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Hello all,

I've come across several JADA models that are some of the best castings of their respective models except they are low riders. I've tried using (or enlarging) the existing axle housing and attaching larger wheels but the models still sit noticeably lower than a stock version. I could glue a new axle underneath but the kid in me still prefers to keep the free wheeling motion. Does anyone have suggestions for lifting these closer to stock height without compromising the rolling wheels?

Thanks!
 

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Hello all,

I've come across several JADA models that are some of the best castings of their respective models except they are low riders. I've tried using (or enlarging) the existing axle housing and attaching larger wheels but the models still sit noticeably lower than a stock version. I could glue a new axle underneath but the kid in me still prefers to keep the free wheeling motion. Does anyone have suggestions for lifting these closer to stock height without compromising the rolling wheels?

Thanks!
No prollem!
Take your trusty Dremell and cut a groove in the bottom side of the base for both axles.
But with Jada style wheels I believe you'll need some sort of tubing to put the axles in so it'll roll freely.
After you dig them out of their origonal locations use JB Weld or something similar...hot glue gun even, to secure the tubing into place.
Of course you will have to remove the wheels from the origonal axles.
Gradually cut into the bottom side and test fit a little at a time untill you've reached your desired ride hieght.

Hope this works, and be sure to show us some purdy pix!

Did this to a JL '64ish Chevy truck and it came out awesome, only I just remembered I did it an even simpler way.
Hopefully I can convey the method without pix.
Instead of taking the wheels off from the axles, I left them together and then cut the grooves for the axles deep enough so that there was enough surrounding material (metal) to hammer or pinch with pliers, over the axles so that they would stay in the grooves. The axles still spin in the grooves. It worked sweet, and no tubing needed!
Lemme know if you need a better discription.




LMX :wave:
 

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With this one it was simple. I used a small piece of balsa wood and glued it to the outside of the base of the truck. Then I glued the new axles to the balsa wood. Simple and effective. Just have to be careful with the glue so it does not seep over into the wheels.

 
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