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Discussion Starter #1
(1977) Paramount announces a fourth television network. Its flagship series is Star Trek Phase II. The as yet unwritten pilot is scheduled to air in February 1978. Walter Jefferies later designs a refitted Enterprise, and Brick Price is contracted to build the filming miniature. [Source: Star Trek Phase II: The Lost Series (Judith and Garfield Reeves-Stevens, Pocket Books, 1997)]

Just wondered if there were any picture links to this ship.
 

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I'm afraid the Phase II book is your best reference to that Enterprise. Brick Price had (not sure if he still does) a picture on his site which he claims is of the filming model. Frankly, it looks more to me like a kitbashed TMP Enterprise, but I admit that just may be my perception.

Maybe Cory McDaniel will decide to do the Phase II ship as part of his line sometime in the future.

-The Rat
 

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Mike,

These pictures look very much like the TMP model prior to it's refit for the theatrical movie. (hence the updated ID penents and Photon Torpedo design. Nearly the same as in TMP)

I remember seeing an article where the model was striped and detailed to a far greater scale for the big screen.

I think the Art of Star Trek might show the model in that condidtion as built by Abel and Associates.

John Nelson
Glendale, AZ
 

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The model pictured IS the Phase II ship...or what is left of it. Brick Price decided years later to modify the original Phase II model to more closely resemble the Motion Picture Enterprise model as built by Magicam.

Personally, I wish he had left it in the original design condition of the Phase II TV series design. The only major design influences that remain from the TV version are the details on the warp engine nacelle near the front on the left and right sides.

Pity.
 

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Hello fellow modellers.

John, I agree with Trek Ace on this one. The series II was ready to go until they(the Big cheese at Paramount) decided to turn it into a motion picture. All the models(including the Klingon cruiser) were heavely modified for movie screen.

Is there anybody on this board that has a copy of the Cinefex issue that talks about the special effects of STTMP? Maybe there's mention of the models used on phase II before they got upgraded it.

Do we consider the phase II E. canon? It maybe an interesting subject for a scratchbuilt. :D

Mike :wave:
 

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IDIC has these pics of the P2E, although even this one I think has been tweaked a bit to look more like the TMP version.

Also, the P2E and the actual TMP FX model are two different models. The P2E was about 6 feet, the TMP is a little over 8 feet.
 

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P2E under construction
 

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Gee, I'm surprised that Ziz hadn't mentioned my long running saga with trying to do a Phase 2 Enterprise kitbash. Maybe he's trying to not mention it in the hopes he will get his Ultimate Bridge done first (yet he already has a strong lead). ;)

Anyway, I've researched that beast quite a bit and the Phase 2 book from Pocket Books is your best reference for that ship. Most everything else I've found just supliments the images found in that book. The "Art of Star Trek" book also contains an additional painting of the P2E, and this was used as a basis for the Enterprise on the cover.

It looks like the line drawings in the book are as accurate as you can get, considering they look almost identical to the Enterprise bridge graphics seen in TMP, Trek 2 and Trek 3 (the destruct sequence image with the countdown number on it). Watch Okuda's text commentary on the DVD of Trek 2 as he calls out the graphic from the weapons console during shield activation. Except for a couple details on the pylons, this graphic is identical to what is in the book.

Near as I can tell, the Phase 2 Enterprise model was never 100% finished in its Phase 2 guise. Star Trek Phase 2 was actually cancelled early in its conception, but Paramount continued with development of the sets, models and stories as they didn't want to tip their hand that they were going to go with a motion picture and there was still a possiblity that a TV show might be planned for after the movie at that point. So, the model didn't really have a chance to be finished.

Brick Price apparently had inherited the molds for that ship, but I haven't been able to get an email response from him on the Phase 2 ship during the several inquiries I made. Other sources (such as Rick Sternbach) say that the ship was actually built by Don Loos, so it depends on who you talk to as far as who the builder (or builders) was.

