Hobbyist Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 45 Posts

·
Cautiously Optimistic
Joined
·
5,017 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Fellow Proteus nut Drew Huffman, the man largely responsible for this kit, was kind enough to forward me the first casting out of the gate to build as a sample piece. The following build log will give those interested a chance to see the model come together (for those not familiar with the subject, this is the experimental submarine featured in Fantastic Voyage).

The parts a crisply molded – and there are a lot of them...





After a small amount of sanding and puttying (the latter to fill in a couple of small bubbles on the window frame) the hull halves were given a medium coat of grey primer.



The halves are designed to sandwich together so the top can be removed for a better view of the interior. Prep work continues, but this gives you some idea of where I'm at on Day One of the build.



Still a little puttying and sanding to do, but she's off to a good start.



For display purposes, the kit includes a pair of support pieces like those seen in the film’s miniaturization sequence. As an option I also drilled a small hole in order to accommodate an aluminum rod (not included with the kit).

This model was a labor of love for Drew. The result, I think it’s fair to say, is the most accurate version of the subject produced to date. Proteus fans will not be disappointed.

For additional info re: where to order got here…

http://www.needfulthings.net/host/crowsnest/catalog/index.php

Stay tuned for additional updates.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,620 Posts
Rob! Beautiful! It is sooo nice to see her on someone else's workbench, and I am honored that it is yours! I can't wait to see her come to life!

Nektu... she is in casting right now. I am not doing any lists as it just gets too crazy. The day job doesn't leave me all that much time to devote to the models so I try to keep it simple on my end. I will put her up on the Crow's Nest site as soon as I have accumulated enough stock that I won't run out of stock immediately. I hope to offer her in January some time.

www.crowsnestmodels.com
 

·
Cautiously Optimistic
Joined
·
5,017 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Yeah, kids and visiting relatives have kept me pretty busy of late. Instead of building the Proteus I've been building Legos...



Thing is, if I can assemble this I can assemble anything.

I'll post a Proteus update soon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
Rob,

As one who shys away from after-market or garage kits due to the lack of skills most of the rest of you clearly display (I learned my true abilities after attempting Lunar's J2 and Proteus twenty years ago.... ended up having a pro build the J2... the Proteus still rests in pieces in its box), is the Crow's Nest kit something someone like me (who can handle factory kits pretty well) could tackle without much frustration or special skills? I want an accurate model of the U-91035 (especially something I can display in a smaller space) but have really very little experience with resin aftermarket kits. I'll trust your judgement on this one.

Thanks in advance

Mike
 

·
Cautiously Optimistic
Joined
·
5,017 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
is the Crow's Nest kit something someone like me (who can handle factory kits pretty well) could tackle without much frustration or special skills?
Good question, Mike.

This is certainly a much easier kit to build than the Lunar Proteus.

In terms of "special skills" it would help to know how to use spot putty and a sanding stick but, honestly, the assembly is not rocket science. The hardest part will probably be trimming and gluing the windows in place.

The one "skill" you really need to have above all is patience. You can't be in a rush, and you can't expect the thing to go together without a little effort. Nothing about this build is especially hard, but doing the job right does take time.

Work and family have been keeping me pretty busy the last few days, but I'll be posting more pix soon. Hopefully they'll give you a better idea of what's involved assembly-wise.

But, yeah, even I gave up on the Lunar Jupiter 2. That thing was a nightmare!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
319 Posts
Mike--

One of the great secrets of good modeling is the ability to re-do. Rob has shown in his posts here that things don't always go smoothly, and the art of re-doing work is pretty important.

My friends who come over and build with me know this is VERY true for me. I mess up as much as the next guy, but I excel at fixing my boo-boos!

So don't think you have to be a perfect modeler. Patience is key, and not sweating it when things go wrong.

Lee
 

·
Cautiously Optimistic
Joined
·
5,017 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Man, if you can take Lee's words of wisdom to heart two things will happen: A) you’ll build better models, and B) you’ll have more fun building them. If there’s a secret model making happiness, that’s it.

Which brings us to a small update.

I spent a fair amount of time sanding, priming, and spot-filling the upper and lower hull halves. I did this not because of any deficiencies with the kit but because the hull is what most people will spend the most time looking at when the model is done, and one of the keys to a smooth, even finish is a properly prepped hull. Fact is, prepping and finishing the hull will probably account for 1/3 of the total build time on this kit (unless, you know, I really screw something up).

Anyway, here’s where I’m at after approximately 18 hours of (non-consecutive) work time…



After getting the hull halves basically where I wanted them contour-wise I affixed the upper tail to the upper hull using “super glue.” A little auto-body filler helped smooth out the seam where the tail met the hull. To make sure the lower fin aligned properly with the top fin I taped the two hull halves together, and used small magnets to clamp the lower fin in place. This allowed for minute adjustments prior to permanent bonding with glue (those little magnets really come in handy for this sort of thing).

