View Full Version : Strange Ryobi Problem


MikeinMadison
12-01-2004, 10:10 PM
Thanks for any help!
I am building a small hovercraft and plan to use a Ryobi 31cc for propulsion. It ran like a top until I accidentally tried to start it clockwise. It didn't fire, and then I realized what I was doing and got it to fire and stall on full choke normally (counterclockwise). But then it wouldn't start on partial choke like it should have. I have checked the obvious stuff -- plug and fuel -- even changed the gaskets and block, but it's behaving the same way. Any ideas? Thanks!
Mike

bugman
12-02-2004, 02:33 AM
make sure the diaphram is good and the carb didn't get any crap in it from the counter clockwise way of trying to start it. i would take it off and take it apart then dip it in cleaning solution then try.

hankster
12-02-2004, 10:11 AM
First thing to do is figure out if it is an ignition/compression or fuel problem. Spray a little carb cleaner or a squirt of gas in the carb and see if it will fire. If it does, it's most likely a fuel system problem. If it won't it's most likely an ignition or compression problem.

Most common Ryobi fuel system problems are dirty carbs (as bugman said) and broken/cracked fuel lines.

Most common Ryobi ignition problem is a sheared flywheel key.

Most common Ryobi compression problems are a scuffed piston/cylinder and loose cylinder bolts.

MikeinMadison
12-02-2004, 10:58 PM
Thanks guys!
I'll clean the carb and get some starter fluid.

bbnissan
12-03-2004, 10:47 AM
I'm willing to bet the problem is a sheared flywheel key just as Hankster said. The only problem is that Ryobi uses a flywheel with the key made on to it. You can't replace the key without replacing the whole flywheel (which can be expensive). But don't worry, you can repair it if you are careful. Just mark the flywheel and crankshaft where the key use to go, rough the crankshaft up a little bit with some emory cloth, apply a small amount of JB Weld epoxy to the crankshaft, put the flywheel back on and carefully tighten it so that the marks stay lined up. Let the epoxy setup over night and it should crank right up.

I've fixed several Ryobi blowers (customer units after telling them how much the flywheel would cost) like this and I've never had a problem with them breaking again. The epoxy fills in the void where the key use to be and acts as a new key....it also makes a tighter fit between the crankshaft and flywheel which will help prevent the new "key" from breaking.

bugman
12-03-2004, 05:16 PM
yeah that suck with the keys. thats how they make their money. but if it ain't that its most likely the carb. but like sometimes i've found out when i start one with a drill the key would wear out on most. but that epoxy is alot better than a new flywheel