View Full Version : Remember when..........


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NUM11BLADE
01-06-2006, 09:52 AM
This site can take you back.http://toyadz.com/toyadz/menu1.html

Batfink
01-15-2006, 10:03 AM
Hey foks! Remember when you went down to the local Drug store or Ben franklin's and picked up a model, got home layed out the main parts on some news print, got out the ol' rattle can gave it a good shot.....started in on the interior, landing gear etc and had that bad boy together before that night or the next day? Those were the days....
They sure were................. :cry: :) ....Two places where I could always find a great selection of models....Community Drug in my hometown of Northford,and Mammoth Mart in North Haven....Auroras,Monogram Tom Daniels,Lindberghs,.....I'm sure gonna miss all this when Alzheimer's kicks in....... :p .........

scotpens
01-15-2006, 02:05 PM
Back when I was ten or eleven years old, I used to get great deals on models at the local Pick 'n' Save, which was an outlet for slightly damaged or unclaimed freight. They had a whole section of model kits and toys, usually with only minor cosmetic damage to the box, for about one-third to one-half off the standard retail price. And that was when a 1/25 scale car kit cost two or three dollars! That was where I got a lot of the Aurora monsters and Revell's Chicken Little kit (the one showing the stages of gestation of a chicken inside the egg).

fluke
01-16-2006, 11:15 AM
Cool! but could you eat it? :tongue:

lonfan
01-17-2006, 10:50 AM
Scotpens- I remember the same Place in Virginia it was called "Salvage Barn" I was able to buy these Revell 'Endangered Animals" Kits for IIRC $.50 Cause they had been in a Fire,I actually had to wipe Soot off the boxes and in one case I think it was a Polar Bear was Semi Melted in the Box Also the Mego Spocks were being sold with somekind of Molding Defect in the Legs that made one of his Legs look like the Stay-Puff Marshmellow Man! lol I probly should have kept him seeing how all these Imperferfections seem to Equal $$ nowadays lol But he instead Became a "Red Shirt" involved in a Savage battle with the Mego "General Urko" and the Apes! lol

John/Lonfan

MJB
02-16-2006, 12:50 PM
For me, my best model memories are when I would go to what would now be called a 'mom and pop' store to buy my Aurora kits. I remember the place being filled with lots of planes and ships but I only cared for the Monsters or Superheros. I remember taking my my hard earned $1.01 ( $0.98 plus tax) to the store and plopping it down for the newest Monster or the Superhero. I remember being suprised that my $1.01 wouldn't cover the Batman kit and I had to work extra hard for that $0.49 plus the tax. He also had what I know know as the Disney Man in Space 3 stage Rocket. I was able to buy it for a buck or two when he went out of business. It didn't hit me as hard then, sadly, as it does now. Michael

roadrner
02-16-2006, 01:51 PM
because i dressed badly and my hair sucked!!

i look way better now!


But didn't we all ? Now some of those styles are back and the kids are going crazy with it. :freak:

Great post Fluke, some great experiences here. :thumbsup: rr

Zorro
02-18-2006, 02:21 PM
Robot Commando, Big Loo, King Zor, Battle of The Blue and Gray, Fort Apache, Atomic Cape Canaveral, Operation Moonbase, Operation X-500, Astro Ray Gun, Jimmy Jet, "Sold Only at Your Favorite Food Market!" "Two Whole Armies in a Footlocker For 99 Cents! "Own Your Own Life-Sized Submarine for $1.98!" Little Giants, Superior Gas Station, Playmobile, X-Ray Specs, Sea Monkeys, Trik Trak, Crashmobile, Erector Set, Combat!, Tinkertoys, Frogman, Matchbox Cars, Plasticville, Give-A-Show Projector, Play-Doh Fun Factory, Bubble Gum Cards, Jiffy Pop, Rat Finks, Trolls, Flasher Rings, Ben Cooper Halloween Costumes, Superball, Silly Putty, Flubber, Colorforms, Wooly Willy, Cootie, Barrel of Monkeys, Beany Copter, Slinky, Funny Face, Soakys, Silly Soap, Incredible Edibles, Operation!, Fighting Men, Fright Factory, Stony Burke, Mighty Mo, Tiger Joe, Defender Dan, Big Caesar, Battlewagon, Guns of The Golden Agent, Mattel Shootin' Shell, Crime Buster, Agent Zero-M Radio Rifle, Lie Detector, Hamilton's Invaders, Captain Action.

beeblebrox
02-18-2006, 04:56 PM
Had these from the time I was four.
http://www.chem.sunysb.edu/msl/lego/apb6.jpg
I think the set I had was called the "Bucket-O-Choking Hazard". :thumbsup:

That's me on the right. :rolleyes:

John P
02-19-2006, 10:32 AM
Crashmobile!!
Damn, that was fun. Nowadays it'd probably be banned so as not to "send a message to children that traffic accidents are acceptable" or some such nonsense.

