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  #1  
Old 03-05-2010, 01:39 PM
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Motor Amp Draw

For all the racers that have played with stock 27 turn motors ,, is there
such a thing as too much amp draw with this type motor?

We still run a 4 cell stk. class and need all the HP we can get.

I have some high amp draw motors but question if that's a good feature.
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  #2  
Old 03-05-2010, 01:50 PM
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Weel it depends on why it's drawing so many amps.. Back when we ran stock it seems like we liked 7 to 9 amps. Anything over that just built up heat during the run. Now 19t that is a different monster....We ran on a 250ft banked ozite oval. (Sandhills) I have had a motor draw alot but it was a pig on the track.. The higher the amp draw the better your car has to be.. Hope this helps....

Ritchie Mac
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  #3  
Old 03-05-2010, 02:20 PM
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Richie is right about a high amp draw motor is more apt to get hotter quicker but I always liked running a 10 to 12 amp motor because most of the time creates more Torq and then I could add more gear to it. But the car has to be pretty free and well handling.
Brooks
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  #4  
Old 03-05-2010, 02:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BRDRACING View Post
Richie is right about a high amp draw motor is more apt to get hotter quicker but I always liked running a 10 to 12 amp motor because most of the time creates more Torq and then I could add more gear to it. But the car has to be pretty free and well handling.
Brooks
Thats pretty close as I'm talking 12-13 amps @ 2.5v w/fan

Some guys I run with that are really fast " say" their running 6 amp motors
but their the same ones who will give you a fictitious roll out number and
then you look and the pinion gear is about a 20 .
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  #5  
Old 03-05-2010, 02:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NCFRC View Post
Thats pretty close as I'm talking 12-13 amps @ 2.5v w/fan

Some guys I run with that are really fast " say" their running 6 amp motors
but their the same ones who will give you a fictitious roll out number and
then you look and the pinion gear is about a 20 .
I'd be one of those guys that was running 6-8, but wouldn't be lyin' about it.

Some guys that ran a lot of amp draw were using maybe bigger springs
than needed.. Keep in mind that the heavier springs are acting
like disc brakes. So you need to find that happy medium, between
keeping the brushes on the com, and slowing it down.

Guys used to do all sorts of stuff to the motors, and put it on the dyno,
and the numbers would be scary high.
But at the end of the race, if you took that motor and made another pull,
it would be right in line with mine.
Fake numbers don't get it done on the track,
Only on the dyno printout.
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  #6  
Old 03-05-2010, 06:05 PM
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6-8 amps...............and whatever you do, do yourself a favor a order some of this. http://www.shopatron.com/products/pr...108.1155.0.0.0?

Don't use it as com drops though......use it to clean the motors after each run. Put several drops in the motor while its running then spray it out with motor spray, let air dry and run it. This stuff turns the com golden like it had a fresh cut and removes any carbon buildup. Using this stuff I rarely cut the coms or changed the brushes.

By using my methode, the motors do gain a lot of rpms and wattage. They will usually only pull 5.5-6.5 amps. You have to drop the gear way down and the motors will run like no other.


If you want to try this, feel free to get back with me.

Brian
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  #7  
Old 03-05-2010, 08:57 PM
Tommygun43 Tommygun43 is offline
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Just a note that GFX's read a bit lower than Turbo 35's. If I remember correctly, it's been a few years now. Every time I cut the amp draw to 5.5, my motors ran like crap. Found out 8 amps on my T35 was 5.5 on a GFX.
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  #8  
Old 03-05-2010, 11:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NCFRC View Post
For all the racers that have played with stock 27 turn motors ,, is there
such a thing as too much amp draw with this type motor?

We still run a 4 cell stk. class and need all the HP we can get.

I have some high amp draw motors but question if that's a good feature.
Yes, there is such a thing as too much amp draw. Amps do not equal watts (electrical HP)

If you call me at the shop M-F, 9-5 EST I can give you a heads-up on what to do to build an A-Main winner...

