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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
There's a first time for everything, and now's the first time I'm (about to) use lichen on the base of a figure kit. What do I use to attach it?
AND, after the lichen is secured into place (and the "adhesive" is dry) can I (should I) seal it with Testor's Dull Cote?
Thanks!
Phil K
 

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When I attach things like brush and greenery to my plastic models I used a thick white craft glue. I picked it up at Michael's and it is rather like the classic Elmer's Glue but is thicker. Like Elmer's it dries clear as well so isn't noticeable once dry.
 

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I have not tried spraying any with dull cot before. What I do is get a small spray bottle and fill it with diluted Elmers glue. About the consistancy of milk, I then spritz this all over the grass, twigs, leaves, etc. This will then hold verything in place.
 

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rhino',

I think Bob was referring to Aleene's Tacky Glue, which is thicker than Elmer's as stated. I'm not convinced that it holds groundwork so very much better than Elmer's, but either product will do the job. Robiwon's suggestion is a good one, except I haven't found a sprayer that relases the thinned glue in a uniform mist; it always just squirts out in a stream for me. I generally just pat a brush wetted with the glue/water mix onto the groundwork. The material can be poked around for a convincingly random effect.

One thing I'd like to suggest is, any groundwork that's added to a model looks more realistic if it's painted to a greater or lesser extent. I've judged many dioramas at IPMS shows in which the subject model, figures, surrounding structures, and base were all painted - but the groundwork was added in its normal coloring (usually armor dios, for some reason). There's a marked contrast between painted elements and those that are naturally colored and that contrast reduces the integration of the overall scene.

This doesn't mean that every bit of groundwork has to be covered like the parts of a model. I've found that a dark wash helps add depth to plants and a little drybrushing here and there breaks up the monotony of the packaged color without the entire piece being thoroughly coated with paint. A little observation of real plants shows that they have many colors, with younger leaves looking brighter than the main plant, and yellow or brown dead leaves showing in places. These little touches can make your groundwork look as convincing as the model you place it around.
 

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If you use white glue be aware that when it dries it can leave somewhat of a gloss-semigloss sheen. Just make sure that it will be covered by the foliage.
 
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