A fine-toothed jeweler’s saw also came in handy for trimming out certain parts (although the manufacturer appears to have done most of the trimming for me. I have to hand it to Drew and his team; the parts are very crisp and detailed, and very little clean-up work was required).





Here’s rough test-fit of the interior parts. This is basically a “color test” to make sure the shades I’ve selected for the interior “jibe” with one another. It may be hard to tell from these shots, but five different shades of grey were used (I’ll post a complete paint list at the end of the thread).




A note about the paint scheme: when it comes to the Proteus interior the only thing we really have to go by is the movie itself. That being the case, my “reference data” was limited to frame grabs from the Fantastic Voyage DVD. Suffice it to say it’s not an exact science, so if my choices seem “off” to you feel free to disregard them.






After applying a base coat to the interior cavities of both hull halves I masked those areas off and applied several light mist coats of Tamiya Pure White straight out of the rattle-can. I slowly built up a fairly thick base coat of white, because I intend to go over the cured surface with polishing abrasives in a couple of days (to get rid of any residual “orange peel” texture in the finish), and I don’t want to accidentally sand through the finish.



Here’s where Lee’s advice comes in handy…

When I was prepping the lower hull I failed to properly protect the small circular ballast vents from overzealous sanding. As a result most of the detail was lost (sorry, Drew). In order to correct this I sanded down the damaged vents entirely, punched small replacement vents out of thin-gage styrene, scored horizontal lines with the back of an X-acto blade, and glued the vents to the lower hull prior to laying down the white base coat.

Unfortunately the replacement vents ended up looking like crap when painted (too thick and gunky), so I’ve decided to pry them off and start over.

It’s not the end of the world, but it would have saved me some trouble if I’d been more careful when sanding the hull. One or two accidental swipes of sandpaper and you can kiss those raised resin details goodbye!



Stay tuned for another update (probably next Monday).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,662 Posts
That's a beautiful gloss white finish -- and it hasn't even been polished yet! The bottom half looks like a futuristic porcelain plumbing fixture.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,444 Posts
"several light mist coats of Tamiya Pure White straight out of the rattle-can".

Rob - is that what will form the finish for the hull?

How do you find that from a handling perspective? For example, when you sand the hull, do you hold it in your hands? How stury is the paint? Is it soft and subject to marring when you handle the model to work on it? Or, is it tough enough to withstand that?

Cheers!

Huzz
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,662 Posts
Nice kit. Looks like it was injection molded!
I was going to say the same thing. The parts have a precision and crispness of detail that you don't usually see in resin kits. I'm sure that's largely due to the use of digital prototyping to create the master patterns, plus first-class craftsmanship in the production of the actual kit parts. Looking at the pictures, it's still hard to believe the model is just over 7-1/2 inches long.
 

·
Cautiously Optimistic
Joined
·
5,017 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
"several light mist coats of Tamiya Pure White straight out of the rattle-can".

Rob - is that what will form the finish for the hull?
Yeah, it's the same stuff I used on my Lunar Models Proteus. Ditto the Moebius Flying Sub.

I generally allow a couple of days cure time before sanding Tamiya synthetic lacquer, especially when I've laid it on as thick as I have here. After two days the stuff is absolutely ready to be handled, and the finish is as durable as the finish on a model this size will ever need to be.

I mean, if I was modeling a larger subject (like, say, an RC sub like those Dave Merriman builds) I'd use auto lacquer, but for a smaller scale model I've found Tamiya paints to be really hard to beat.

I know some of the car guys like to top off the base color with a glossy clearcoat, but I've never seen the point-- especially when working with white (which clear coats tend to yellow).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,444 Posts
Thanks Rob!

When I did my Wilco Proteus I used Duplicolor car paint for a rugged finish. Its good to know that I can go with something different!

Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
Rob, Lee, thanks for the words of advice and encouragement! I think I'm going to take the plunge and attempt this kit, and your advice (and build-up progress) will be invaluable. While I know I'll never be as good as the pro who built my Lunar Gemini XII for me (Jim Key.... a master), I think I can do this kit justice. BTW Rob, beautiful work so far! I would have never thought to use tools such as small magnets to align parts for test fitting, matching sanding contours, etc. Ilearn something new every time I visit this site!

Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
Rob,

Any updates on this exciting build-up? We'd love to see any further progress made (cannon fodder for those of us considering tackling this all-time-favorite sci-fi conveyance).

Best Regards,

Mike
 
1 - 20 of 45 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top