Zorro
02-19-2006, 11:51 AM
Crashmobile!!
Damn, that was fun. Nowadays it'd probably be banned so as not to "send a message to children that traffic accidents are acceptable" or some such nonsense.

The TV commercial for Deluxe Reading's "Jimmy Jet" probably wouldn't pass muster either. It featured a gleeful 10 year-old tiggering bomb release levers while looking at the plastic TV Jet Screen which lit up and revolved an aerial view of various landscapes. Each time the kid pulled a lever, the commercial cut to actual WW II documentary footage of the bombing of Dresden!!! Talk about "authentic" toys!

scotpens
02-19-2006, 01:42 PM
Crashmobile!!
Damn, that was fun. Nowadays it'd probably be banned so as not to "send a message to children that traffic accidents are acceptable" or some such nonsense.Yeah, I had one of those too. It was fun in a retarded kind of way. Of course, you're right — today, the Crashmobile would be about as politically correct as chocolate and bubble-gum cigarettes!

Zorro
02-19-2006, 03:58 PM
I have a distinct memory of my mother buying me commercially produced "Flubber" - a viscous motor oil colored slime with which you couldn't really do anything in particular beyond letting it seep through your fingers. It might have picked up newsprint like Silly Putty but I remember that it didn't "bounce" like the stuff in the Disney movie. A couple of days after Mom bought it she made me throw it away because it had been taken off the market due to some potentially dangerous "properties". No telling what that stuff was made of. Maybe they buried it at Love Canal.

scotpens
02-19-2006, 04:49 PM
IIRC, "Flubber" was alleged to have caused a skin rash in a handful of kids who played with it — probably about the same percentage of kids who are allergic to peanuts (A quarter of one percent? A tenth of one percent?), resulting in peanut-butter-and-jelly sandwiches disappearing from thousands of school cafeterias across the country. Isn't it the parents' job to teach their kid what to avoid if the child has an unusual medical condition? The same thing happened with lawn darts — after a couple of freak accidents involving lawn darts, they were no longer sold for fear of lawsuits. As long as we're waxing nostalgic about our old toys, how about some nostalgia for that obsolescent value called PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY?

Not that I meant to give a speech or anything. . .

Zorro
02-19-2006, 05:49 PM
IIRC, "Flubber" was alleged to have caused a skin rash in a handful of kids who played with it — probably about the same percentage of kids who are allergic to peanuts (A quarter of one percent? A tenth of one percent?), resulting in peanut-butter-and-jelly sandwiches disappearing from thousands of school cafeterias across the country. Isn't it the parents' job to teach their kid what to avoid if the child has an unusual medical condition? The same thing happened with lawn darts — after a couple of freak accidents involving lawn darts, they were no longer sold for fear of lawsuits. As long as we're waxing nostalgic about our old toys, how about some nostalgia for that obsolescent value called PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY?

Not that I meant to give a speech or anything. . .

Well, the problem is - how does the parent find out that that the kid has an allergy to peanuts? I've got a six year-old daughter who loves Reece's Pieces but until she discovered them about a year ago I don't think she had ever consumed any peanut products. I think caution is the better way to go in a case like this. Parents can pack a PB&J sandwich for their kid if that's what she likes.

John P
02-19-2006, 07:08 PM
Our coffee table had a Flubber stain on it for YEARS after we threw the stuff away! :lol:

AFILMDUDE
02-20-2006, 02:30 PM
I'm pretty sure the Creepy Crawler Thingmakers were taken off the market - not because they were a hot plate capable of inflicitng some pretty serious burns - but because the plastic creatures you made would slowly start growing some kind of weird mold/fungus that made some kids sick. I can remember the creatures I made slowly turning a fuzzy gray over time. Don't remember ever getting sick.

Zorro
02-20-2006, 02:36 PM
I'm pretty sure the Creepy Crawler Thingmakers were taken off the market - not because they were a hot plate capable of inflicitng some pretty serious burns - but because the plastic creatures you made would slowly start growing some kind of weird mold/fungus that made some kids sick. I can remember the creatures I made slowly turning a fuzzy gray over time. Don't remember ever getting sick.