518-452-0422
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  #9  
Old 03-06-2010, 01:00 AM
Outlaw 44 Outlaw 44 is offline
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I looked for 8 amps with the break-in fan on the motor at 2.5 amps with a GFX.

Just by playing around with the slop of the brush hoods you could affect how many amps the motor draws. Depending on which side of the brush is weaing on the comm more it can decrease or increase the number of amps the motor pulls. You wanna make sure those brushes wear evenly across.

Just remembering how much time I'd spend just realigning the brush hoods reminds me why I loved the switch to brushless. Then there was the brush timing jig too, that was fun ugggh.
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  #10  
Old 03-06-2010, 02:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Metal View Post
6-8 amps...............and whatever you do, do yourself a favor a order some of this. http://www.shopatron.com/products/pr...108.1155.0.0.0?

Don't use it as com drops though......use it to clean the motors after each run. Put several drops in the motor while its running then spray it out with motor spray, let air dry and run it. This stuff turns the com golden like it had a fresh cut and removes any carbon buildup. Using this stuff I rarely cut the coms or changed the brushes.

By using my methode, the motors do gain a lot of rpms and wattage. They will usually only pull 5.5-6.5 amps. You have to drop the gear way down and the motors will run like no other.


If you want to try this, feel free to get back with me.

Brian
Brian's right....I used this stuff and it's killer in a brushed motor. Most slot car tracks stock it.
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  #11  
Old 03-07-2010, 10:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Outlaw 44 View Post
I looked for 8 amps with the break-in fan on the motor at 2.5 amps with a GFX.

Just by playing around with the slop of the brush hoods you could affect how many amps the motor draws. Depending on which side of the brush is weaing on the comm more it can decrease or increase the number of amps the motor pulls. You wanna make sure those brushes wear evenly across.

Just remembering how much time I'd spend just realigning the brush hoods reminds me why I loved the switch to brushless. Then there was the brush timing jig too, that was fun ugggh.
Not to change this thread but theres alot of us in this sport including myself which I'd call motorheads. But thats a general statement that includes anything about the car mechanically , not just the motor.
Brushless is great for the racer who doesn't enjoy tinkering and it's overall
less money. What it's done is kill off half of the suppliers of RC parts and the
others will see less sales in the future.
When we race dirt bikes I enjoy working in the garage more than the day at
the races. I guess a lot of people don't .
You can't become obsessive about brushed motor tuning but you do get a sense of accomplishment when you can do it right.
Just my 2 cents.
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  #12  
Old 03-07-2010, 03:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NCFRC View Post
Not to change this thread but theres alot of us in this sport including myself which I'd call motorheads. But thats a general statement that includes anything about the car mechanically , not just the motor.
Brushless is great for the racer who doesn't enjoy tinkering and it's overall
less money. What it's done is kill off half of the suppliers of RC parts and the
others will see less sales in the future.
When we race dirt bikes I enjoy working in the garage more than the day at
the races. I guess a lot of people don't .
You can't become obsessive about brushed motor tuning but you do get a sense of accomplishment when you can do it right.
Just my 2 cents.
Good post. It is unfortunate that the people who actually enjoy working on every variable of racing to gain an advantage have become the minority.

There are a lot of areas / variable that can be improved on with brushless motors as well. Although not as many as brushed, still plenty to gain an advantage over those who don't.
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  #13  
Old 03-07-2010, 03:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Todd Putnam View Post
Yes, there is such a thing as too much amp draw. Amps do not equal watts (electrical HP)

If you call me at the shop M-F, 9-5 EST I can give you a heads-up on what to do to build an A-Main winner...

518-452-0422
Thanks Todd ,

I will give you a call this next week.

Greatly appreciate the help !!
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  #14  
Old 03-21-2010, 05:31 AM
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OK ,,, I'm starting to become a believer .

I ran a 9 amp motor in the feature yesterday and did that thing rip
compared to the 11.5 amp motor I qualified with.

Gotta change my way of motor tuning.
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