much is purchased and for how long it sits there. I'm not convinced it keeps forever.

I have found Tamiya to be the most reliable for me and am starting to dabble with Duplicolor. I have another thought about a possible cause though. Brand aside, I have had a similar thing happen when I was spraying too far away from the piece. It almost looked like some particles were drying before hitting the target and just laying there on the surface. Not spattering, but just not mixing right in the spray itself or as it hit the piece.

I would try using the very same can on a beater bod and get closer to it. See if the surface comes out smoother. A light coat is a light coat too. You can always lay more on... can't take it away though. nd
 

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Let the Phsssssssssssssssssssssht-ing begin....

... but hate most Testor's paints... metallic or otherwise. My apologies to it's many fans, but I have only found a couple cans in years that didn't have a problem of some kind. The brand might be the cause or the age of what you have like FCB says. Problem is the distributor could have purchased it years ago in bulk to get a lower cost. They ship it to the shop and who knows how much is purchased and for how long it sits there. I'm not convinced it keeps forever.

I have found Tamiya to be the most reliable for me and am starting to dabble with Duplicolor. I have another thought about a possible cause though. Brand aside, I have had a similar thing happen when I was spraying too far away from the piece. It almost looked like some particles were drying before hitting the target and just laying there on the surface. Not spattering, but just not mixing right in the spray itself or as it hit the piece.

I would try using the very same can on a beater bod and get closer to it. See if the surface comes out smoother. A light coat is a light coat too. You can always lay more on... can't take it away though. nd
Nuther Dave may have hit the nail right on the head here with the paint drying before it hits your slot body. Paint dries in the air so getting closser certainly will help out. With my airbrush I get close but, can put on less paint while doing that also. With less air presure you have less chance of getting runs also which is why I just started painting with an Airbrush at the age of 12 ( a long, long time ago...DO IT! )

I did up a dune buggy in some orange paint with a spray can and it turned out fine. I got pretty close to the body when Phsssssssssssssssshting. If it looks a little heavy just leave it be and walk away. As the paint dries it will shrink down and everything will be fine....well that is if you don't have drips and stuff...then Plop it and try again.

Here is a good thing to try also. Lets say you have a bunch of AW Dune buggies ( :):):):) ). Just get a few mounted up and start spraying. Pick the best and Plop the rest. Heck you might end up with 2 good ones and then you can set one aside to dry for a while and do a Hilltop 2 tone mask job!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :woohoo: !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Bob...Nice looking Vette...zilla
 

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Model Murdering
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Nice car!!!

As for painting; you should be able to attain acceptable results using EITHER enamel or lacquer.

"Texturing" or pebbling, as you have described, is a dry condition. It occurs for a number of reasons. The most obvious reason is an internally fubarred can; and then of course a crappy nozzle that atomizes like a garden sprinkler. Internally fubarred cans have often sat in warehouses or stowage well past their born on date. Crappy nozzles should be discarded....good ones should be cleaned, saved and cherished. Regardless these are manufacturing or pre end user faults.

If your experiencing pebbling with a good can, your travel speed might be a little fast, your distance may be pulled back too far; or both! While caution is a good thing "overly cautious" has it's draw backs and markers as well. Too high a travel speed doesnt allow for proper film build and the exposed droplet edges set up before you pass by again. Applying from to far away (excessive hang time) allows the atomized micro droplets to begin curing into stickey "bloblets" that pile up rather than comingling in a uniform film.

Laying a good film takes practice and a touch of kamakazee. At some point ya just gotta get right up on it and pull the trigger. This is why you hear everyone who paints insisting on test shots. It's where you get the feel for travel speed, and distance; AND what type of film build and coverage to expect at that given speed and distance.

The whole lacquer or enamel question is a moot point in my book. Lacquer is quick drying and stretches out tight over details... AS WILL ANY FAST DRYING ENAMEL ....read the label!!!!!. If ya cant handle it carefully in an hour or three DONT expect any miracle paint jobs. Sticky but handleable, still printing (as in fingers) and fully cured are the only things ya really care about.

Naturally all bets are off if your primer went down dry and "gnarbly". If you didnt correct it, your top coat will reflect the exact texture beneath it. Wet sanding is a must when your primer goes down rough.

If there is a trick, I would have to say that it's about realizing that in order to get a good job you have to walk right up to the edge of running it (the paint) and take one step back. Recognizing that point is an acquired feel that ya get with repetition and trips to the ....gulp ....pinesol jar. Everyone has favorites or recommendations...all that matters are the results....fast, tight, and clean...I dont care who the heck makes it! There's all kinds of paints out there that dont meet that minimum requirement. IMHO it is the result of regulatory agencies taking the skull and crossbones out of the product and inserting salad dressing.
 

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Bill I gotta hand it to ya, that was one hell of a dissertation on paint bombs, speed and travel time. HHHHHOOOORAAHHH!!!!! :)
 

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I like Testor's paint, but the nozzles are inconsistent. When I find a good one, I save it and use it again. Same with Tamia paints.

I think the Vette looks nice!

Next time, try using a Testors clear coat instead of Future. It helps level off alot of "speck" issues. It seems to soften up the paint underneath and smooths it out as it dries.

also, what Bill said!
 

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Maybe we need " born-on dates" Like the beer companies use. UMMMM beer. But I do agree with VJ I try to save good spraying tips for future use cuz i hate stripping a body when i'm in the mood to paint. And I really like the new Testors Laquer they have come out with. But you need a totally clean canvas before trying to spray or you get dimples.
Clyde-0-Mite
 

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If things go real bad Plop it goes but......

Next time, try using a Testors clear coat instead of Future. It helps level off alot of "speck" issues. It seems to soften up the paint underneath and smooths it out as it dries.
Yep that makes sense....nice call VJ on the clear coat softening technique! :thumbsup:

Also if you are using an airbrush and you get the speckles. Try loading up a little paint thinner only. A quick pass with thinner only may also smooth things out. It has worked for me & has also made me Plop too. You will need to wait a bit to let things dry again. Then give it a nice final coat.

I use Future for most of my clearcoats but, also have Testors clear coat to run in my airbrush. Will keep this in mind for the next 911 paint job gone bad episode.

Bob...The Pine Sol jar is not always the answer...zilla
 
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