Hobbyist Forums banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
920 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The only Alvis in my collection - the 1:1 dates from 1962. The body was styled by Graber. The later TE/TF21 had four stacked headlights. Rover aquired Alvis in 1965 & car production ceased in 1967, although Alvis continued to make military vehicles. The model itself is by J&M in white-metal.





:wave:

Steve
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,432 Posts
Man! That's nice. Love the color. The wood grain trim in the interior is "typically British." I'm not quite sure what tradition is being upheld by Rover absorbing a smaller car company then totally running it aground. But there sure is a track record of it. JRT is a prime example. Many a great marque and some lesser have fallen under the corporate wheels of Rover. Triumph over my MG's was a particular bitter pill to swallow. If you took 10 MG' Midgets and 10 Spitfires to Road Atlanta at the end of a weekend you'd have 8 Midgets left running and maybe 3 "Spits." If it'd been "JRMG" the MG portion of it might still be afloat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
920 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
ClearHooter said:
Man! That's nice. Love the color. The wood grain trim in the interior is "typically British." I'm not quite sure what tradition is being upheld by Rover absorbing a smaller car company then totally running it aground. But there sure is a track record of it. JRT is a prime example. Many a great marque and some lesser have fallen under the corporate wheels of Rover. Triumph over my MG's was a particular bitter pill to swallow. If you took 10 MG' Midgets and 10 Spitfires to Road Atlanta at the end of a weekend you'd have 8 Midgets left running and maybe 3 "Spits." If it'd been "JRMG" the MG portion of it might still be afloat.
I think you've got this a bit arse around tit. If anything, Rover & Triumph were screwed by MG.

MG, of course, were an offshoot of Morris, which in the '50s merged with Austin, to form BMC. At the time, Rover, Jaguar & Standard-Triumph were totally independent companies. In the '60s, one by one, the smaller companies were absorbed into the conglomerate. A total, utter [email protected]£k up. It ended up with so many marques, most competeing with each other....

In '63, Rover had brought out, the P6 2000, a direct competitor for Triumph's 2000 of the same year.....a few years later they were part of the same combine. It didn't end there, as people from Triumph, were not people from Rover, and vice versa. How else, did the Triumph Stag appear, with a brand new V8, when Rover had an excellent V8, courtesy of Buick, themselves.

Eventually, it all had to end in tears. Strangely, Triumph's nadir was not the the TR7, even though it was built in Speke, by a load of bolshie, neanderthal Scousers, who couldn't stick a stamp on a letter, but, by the Triumph Acclaim, a badge engineered Honda Ballade.....a car usually sold, in "hearing aid beige", to geriatric pensioners......

.....I thought I posted an Alvis..... :confused:

Steve
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
343 Posts
A beautiful car and what an attractive color scheme. My only Alvis is an old Dinky. The Thatcher Rover "coupe" is also very nice in a traditional sort of way.

I don't know what this means: "bolshie, neanderthal Scousers". But it is sure rich, colorful language and I enjoy trying to guess who exactly are the object of this scorn. I figure these have to be union thug workers as I believe them alone to be the cause of the demise of the once proud British car industry; the threat of the union destruction of the US domestic auto manufacturers is now quite obvious. I hate to admit it as I like Fords and Ford history so much, but the UAW is the reason Hyundais built in Alabama, Nissans from Mississippi and now Toyota trucks from San Antonio are providing very difficult competition for our once proud "big three".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,432 Posts
Hummmmmmmm....This is the take we got on this side of the pond as I recall from reading R&T. The individual marques started out all in competition with each other. BMC was the first major merger that ment anything to me. Somewhere around '68 or 9'ish Leyland took over BMC and Triumph. If anything else was included in the deal I'm unsure. At this time there was a socialist movement going on in the UK. This filtered down to Leyland in a rivalary between the old non union BMC group and the unionized Triumph crew so as to even keep MG from getting engines and tranny's. Hence when the rubber, baby, buggy, bumpered, jokes came out they were forced to use Triumph engines and tranny's in the Midgets. This worked like a type "A" body receiving a type "B-" liver. The car actually rejected the things. If what you were saying about Leyland and JRT translates to "both companies were run by idiots that didn't know the difference between a spanner and a fastner. We are in complete agreement on that point. The TR7 was a bad joke. Worst piece of crap I ever worked on from the UK. Don't know how they performed over there but over here they wouldn't go 50 miles without a major malfunction. MGB (GT?) did get to use the aluminum, Buick V8 for a year or so. But I don't think any were actually imported if they even got past the concept stge over there.

Yeah you did post an Alvis. But you brought up that "gobble monster." I still miss the old Octagon.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top