I had the "Fighting Men" version of The Thingmaker. I definitely remember drawing blood by poking myself a few times with those wire armatures.

scotpens
02-20-2006, 05:25 PM
My younger brother had a Creepy Crawler Thingmaker, and it used to tick him off that I played with it more than he did! Loved making those plastic bugs and lizards and stuff -- and leaving them around the house to gross out our parents.

John P
02-21-2006, 08:35 AM
Five or so years ago, my wife saw a reissue of the Thingmaker at TRU. Trouble was, it was "updated for safety" by replacing the hotplate with an easy-bake-oven-style lightbulb. It just wasn't the same.

Y3a
02-21-2006, 09:35 AM
It was a nice little hot plate! I musta made hundreds of them. I remember going to Sears and buying the BIG bottles of red, yellow and black goop. i remember making about 30 spiders one weekend, so I could decorate my window for halloween. I ended up using mine as a cup warmer! I didn't throw out the metal molds until the mid to late 70's.

Zorro
02-21-2006, 10:43 AM
Any of you old enough to remember when you had to buy your rubber creatures from vending machines? Spiders, centepedes, crayfish, and snakes?
If I remember correctly, they cost 25 cents - a lot of money when you're 5 years old. I also remember when the most expensive balsa wood glider - the one with the red plastic wheels and propeller - was a whopping 25 cents.

Agar
02-21-2006, 11:27 AM
Don't forget the miniture rubber Ratt Finks. I used to get those along with the balsa gliders that were 2 for 5 cents down at the mom and pop store a couple of blocks from my house. Man, would I love to see that place again. They had everything from Famous Monsters of Filmland to models to Marx army sets. The old store was torn down a few years ago and is now a car wash. All I can say is "Reality Stinks!"

Syme
02-21-2006, 09:32 PM
Around age 5 ('73 or so) I was home alone one afternoon (Mom downstairs) when I saw the Frankenstein kit on my brother's bookshelf move by itself. I can picture it now and even recall that light plasticky *skreek* it made as it moved an inch or two as if someone nudged the front of the base from left to right.

No joke.

AFILMDUDE
02-23-2006, 02:28 AM
:eek:

wolfman66
02-23-2006, 04:59 AM
I remember as a kid running down the toy isle by passing the mego dolls and hitting the model section of Two Guys dept store and grabbing my first PS scene kit the sabertooth tiger and then grabbing a couple bottles of testors enamel paint and and laying all the parts out on the floor and hitting them with all different colors. :)

Y3a
02-23-2006, 08:03 AM
I used to go to "Al's Magic Shop" in DC and on one occassion I bought a BIG rubber snake about 5 feet long. It looked pretty real. I Scared ALL my friends with it! LOL
I still have my magic stuff. linking rings, multiplying billiard balls, hippy-hop rabbits, Zombie, Sucker Die Box, and even a Deceptive squared circle! Magic was fun when I was a kid.

John P
02-23-2006, 08:46 AM
I remember as a kid running down the toy isle by passing the mego dolls and hitting the model section of Two Guys dept store and grabbing my first PS scene kit the sabertooth tiger and then grabbing a couple bottles of testors enamel paint and and laying all the parts out on the floor and hitting them with all different colors. :)

You did all that in the store!?! They must have been pissed! :lol:

Hey, was that the Two Guys in Hackensack, or the Two Guys on 46 in Totawa (or was it Wayne?)

wolfman66
02-23-2006, 11:41 AM
You did all that in the store!?! They must have been pissed! :lol:

Hey, was that the Two Guys in Hackensack, or the Two Guys on 46 in Totawa (or was it Wayne?)The two guys in hackensack!Every friday my mother use to bring me there.I got most of my Aurora models there,and the only one to survive my childhood some what was the Rodan kit from the monsters of the movies.If only we knew then what those kits would be worth today,we would all be rich! :)

ChrisW
02-23-2006, 02:01 PM
Ah, time to reminisce...

On Saturday morning if the weather was nice we'd walk to town, otherwise take the bus. We would debark at S.S. Kresge's (the precursor to K-Mart) and go in to check the model aisle, as well as G.I. Joe and the other cool toys we saw advertised on TV. From there we'd head around the corner to Woolworth's, and check out their model collection. Then it was The Boston Store, the Globe, American Auto and whatever other store carried models. Invariably we'd end up at Antracite News, a shop thaty had a wall of practical jokes and novelty items - if you needed fake doggy doo or itching powder, they were guaranteed to have it!
During the better part of the school year my parents enrolled me in the Catholic Youth Center, where on Saturdays we had sessions like swimming, gym, wood shop, etc. For two years they had a Model building session - of course I was under the impression that you had to finish the model within the hour alotted...

