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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I use those airbrush cans, and I think an air compressor would save you in the long run.
Does this look like a decent enough Air Compressor for an airbrush?



PSI: 250
Power: 12 volt DC
Amps: 10
Gauge Range: 20psi - 250psi
 

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Based on the picture I'd say no. There are two reasons for my answer:

1) The power supply looks to be strictly 12 volt using an automotive adapter. Unless you plan to do all your painting in the front seat of your car, this won't work.

2) The air hose is fixed to the compressor with only a clamp-on style end to fit the valve stem of a tire. You'll need one that uses a threaded connection so that your airbrush hose adapter can be used.

You can get a whole range of compressors made specifically for airbrushes from Badger, Iwata, Silent Aire, etc. but the prices can sometimes be a bit high. You might want to consider stopping by the local Sears, Lowes, or Home Depot and check out their smaller compressors. You can find ones with 3-7 gallon air tanks for about the same price as the ones dedicated to airbrushes mentioned above.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
That's what I thought, because I have a hose with a threaded tip, and it looks like there isn't a connection like that. I saw that it had a car adapter plug in, but I thought I could just use:


Yeah, I don't think this would work, anyone know of a reasonably priced air compressor, since I won't be using it that often.
 

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fiercegaming said:
That's what I thought, because I have a hose with a threaded tip, and it looks like there isn't a connection like that...anyone know of a reasonably priced air compressor, since I won't be using it that often.
It used to be, that you could buy adapters to use with inner tubes. That's a reasonably cheap way to go, if you have a gas station close by, and can afford the space.

You might be able to use a similar adapter with the pictured compressor, and power it with a high-power HO power pack. This would also give you some control of the flowrate.
 

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You might also watch the papers for used ones, I got mine at a garage sale for $5.

As far as the set-up shown, it looks like garbage as far as airbrushing goes. You'd probably be better off with the el-cheapo Testors craft compressor they carry at Walmart.
 

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Those adapters for hooking up to household current are expensive to run and produce lots of head.

Places like Lowe's and Home Depot often run packages where you can get an air compressor and a brad nailer as a combo (and comes with hoses and connectors) for around $120-$130. Maybe more than you want to spend on just an air compressor but for that you get a decent little tool with it as well.

Another idea is go to a Tractor Supply store if you have one in your town. They sometimes have tools of less known name for less money as well.
 

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I say the first one because it has the standard 1/4" NPT outlet so you can use it for more than just an air-brush compressor.

It may be considered overkill but my second compressor was a 22 gallon with digital controls. You always know the exact output pressue and at 22 gallons it will drive an airbursh for 100 years before the motor kicks in.
 

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Is it better to have a compressor with a tank or one with out? What advantage does a tank have?

How is the tank refilled?
 

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Can't say that I've ever seen an air compressor without a tank. The tank is the air source and the motor/pump is used to recharge the tank. Without the tank the motor would run constantly to supply the airflow.
 

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Four Mad Men said:
Can't say that I've ever seen an air compressor without a tank. The tank is the air source and the motor/pump is used to recharge the tank. Without the tank the motor would run constantly to supply the airflow.

Thanks for the advice 4MM, I do appreciate it. The other 2 compressors in the links I provided do not have a tank. My compressor I use currently also does not have a tank. It goes on once I spray, and off when I release the trigger.

It appears though that I want a model WITH a tank. Is that right?
 

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I'd say with. And if you go with the first one which is a more standard shop type tool you can use it for all sorts of things like filling car tires, running small air tools like finish nailers, etc.
 

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Great :)

Thank 4MM. Appreciate your time.
 

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There are a couple of advantages to a tank, the biggest one is you won't get any pulsating effect, you get a steady stream of air. Most craft compressors do pulsate to some degree, however that said, a lot of people do amazing work with non-tank compressors.
 

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You should go out to the hardware store and get a quick connect fitting and moisture filter for the hose. Filter should run about $9-$10 for one with replaceable silica-gel desiccant. For the quick connect fitting see if you can find a combo pack with the hose fitting as well as the tool connectors (should run about $5-$6). The threaded coupler on your airbrush will screw right onto the fitting. That way you can quick change whatever you might hook up to it (don't forget the teflon tape for the threads too).

On a side note, if you plan on using it for car tires I'd loose the chuck that comes with it and get one with a built in pressure gauge. Try to find one with a dial gauge if you can, those are really easy to read (at least for my old tired eyes they are).
 
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