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Discussion Starter #1
Having more spare time than usual, and looking around at other modeling sites, Wonderfest photos, and others, a couple of question come to mind.

#1-- Is 3D printing cheating? In other words, instead of correcting a defect in a kit with putty, sanding, and cutting styrene, to make the part correct, is just printing the correct part cheating? Does anyone know what the judges of contests (such as Wonderfest) feel about this?

#2-- When doing figure modeling, I've always had a problem getting hair to look like hair. It always looks (to me) like painted hair. Is putting synthetic or real hair on a model allowed?

#3-- Final question. Where is everybody? I only started posting again on this site after a 9 1/2 year hiatus. There seemed to me more activity 10 years ago. I went to a forum (here) where someone was asking for help with a model and then I realized the post was 4 years old. Needless to say, I'm sure he (or she) has gotten help by now. So, where did everyone go?

Thanks.
 

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Having more spare time than usual, and looking around at other modeling sites, Wonderfest photos, and others, a couple of question come to mind.

#1-- Is 3D printing cheating? In other words, instead of correcting a defect in a kit with putty, sanding, and cutting styrene, to make the part correct, is just printing the correct part cheating? Does anyone know what the judges of contests (such as Wonderfest) feel about this?

#2-- When doing figure modeling, I've always had a problem getting hair to look like hair. It always looks (to me) like painted hair. Is putting synthetic or real hair on a model allowed?

#3-- Final question. Where is everybody? I only started posting again on this site after a 9 1/2 year hiatus. There seemed to me more activity 10 years ago. I went to a forum (here) where someone was asking for help with a model and then I realized the post was 4 years old. Needless to say, I'm sure he (or she) has gotten help by now. So, where did everyone go?

Thanks.

same place you went.

:eek:
 

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Like everything else in the hobby these same questions were asked when kits changed from carved wood, vinyl, resin, etc

So to me it is not cheating - just a change to different media and related skill sets.

And as long as you play by the posted (given) rules you should be okay.

I personally dont think you can get the same scale appearance realism with either synthetic or real hair in smaller scale models though. (Even the hair on really expensive collectible dolls doesnt look real to me even when they use real human hair - its close, but just doesnt look natural to me.)

The same type changes apply here (and at other sites). The online blog replaced the magazine and collector club newsletters for the most part. (When even still have a newsletter section here in HobbyTalk.) And then different types of blogs came along - facebook, twitter, etc For me, I Iike the ability to go back and review the more permanent archival media type of our blog format and not the eventually 'disappearing' aspects of many other formats like facebook and twitter, etc. Many of those other blog styles have went away and were lost over time - along with their content!. And regretablly, we have also lost many of our type of blog sites over time as well though. Thankfully; Vertical Scope had promised to keep us around for as long as they were around. Here's to hoping that is a long time to come.

Although, I did notice the 'Computer' on Star Trek has never referenced us. Though they did have a few 'ship' models in the back ground of their personal quarters. 🤙
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Like everything else in the hobby these same questions were asked when kits changed from carved wood, vinyl, resin, etc
I agree to an extant. However, we have to put work into making the wood, vinyl, or resin work in the model we are given. We don't just print up a new part (or print up a whole model).

I personally dont think you can get the same scale appearance realism with either synthetic or real hair in smaller scale models though. (Even the hair on really expensive collectible dolls doesnt look real to me even when they use real human hair - its close, but just doesnt look natural to me.) 🤙
I saw some photos of models at Wonderfest last year, and the figures didn't have "painted" hair. The hair was either synthetic or real, I couldn't determine from the photos.
 

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Having more spare time than usual, and looking around at other modeling sites, Wonderfest photos, and others, a couple of question come to mind.

#1-- Is 3D printing cheating? In other words, instead of correcting a defect in a kit with putty, sanding, and cutting styrene, to make the part correct, is just printing the correct part cheating? Does anyone know what the judges of contests (such as Wonderfest) feel about this?

#2-- When doing figure modeling, I've always had a problem getting hair to look like hair. It always looks (to me) like painted hair. Is putting synthetic or real hair on a model allowed?

#3-- Final question. Where is everybody? I only started posting again on this site after a 9 1/2 year hiatus. There seemed to me more activity 10 years ago. I went to a forum (here) where someone was asking for help with a model and then I realized the post was 4 years old. Needless to say, I'm sure he (or she) has gotten help by now. So, where did everyone go?

Thanks.
As for the question about 3D printing...cheating, with as much work as I put into creating bases, adding "things" to the figure or changing something about the figure itself to make it look the way I want it to look...no, I don't think 3D printing is cheating. It's still a pretty new concept and WE have so many "cast" models in our stashes...
 

