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I dunno, man. I think you need another coat of paint on that, I can still see the lines.

:)
:laugh:
Totally funny, yet true -- the grid is getting some very thin hull color in some spots to tone it down, especially the rings. I made the radii with a sharp HB pencil, but forgot my compass just had regular soft lead in it. You really want to do this with an HB lead.

Also, when erasing this stuff for touchups, an Eraser Mate eraser works great, but use multiple light passes. If you grind on it you'll start to rub off paint. :smile2:
 

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:laugh:
Totally funny, yet true -- the grid is getting some very thin hull color in some spots to tone it down, especially the rings. I made the radii with a sharp HB pencil, but forgot my compass just had regular soft lead in it. You really want to do this with an HB lead.

Also, when erasing this stuff for touchups, an Eraser Mate eraser works great, but use multiple light passes. If you grind on it you'll start to rub off paint. :smile2:
*heh*

Allow me to re-state my take on the lines. I have the belief that originally, they were nothing more than alignment marks put in place to help ensure correct alignment of the name and numbers in case they used the reversed decals for filming. It would also help with other details. Just in case the lines might show on film more lines were drawn, creating a grid effect and thus, in old computer terms, if they WERE seen it was a 'feature' instead of a 'bug' or flaw. :)

Mind, if they had left it as just a 'pie wedge' of fine lines for that decal alignment it could still have worked. And again, it may well be that Jefferies had re-thought his original 'smooth, seamless' idea as Roddenberry called for more and more detailing. We do have the lines appearing on the scaling 3-view of the ship generated for the AMT box art and the Enterprise/Klingon size comparison. And, oh crap, I have totally forgotten that the AMT kit had embossed grid lines!

Well doo dee doo. I just don't really know anymore. :)
 

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You got Gary's post for the Testors Model Master hull colors, right? This post here.

Tell you what -- I painted a few accent pieces in the correct grays and laid them on the saucer. When you look at the Pratt book chips by themselves, you think these grays are crazy -- they're brown!! But then you place them against the greenish hull, and they're gorgeous. They just work. Pretty awesome! :)
Yes I did!
Remember I posted the color mix after I got the paint in?
I am waiting on the accent colors for my next steps...

I have been sooo busy with fixing up our old house I have not had much time to work on the model...on another note, I just got in the 1.350 Enterprise Refit this weekend!

Another long project awaiting!
 

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Well, frankly, I'm stunned -- I'm not finished with the touchups yet, but I'm already ecstatic with the results. When you airbrush light, thin hull color over pencil, it really does start to look like panel lines.

The very dark radius on the left is going to stay pretty dark, as a nod to the 11' model -- that particular line really sticks out. Anyway, not calling this done just yet, but I'm incredibly happy with it! :)

 

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I think the telling point will be what happens when you hit that with clear green overspray. Or do you plan to omit that part of the 'stage make-up' weathering job?

Because while it may not be 'exactly like the filming miniature' at this point, my instincts are screaming "stop! STOP! It's perfect! Decal the beast and seal it!" ya know?

I know you've got several stages more to go for that 'duplicate the miniature' look but man. That would have been a very credible and pleasing finish for a build 20 years ago. Before we knew and all that. :)
 

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I think the telling point will be what happens when you hit that with clear green overspray. Or do you plan to omit that part of the 'stage make-up' weathering job?

Because while it may not be 'exactly like the filming miniature' at this point, my instincts are screaming "stop! STOP! It's perfect! Decal the beast and seal it!" ya know?

I know you've got several stages more to go for that 'duplicate the miniature' look but man. That would have been a very credible and pleasing finish for a build 20 years ago. Before we knew and all that. :)
Thanks!

Well, not exactly duplicate, since I don't think that's possible at my current skill level. But definitely get "the look," just more subtle to suit the scale.

For the "overspray," by which I think you mean the drybrushed clear green varnish (I think -- Gary?), I'm gonna try out Citadel Shade in Biel-Tan Green. I also have Agrax Earthshade and Seraphim Sepia shades for the lighter and darker streaking that I'm going to try. These are basically incredibly thin acrylic washes you can airbrush right out of the bottle. I'm going to try building up the tan arc with the Sepia and the Earthshade. I have another turquoise wash I'll try for the dorsal front edge.

No idea if they'll work, but it'll be fun! :p
 

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Asalaw, are you lighting this or building it 'static'? I suppose I could go back 20 or so pages and see if you mentioned it but I'm kinda lazy today :)
 

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Asalaw, are you lighting this or building it 'static'? I suppose I could go back 20 or so pages and see if you mentioned it but I'm kinda lazy today :)
Yup! Lighting kit plus full PaulBo (both his PE sets). Working on getting the various parts sub-assembled and painted, then the electronics phase will start. I want to do all the wiring and the motor-silencing trick all at once, since I have to clear my bench for that. Soldering vs. painting. Well, more cheap folding Walmart table than bench. :p

Gonna spend the weekend on the Moebius Batman, though -- Tuesday is the second anniversary of a friend's passing, and I want to post the finished model on his page. And somewhere in there I have to spam my agency list and troll for work... :p

VERY cool!! Love the shading.
Thanks! Just got done touching those up. :)
 

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This has been a running gag with me, but I'm of the opinion that any greenish tint to the model was done to better separate the miniature from the bluescreen (the fuzzy matte lines are proof enough that there were clearly problems photographing the big gray beast against the big blue background, so it makes sense they try whatever they could to differentiate it as much as possible without getting garish).
 