PRE-SCENES 2
03-02-2006, 08:21 PM
Grand Central Dept. Store. In the very back, opposite of the front door, was 2 aisles, both sides, of PS kits. Nothin' but. That's when I got hooked. I pleaded with my dad for a Allosaurus. I asked him about that time, he remembered the price was $2.25. "We can't afford it" he said in 1970, of the summer.
I also remember going into Skagg's Drug Store and seeing all the MS and MOTM kits on the two bottom shelves.
AHHHH! the memories!

P-S2

John P
03-03-2006, 08:44 AM
Teah, I had to beg Mom for the $2.50 for the Phantom Mustang when it came out. Were we that bad off? :freak:

Capt Kirk
03-06-2006, 08:05 PM
Remember when you could buy the glue yourself? Didn't have to have or Mom or Dad get it? The only time you sniffed it was as you were glueing something up!

Old_McDonald
03-07-2006, 12:08 PM
I can remember when stores actuall "had" glue. These days, I can't seem to find anything I want unless I order it.

Capt Kirk
03-07-2006, 03:56 PM
Most of the hobby shops around here carry it, but you have to be 21 to buy it. The last time I bought any they actually carded me for it and I'll be 62 next week! That was only a couple of years ago too.

scotpens
03-07-2006, 05:49 PM
In California, you can't buy spray paint either if you're under 18. It's a stupid law -- it certainly hasn't made a dent in the graffiti problem.

Where spray cans are outlawed, only outlaws have spray cans!

John P
03-08-2006, 08:38 AM
Same thing with those spray cans of air you get at computer stores for keyboard cleaning. At least they noticed the gray in my beard and asked if I was over 18 with a wry smile.

PRE-SCENES 2
03-08-2006, 02:25 PM
I remember going downtown, on a public bus (whatelse), most of the time alone, from my quiet neighborhood, to a, in my opinion, a popular hobby shop. This started around the age of 10. I now have 5 kids, oldest 14, and I won't let them travel alone or ride public transportation without some sort of supervision! Over protection? or different times?

P-S2

Old_McDonald
03-08-2006, 03:01 PM
I remember going downtown, on a public bus (whatelse), most of the time alone, from my quiet neighborhood, to a, in my opinion, a popular hobby shop. This started around the age of 10. I now have 5 kids, oldest 14, and I won't let them travel alone or ride public transportation without some sort of supervision! Over protection? or different times?

P-S2

Definitely different times. These days, with kids pushing dope on the streets, you just can't be too careful when unsupervised. In my day, our local theater had a Saturday afternoon film festival. I went to the movies and got the following every Saturday afternoon when my mother dropped me and my friends off.:

1) Cartoon - usually Tom and Jerry
2) Serial - Flash Gordon, Buck Rogers or an episode from the Radarmen from the moon type stuff.
3) Main movie - Usually a current B SciFi or Horror flick
4) Second movie - usually an older classic flick. These were movies like Abbot and Costello meet the xxxxxxx.

A great way to spend a Saturday afternoon on just about 4 dollars that also bought up the local junk food.

Yes, yes, yes, it's definitely different times these days. I have no kids..... I can't even imagine what they do besides go tot he mall these days.

PRE-SCENES 2
03-08-2006, 05:37 PM
Definitely different times. These days, with kids pushing dope on the streets, you just can't be too careful when unsupervised. In my day, our local theater had a Saturday afternoon film festival. I went to the movies and got the following every Saturday afternoon when my mother dropped me and my friends off.:

1) Cartoon - usually Tom and Jerry
2) Serial - Flash Gordon, Buck Rogers or an episode from the Radarmen from the moon type stuff.
3) Main movie - Usually a current B SciFi or Horror flick
4) Second movie - usually an older classic flick. These were movies like Abbot and Costello meet the xxxxxxx.

A great way to spend a Saturday afternoon on just about 4 dollars that also bought up the local junk food.

Yes, yes, yes, it's definitely different times these days. I have no kids..... I can't even imagine what they do besides go tot he mall these days.