The details on the TMP like ship that Brick did indicate that it definately has Phase 2 origins. The warp engines are the dead giveaway and the TOS like shuttlebay is another clue. It makes no sense that this model would have been built with these key Phase 2 features if it wasn't indeed the Phase 2 miniature or casted from the original molds and modified. The Phase 2 model itself was never shot for TMP, but it is possible that certain elements of the TMP design might have been tried out on this model as it was almost completed and available as a study model. But this is just speculation on my part.

As for my continuing mission (a 5 year mission extended to 10 years at this rate) to do a Phase 2 model, I am using a movie Enterprise kit as the basis and some minor details are being donated by a Cutaway TOS E and some resin bits provided by DLM and Andy a.k.a. Stars for the impulse engine and the bridge dome (which is a Soyuz bridge, modified slightly). I have all the parts I need and I pull the model out once in awhile, work on it and then put it away when the project gets tiresome. Then a few months later I start the saga over again. I did mods to the saucer and the secondary hull, but I'm going to transfer the mods to a new model as I managed to acquire a built smoothie for dirt cheap (still not quite as cheap as Ziz's though) during the summer months and will work on that instead. This way, I can do the mods a little better and I won't have to worry about filling that really awful tile pattern. About the only assemblies that still need work from scratch are the saucer pylon and the warp engine pylons. Decals won't be a problem as I have the ALPS printer for that. And before anyone asks, no I don't have any plans to finish this model as a master for a resin kit. I might provide a couple bits that I had to resin cast to somebody for use as a basis for resin parts. But this model will be an only one.

Maybe I'll get the courage up to finish it for Wonderfest this year, but I've said that before and still have not met that goal. But keep asking me from time to time and maybe I'll get closer to finishing it.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
ThanX everyone for all the links and info on this ship.

The reason why I was interested in this project to begin with is that I have had that same comic book advertisement for ST:TMP in my special ST picture file collection for many years now. This is the same ship that appears on the "Blooper" advertisement on one of the web pages. The only difference is that the comic poster was in colour.

I scanned it into the computer when I first bought a scanner, but because that comic was very old and very dammaged, (Actually all that was left was the front and back cover, totally crinkled too.) I spent the whole afternoon remastering the photo itself as well as removing the ship from the black space background and actor's photos and placing it into a blue nebula scene. With these other photos I downloaded, I might make a collage showing the completed photo in the middle with the unfinished model pics surrounding it, just for reference. I might even place it on the net too, if anyone is interested.

ThanX to everyone's help, I am able to see other angles, such as the top and warp engines. This is vital information and I reason that with some scratchbuilding, I could create some motors and struts to hold them on. I was also thinking of using the AMT old 18" Enterprise kit (6676) as a basis, even though the PII saucer looks considerably bigger. I am going to try and keep everything in proportion to make it look balanced.

I also reasoned that there are 2 Phase II Enterprises, both of which were never shown. The first is the one in the comic poster, and the second is the one that resembles the TMP one with "Wacky" motors. I think you know what I mean, right?
 

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Well, the one on the teaser poster was drawn by a movie poster artist and isn't based on a model at all. If you look close at it, it has features that appear to have been introduced in the Phase 2 artworks and were planned for the studio model. But, the artist used it as a basis for this different design (with altered elements of the Phase 2 ship) which is only intended to draw a viewer's attention and not show anything from the film itself.
 

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There were several renditions of the Enterprise in her journey from Original Series to Phase II, and finally to TMP release version.

The original plan was to have the exterior stay the same familiar Enterprise design from the original series, albeit with a remodeled interior. There are artist conceptions depicting this.

Soon after, it was decided to remodel the exterior as well, resulting in nearly a dozen slightly different designs by artists Matt Jefferies, Mike Minor, Joe Jennings, Richard Taylor and, of course, Andy Probert. There was also a radical concept provided by Ralph McQuarrie, that retained the saucer and engine pods, but dispensed with the cigar-shaped secondary hull and replaced it with a triangular wedge-shaped version with a large, wide shuttlecraft hangar in the rear (I think someone mentioned that one earlier).

The first versions retained most of the features of the original TV version, with most changes being with the engine nacelles and struts, going from a cylindrical shape to the more aquamechanimorphic design as seen in the motion picture. The sensor dish and spike on the secondary hull were present through many of the first concepts, giving way to the recessed, glowing, spike-less dish of later versions.

