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Hi,You know I see these other people go to all out extents on making kits perfectly accurate.That's fine for some people but guess what, if it looks reasonably accurate then that's good enough for me.Trying to build a studio quality model can be quite a workload and sometimes I want to have just some good old fashion fun.Do a reasonable build job in a reasonable amount of time.Model building is up to the indivual builder and if you don't want to do an extensive job,you shouldn't have to.You only have to please yourself,not build your kits to professional standards.It's nice to do that but for a person who can't paint well,it takes away from the enjoyment of building a model,Guy Schlicter.
 

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Thanks, Guy! One thing that I have found with this board is that most of the really great modelers on here are also very nice people who give lots of encouragement to people who don't have their tools, talent, and time. They give generously of their helpful hints. I know that none of my builds will approach theirs in terms of "studio quality" appearance, but they give me lots of good ideas to emulate. I build better models because of this board.

The patience factor seems to be the big differentiator here. With sufficient time, you or I could build something almost as good as what the skilled builders do...problem is TIME!! I can instantly tell when I do something because I got impatient - the result is inevitably less than what I am happy with, because I know I can do better. If I had taken even 15 minutes longer on some things, I would have been happier with the end result.

Looking back through the thread on my Enterprise refit, I realize that it was nearly 3 months since I first started building. And that doesn't count the 2+ months between when I bought the kit and then started - time I spent looking through all these threads getting ideas for how to start the kit -- and getting thoroughly intimidated by the amazing work out there!! I'm almost done with the basic wiring and assembly, but I probably have another month of filling and sanding before I can even start painting, which is probably another several months of work. I see a lot of posts from people who say that they're afraid to start because they see how much work is involved once they get into it.

I suggest having the end result clearly in mind before you start. Is this a kit you want to display to your friends and family? Is this a chance for you to try some new technique, like lighting or airbrushing? (a techniuqe that you can apply to a "display" build later?) Is is something you're building just for the heck of it? You can have several builds, with several desired end results, going on at the same time. For example, once I start painting my Enterprise, I will probably make several smaller-scale kits for fun, to have something fun to do as each coat of paint dries.

I want to do a really good job on the E, so I'm going to take my time with it. I don't know if I would have purchased it if I knew it would take a year to build it, but this is one that I want to be my showpiece. At this point, I have invested a lot of money and time into it and I don't want to throw it away on something that's less than the best I can do! (I need to remind myself about what I learned in school about "sunk costs" - but nevermind!)

Not every build has to be a masterpiece. However, you can also just do it for fun and yet be fully present "in the moment" with every seam you glue. Take the judgment out of what you're doing, don't worry about how long it's taking, and just be attentive to what you're doing NOW. It becomes a meditative exercise. That's the real fun to me, just losing myself in what I'm doing at the moment and letting go of the rest of my day.
 

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Part of the Patience Factor for me, personally, is taking the time to learn thru others efforts. I quite often will read thru the threads, see how someone else built a model or fixed a problem and make notes. That and, where ever economically feasible, I'll usually buy two of that model and do a "quick-n-dirty" build on one while taking some notes on problem areas, then build the second using those lessons learned.
 

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Griffworks said:
I'll usually buy two of that model and do a "quick-n-dirty" build on one while taking some notes on problem areas, then build the second using those lessons learned.
Sometimes the easy solutions like this just escapes me. This way the instant craving for new toys is filled, and at the same time I wouldn't have to scrounge e bay when I finally want to do it right.

My way is to buy the model, build it only to see what others have done and place it in the garage. Then 10 years later try it again. I also have a few that after seeing all of stuff here and on other boards are palced in a closet till I feel I can do them justice.

Some things like the studio scale stuff I do take on the feel of a long term job, while I have been known to buy a model at lunch and have it made in 15 minutes.

I guess for me it really just boils down to the fun level. I'll spend the time to do it right, and in some instances I'll spend the time to go for the "WOW" factor
 

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Some folks enjoy just the assembly of a model, and put the decals on bare plastic. I Like to make my subjects look like the SPFX model if possible. My figures-as limited as they are- are done to look alive. For me the challenge is doing everything from cleaning parts, assembly, additional extras like mechanical stuff, and the final finish, all without hosing up the model so it's trash. Th pride comes with the completion, and for involved projects, when I hit a milestone (working gear on a LM 2 foot jupiter 2 while the rest isn't finished yet) . The fun is showing off to others so someone will eventually top my efforts.
 

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Yes, I definitely agree with celebrating milestones on long term projects. I'm eagerly awaiting turning on all the lights in my Enterprise at one time! That'll be my reward for my patience to date. And then I mask over the lights to start painting...
 

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Recently, on a model where construction order is not critical, I've been building so as to give the most finished appearance, at each step. This was motivated by wanting to show it to someone, even though incomplete. I must say, I like the additional sense of accomplishment I get from this approach.
 

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For me, the boards I frequent, and this new board (to me) will be invaluable tools. I have learned an incredible amount of things to get a model to look more like what I wanted. To me, agonizing over every little detail takes the fun out of it. There is nothing wrong with anyone who does take the time to make it as close to or even and exact match of the studio shooting mini. That would be the ultimate goal.
When and if I ever find the time to start my 350 PL E, I want it to be perfect. Until I get my skill set to the level it needs to be, to do that kit justice, I'll enjoy building "accurate" for me kits.

That's the bottom line, I think, you have to be happy with what you've accomplished. Right?

Cheers

j
 

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You got to be happy with what you build, or what is the point of building models. Sure I like to show my models to everyone, but if nobody likes it, I will not throw it away. If I am happy, that is all that counts. I hope that others like my model, and that is a big plus to me, but I do it for me.
 
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