Man you brought back another memory!!!! :dude:
Saturday Matinees at the local theatre and 7-11 penny candy. WOW!
"The Lost Continent" with the Funky Scorpion and Giant Crab fighting and man-eating seaweed. But wait...that's for the Movies for Modelers forum! :cool:

P-S2

scotpens
03-08-2006, 10:56 PM
For me, it was the Saturday kiddie matinee at the Encino Theatre (yes, that Encino — the one mentioned in Moon Zappa's "Valley Girl.") A double feature, a cartoon, sometimes a short subject or two — all for 35 cents. Of course, the films weren't exactly first run — The Treasure of Pancho Villa and Beyond the Time Barrier! First Spaceship on Venus and Journey to the Seventh Planet!

BTW, growing up in the Valley wasn't even partially bitchin’.

AFILMDUDE
03-10-2006, 03:49 AM
I miss the drive-ins. In the entire Los Angeles County we've only got one left that is still operating...


http://img113.imageshack.us/img113/9610/driveintrain1nc.jpg

scotpens
03-10-2006, 05:04 AM
Whose bright idea was it to build a drive-in right next to a railroad track? How could anyone hear the sound with trains roaring by? Then again, judging by the young couple in the foreground, nobody was paying attention to the movie anyway.

Y3a
03-10-2006, 08:32 AM
Ah, yes... the famous O. Winston Link nighttime photo of "A" class 1242, a Norfolk and Wesern designed 2-6-6-4 high speed articulated freight loco. The automobile in the forground was Link's car. Willie Allen and Dorothy Christian were in the car. The drive-in was the Iaeger Drive-in. The Train was the 77-78 "Time Freight"

The photo was taken with a 4X5 camera with over 1000 flashbulbs and reflectors placed in the gully between the tracks and drive-in, and more, closer to illuminate the cars at the drive-in. Because the flash actually obscured the image on the screen, Link added one later. I Know...Too Much Info.....

John P
03-10-2006, 08:38 AM
*brain droppings* .....

:freak: !!!!!

Y3a
03-10-2006, 10:19 AM
Sorry! I can't help myself. I'm a member of the Norfolk & Western Historical Society, and a steam loco buff first and foremost - even over sci-fi! Even "Y3a" is a steam Loco designation for their 2-8-8-2 heavy articulated "mallet" type engines. By the way, you can't even get O. Winston Link's books anywhere except the Link Museum in Roanoke, VA.

http://photos.hobbytalk.com/data/509/medium/Y3.jpg

scotpens
03-10-2006, 12:20 PM
Sorry! I can't help myself. I'm a member of the Norfolk & Western Historical Society, and a steam loco buff first and foremost - even over sci-fi!"Loco" is definitely the right word! :p

John P
03-10-2006, 01:44 PM
Sorry! I can't help myself. I'm a member of the Norfolk & Western Historical Society, and a steam loco buff first and foremost - even over sci-fi! Even "Y3a" is a steam Loco designation for their 2-8-8-2 heavy articulated "mallet" type engines. By the way, you can't even get O. Winston Link's books anywhere except the Link Museum in Roanoke, VA.

http://photos.hobbytalk.com/data/509/medium/Y3.jpg

Dude! I have an O-gauge one that my great-grandfather scratch built from plans in a locomotive design book (which I also still have). You can see it onthe shelf at the bottom right of this picture:
http://www.inpayne.com/models/shelves/shelf_scifi.jpg

And here in its long-gone native habitat, my late Uncle Wally's basement yards:
http://inpayne.com/temp/rmc-yards.jpg (http://inpayne.com/temp/rmc-yards.jpg)

All these years I didn't even know what Y3a meant, much less that I had one!

Y3a
03-10-2006, 02:07 PM
YEPEROO!! Those are the outside pick-ups style of O scale popular in the early 1950's. Most of the "O" Scale equipment was made from simple kits that you detailed to heck out of. I see LOTS of Vanderbilt tenders so it was probably a western railroad he was modeling.

The ONLY Y3, Y3a class 2-8-8-2's were from the Norfolk and Western. LOTS of railroads had 2-6-6-2 and 2-8-8-2, and even a few 2-10-10-2 and 2-8-8-8-2 triplexes.

John P
03-10-2006, 02:31 PM
For the record, that railroad was built "from 1939 thru 1959" according to my Dad. It started out as a garden railroad, then was rebuilt indoors, then moved to another house years later. And you're looking at hand-laid brass track on scale ties with scale spikes, over real gravel :freak:.

Here's a shot of the original garden setup:
http://inpayne.com/temp/rmc-outside.jpg

And here's the other side of the loop on the opposite side of the basement:
http://inpayne.com/temp/rmc-town.jpg

There were yards on one end of the room, an oval around the town on the other end, then detailed runs on both sides of the room to connect them. There was a working powered drawbridge at the doorway! Damn, i miss that setup!