Other features that were more hard-edged and squarish on the original ship were eventually rounded and made more streamlined. The Phase II model was slightly past the "half-way" point in it's depiction of what would become the final design. Even the 100-inch movie model, built by Magicam, went through several cosmetic changes before arriving at the final, Doug Trumbull-influenced self-illuminating version in it's final form.

ACE
 

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What is your source for all this information you're always stating, "Trek Ace"? I'm curious to know as you often talk about stuff yet rarely give a reference.

-------------

Jeffrey Griffin
Griffworks Shipyards
Last Updated 16 November, 2002!
 

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I've always believed that the PII is the refit filming miniature - or at least some of it.

There are lines that appear on the refit in it's TMP paint scheme that would look like panel lines, unless you're looking for seam lines where the parts have been extened or altered.

The joining part bettween the secondary and primary hulls is the same length of the PII up to the seperation lines at the top. There's also a diagonal(sp?) line that goes down the rear of that section that I think is the seam line where the section was extended. IMO, the torpedo side sections look like a slightly different shade compared to the rest, as though they have been added later.

The section of the hull near the shuttle bay has marks - that look like seam filling at the exact point where the PII would have been extended.

Also, ILM always complained that it was a monster of a miniature that took 7 people to lift, in my limited TV verses movie miniature construction experience, TV miniatures always seem to be built to bulky standards and the images in the PII book of the ship under construction seem to fit that bill.

I do have pictures to back up my claims, I just need to dig them out.

Anyway, just MHO.

Mike
 

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>aquamechanimorphic

I now live with the hope that, one day before I depart this life, I'll have a reason to use this word. ;)

Qapla'

SSB

"You are wrong, Zord! Your ray is no match for Lord Gorlock!"
 

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The Phase II model and the TMP model are not one and the same. The PII model was built for the demands of the TV screen and used construction and detailing techniques to meet the requirements of that medium. Details that appear acceptable on a 20" TV screen are woefully inadequate when projected on a 40' movie screen. The PII model was too small and lacked the required detail for the extreme demands of motion picture photography.

A new, larger model was then commissioned, this time built by Magicam, supervised by Jim Dow. Many of the same design elements of the PII were retained, but they were refined and brought up in detail. This model was built with a heavier armature and weighed a lot more than it's PII predecessor, coming in at 85 pounds. As an example of how tough this model is built, the metal engine struts themselves are half-inch thick aluminum plate! The skin is plastic, the pylon shells being styrene backed with foam. The secondary hull is made of transparent butyrate and the saucer from 1/8-inch ABS. There was no fiberglass used in the construction of the movie model as there was in the PII ship. I know of ILM's complaint about the weight of the model, but it was built to last indefinitely, not just for one film. (Note: The original series model came in at 250 pounds, which makes the movie model is only 1/3 the weight of the original}.

The metal armature itself had to be designed and built to extremely high tolerences, allowing for absolute-zero repositioning in the event that if it needed to be reshot, it could be repositioned on the mount and shot in exactly the same position as before. The model itself had to move, so there could not be any chance it would ever quiver, wobble, etc., while moving or this would destroy the illusion of a large, thousand foot vessel easing out of drydock. It also had to be able to keep it's shape and never sag or bend, allowing it's participation in any future sequels down the road.

The model could be supported in five different locations:

1) Bottom of secondary hull.
2) Left side of secondary hull.
3) Right side of secondary hull.
4) Front of secondary hull, behind removable deflector dish.
5) Aft through the hangar bay doors.

Now, with all this, Doug Trumbull (who took over visual effects production from Robert Abel & Associates) complained that the movie model itself was too small, that it was only one-fourth the size that he felt was necessary to convey such an immense vessel believably on screen. But, with only eight months left to finish the required visual effects in time for release, building an even larger model was out of the question, so the existing model was rewired and (along with the Klingon ship model) superdetailed into the existing rendition of the model that we all know and love.

Using scale lighting techniques and reproducing certain areas of the ship exterior in larger scales, the effect of a large ship was pulled off and appeared quite convincing.

ACE
 
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