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A lot of people haven't figured out where the edit function is - it's a drop down you access by clicking on those three vertical dots in the upper right corner of your post.

As for hair - there's a guy on a facebook modeling group who does real hair on 1/12 scale portrait heads. Between the real hair and his amazing painting skills, you'd swear you were looking at a photo of the real actor. His Ragnar from Vikings is an especially amazing accomplishment.
 

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Back to iriseye's questions:

#1-- Is 3D printing cheating? I don't think so; as others have said, it's just another item in the tool box. As far as IPMS or WonderFest judges are concerned, it's the quality of the finished model that counts. Neither organization bans the use of photo-etched, cast resin, or any other type of aftermarket parts on models, so I can't imagine that they'd have a problem with 3-D printed ones.

#2-- ...I've always had a problem getting hair to look like hair. My own experience with hair is that, under 1/3 scale, any type of hair is too coarse for a scale appearance (though I hope that Mr. Payne can point me to the Facebook group that has photos of hair being successfully applied to a 1/12 scale figure). In order to paint hair realistically, I've studied what real hair looks like.

Unless it's very fine, hair covers the scalp sufficiently to create shadows. Thus, I start by paining the entire area with the darkest color - black, dark brown, maybe a lighter brown for a light blonde, or gray for white hair. It's important to have the hairline blend softly into the skin, so as I'm applying the darkest flesh colors (using artist oils, which give me phenomenal control) I work them well up into the hair. Then, when I apply this dark hair color, I fade it at the hair line, where hair gets thinner and shades the underlying skin to a lesser degree. I usually use Testors oil-base paints to color hair, so simply thinning the dark color with mineral spirits gives me that soft blend.

Once this work has set, I drybrush lighter colors to pick up the highlights of the hair. I save the lightest colors for the highest contours and the hairline, where that fine hair is. Often I add metallic colors - metallic blue for black, copper for red hair, gold for blondes - to create the sheen real hair has. There's something else I've learned to do that makes for really real-looking hair. If you study people's hair, you will see subtle color shifts where light hits the hair at different angles. This is mostly notable with very dark hair: the highlights that receive light at the most direct angles, like the top of the head or the outer edge of a curve, have a slightly bluish tone. Where light strikes the hair at a more oblique angle, the highlights take on a reddish tint. Again, by looking at real people in person, in movies, or even photographs, you can get a sense of where and how intensely to paint these tints. For black hair, I'll apply metallic blue, which I mix from silver and dark blue; the warm highlights are usually dark brown mixed with a little copper. Lighter color hair works the same way, it's mainly the intensity of the tints that need to change with the hair color.

I do like to seal any paint job under a clear finish, usually Testors Dullcote, after which I restore the various levels of gloss that might be needed (certainly the eyes!). Same with the hair, and here is where I take one final step to make it look real. The crevices where the darkest color is lurking stay flat, because that's where the shadows are. I will carefully brush a bit of gloss on only the highest areas of the hair, where light is reflected the most. Future Floor Polish (or whatever the h3ll they call it now) is great for this, because one light application will create a semi-gloss sheen, while a second coat on only the high points will make those areas shinier.

I know this sounds like a lot of work, but hair is more complex than most people realize, when it comes to painting. I've attached a photo of a pretty unrealistic character with hair that came out an almost iridescent appearance when you're looking at it in person and can move it around. N
307412
aturally, a static photo doesn't really do it justice.


#3-- Final question. Where is everybody? I hate myself for having to answer this way, but Facebook is the culprit. I miss the good old days here, too, and make an effort to get back on a regular basis.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
#1-- Is 3D printing cheating? In other words, instead of correcting a defect in a kit with putty, sanding, and cutting styrene, to make the part correct, is just printing the correct part cheating? Does anyone know what the judges of contests (such as Wonderfest) feel about this?
I should have qualified this a bit further. I've seen a lot of 3D printed objects which have been entered into model contests, so I guess it's accepted. But as far as the hobby goes, printing a whole ship, spacecraft, or robot and then painting it--Is that modeling?
 

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If you go to the common definitions of modeling - they mostly call modeling as making something in 3 diminisions. So in its simply form 3D printing is the definition of modeling.

In this case, you dont buy a boxed model kit - you buy or design the parts in a digital box.
 

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Dali said it best. "Drawing is the honesty of the art. There is no possibility of cheating. It's either good or bad.

While I don't wholeheartedly agree with the last part. Because ya know about opinions. I do agree with the first. However you accomplish the finished product is up to you.
 
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