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This has been a running gag with me, but I'm of the opinion that any greenish tint to the model was done to better separate the miniature from the bluescreen (the fuzzy matte lines are proof enough that there were clearly problems photographing the big gray beast against the big blue background, so it makes sense they try whatever they could to differentiate it as much as possible without getting garish).
Well, there was definitely blue spill in some shots, which show up as grainy holes in the saucer. It wouldn't surprise me if a greenish tint was requested for that reason after the second pilot. Gary would know more than I, all I can do is make the educated guess that it's a good reason to tint it green. Come to think of it, I've never paid attention to whether those matte holes occurred in production vs. pilot shots.:smile2:
 

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Well, there was definitely blue spill in some shots, which show up as grainy holes in the saucer. It wouldn't surprise me if a greenish tint was requested for that reason after the second pilot. Gary would know more than I, all I can do is make the educated guess that it's a good reason to tint it green. Come to think of it, I've never paid attention to whether those matte holes occurred in production vs. pilot shots.:smile2:
And remember, we've recently learned that they apparently routinely ran the effects thru a couple of generations, 'stepped on' the shot, to help hide things like mattes and bleed.

It would not surprise me if the green overspray was both additional 'stage make-up' to help keep shapes defined as the film was run thru several generations (and of course always remember that there was still PLENTY of B&W TVs in homes. Color TV hadn't made 100% penetration in homes. Heck, we didn't get a color set until 1972) and a way to help counter 'blue spill' light reflections on that huge, pale mostly flat disc of the saucer.

Let's face it, as much as we all love the Enterprise, it's easy to see what a nightmare that had to be to shoot in 1966 on a comparatively low weekly TV show budget.
 

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And remember, we've recently learned that they apparently routinely ran the effects thru a couple of generations, 'stepped on' the shot, to help hide things like mattes and bleed.
That's one of the most ridiculous suppositions I've heard yet. Spending extra time/money to deliberately degrade the image? The budget and time were tight enough as it was without resorting to such nonsensical measures. Each shot went through only the necessary steps in order to make the comp. No more. Any holes in the mattes would have required time-consuming and expensive rotoscoping in order to fix. Something that was completely outside the allotted budget.

We are all spoiled with our digital tools of today, where cleaning up a problematic matte requires only a few clicks of a mouse and sliding of a control and can be done at a workstation in a few moments. Fifty years ago, those same steps required days or weeks of additional man hours and processes in order to complete. You did what you could with the tools you had and the budget and time available in order to meet the airdate. That's all you could do, whether the end result was perfect or not.
 

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That's one of the most ridiculous suppositions I've heard yet. Spending extra time/money to deliberately degrade the image? The budget and time were tight enough as it was without resorting to such nonsensical measures. Each shot went through only the necessary steps in order to make the comp. No more. Any holes in the mattes would have required time-consuming and expensive rotoscoping in order to fix. Something that was completely outside the allotted budget.

We are all spoiled with our digital tools of today, where cleaning up a problematic matte requires only a few clicks of a mouse and sliding of a control and can be done at a workstation in a few moments. Fifty years ago, those same steps required days or weeks of additional man hours and processes in order to complete. You did what you could with the tools you had and the budget and time available in order to meet the airdate. That's all you could do, whether the end result was perfect or not.
Any viewing of the original VFX in HD will dispel that idea immediately. In some shots the matte lines are thicker than the penants. I'd have to go back and review, but I'm fairly sure they were out of registration in some shots -- something they didn't have the time or money to fix. The mere fact that they had to split the FX work (between Anderson and Van Der Veer, IIRC) shows they were under constant schedule pressure to make their air dates, and hardly in a position to make extensive post-processing work.
 

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I'm sure they weren't highly concerned since viewing on the small grainy B&W screens of the day wouldn't show a lot a detail. Plus when you were a kid watching it you didn't really care anyway.
 

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I'm sure they weren't highly concerned since viewing on the small grainy B&W screens of the day wouldn't show a lot a detail. Plus when you were a kid watching it you didn't really care anyway.
That certainly was my 7-year-old experience. :)

In other news, I'm switching back and forth between the E and Batman, and it turns out it's a lot more fun dividing your time between two kits! Keeps things from getting boring, and keeps you productive during drying times.
 

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According to Paul Newitt, the original color was a bit greenish to begin with:

What Color Is The Classic Enterprise? by Paul M. Newitt ? CultTVman Fantastic Modeling
Well problem with that article is it is rather old and the information within more than a bit subjective and arguably outdated too. Any overspray on Mr. Datin's plans would presumably have been the original paint used on the ship, not necessarily indicative of how it looked in the series.

The Enterprise sure had a greenish tint in photos of it depicted alongside the Botany Bay on the cover of Gerrold's 1973 book "The World of Star Trek". But then lighting conditions, camera, film, and printing process would all have an impact on the perceived color, just as my own 1/350 scale model can look alternately slightly green, slightly blue, and various shades of grey from light to dark in photos I've taken of it.

Heck, the colors in the exact same image of my own model can look different when viewing it on my cellphone, my computer screen, printouts I've made using my own printer, the one at work, and even Shutterfly prints I've ordered. So trying to get the color "just right" compared to the current best educated guess as applied to the 11 footer smacks of whimsy to me.
 
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