Just ordered my first 3D printer. - HobbyTalk
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post #1 of 31 (permalink) Old 03-24-2017, 07:28 PM Thread Starter
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Just ordered my first 3D printer.

Yea!!!!??????

Any pointers?
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post #2 of 31 (permalink) Old 03-24-2017, 08:59 PM
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Off the top of my head...

It will take time to tune the machine for the best results.

Not all plastics print the same, it may take some time to find the best one for you and your needs.

Machine-specific forums are your friends.

Not all models on Thingiverse are created equal.

Learn to multi-task as printing is SLOW.

Don't get discouraged. There's a learning curve to 3D printing that's steeper than you think.
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post #3 of 31 (permalink) Old 03-24-2017, 09:13 PM
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I think it probably matters to have the machine absolutely level. If you have a cat it's a REAL good idea to have a cover for the machine.

Keep expectations realistic.
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post #4 of 31 (permalink) Old 03-24-2017, 10:02 PM
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The only other thing I can add is research, research, research...

Once you pick a model, start out slow, pick a model and print it.
As you work out the bugs, print out the things that will help your printer.
For instance, my 3D printer uses a fan near the extruder.
Print out the fan nozzle for the fan and it will assist in the prints.
Then print out the other recommended parts for your model printer.

Good luck on your new 3D printer!

MagicBill
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post #5 of 31 (permalink) Old 03-24-2017, 10:25 PM
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Originally Posted by htmagic View Post
The only other thing I can add is research, research, research...

Once you pick a model, start out slow, pick a model and print it.
As you work out the bugs, print out the things that will help your printer.
For instance, my 3D printer uses a fan near the extruder.
Print out the fan nozzle for the fan and it will assist in the prints.
Then print out the other recommended parts for your model printer.

Good luck on your new 3D printer!

MagicBill
Ya know, it's things like this that make me smile. The technology and the community are such that you can actually print parts for the machine that make it better. What a fantastic world.
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post #6 of 31 (permalink) Old 03-25-2017, 12:05 AM
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I'd say take the time to learn what all the mechanical parts do, read any forums about what problems people have had with your model printer and how they fixed them. Check out what improvements people have tried and try them yourself.

And learn what all the advanced settings do in the slicing software, while you might get a good print now and again from generic settings you'll have better luck if you learn how to tweak all the various settings to get the best print for each object you are trying to make.

Have fun, it can be a frustrating hobby when things are not coming out well, but it's so cool when they do. It's especially cool if you know or learn how to use some CAD programs, to design something on the computer and then have a physical copy of it pop out of the machine is a lot of fun.
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post #7 of 31 (permalink) Old 03-27-2017, 01:51 AM Thread Starter
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Ya know, it's things like this that make me smile. The technology and the community are such that you can actually print parts for the machine that make it better. What a fantastic world.
This also could be the start of the end.
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post #8 of 31 (permalink) Old 03-27-2017, 08:50 AM
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Our friend Admiral Buck (Bill Kraus) got a basic 3D printer for his birthday. He excitedly set up a mesh of one of his TOS kitbashes to print in 1/2500. It came out looking like someone had tried to wind a handful of silly string into the shape of a starship. Here's where we see that basic home 3D printers are whatchacall "low res"!
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post #9 of 31 (permalink) Old 03-27-2017, 12:18 PM
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Micromark sells some goop that fills in the gaps in 3d printed material.
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post #10 of 31 (permalink) Old 03-27-2017, 02:33 PM
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Originally Posted by John P View Post
Our friend Admiral Buck (Bill Kraus) got a basic 3D printer for his birthday. He excitedly set up a mesh of one of his TOS kitbashes to print in 1/2500. It came out looking like someone had tried to wind a handful of silly string into the shape of a starship. Here's where we see that basic home 3D printers are whatchacall "low res"!
Because I am ignorant, I often try to find analogies or analogs to make discussion a little easier for the everyman to understand. It's not perfect but most anyone can grasp the key point.

What I've read the technical language of 3D printing is fairly obtuse and somewhat opaque. It may be my lacking of the necessary background.

I tend to think home 3D printing is at the 'early inkjet printer' stage, the 300 dpi times. I understand that there are some home printers that I would think of as 'color inkjet printer' level. You can print 'pictures' but they're not 'photo quality'. I would call this the thousands of dpi level.

Very expensive industrial 3D printers seem to be at what I think of as 'color laser printer' stage, so tens of thousands dpi.

When home 3D printing reaches that 'tens of thousands dpi' level we'll see some very exciting things happen. The physical printing equivalence of AFFORDABLE 'photo quality' output will change the world in unexpected ways. Combine that with physical scanning that matches, and no out of production model kit need ever be lost to time. Imagine a project of non-destructively scanning old model kits, even if it's a 'glue bomb' that's carefully taken apart, and re-creating it with 3D printing. It could be an exact replica, or it could be improved for accuracy or detail or simply better fit.

What a remarkable potential.

Geeze! Can you IMAGINE? How about taking some of those 'box scale' kits from the '50s and '60s (Sci-Fi or otherwise, I'm thinking like old Aurora helicopter kits) and being able to re-size them to a 'normal' scale!

Here's a goofy one. Modify the Aurora Flying Sub kit to 1/72 scale, correct the assembly issues, modify the interior to reflect the actual set.

Here's the issue then. How does a model kit company survive? Well, one way would be to get ahead of the curve, scan kits they technically own even if they don't have the tooling and offer those files for sale for a minimal amount of money. There's no reason a 20 piece old Hawk airplane kit should cost $50. Maybe $5. But this makes too much sense, and the hobby industry will probably follow the book industry struggling model of charging near the same price for a digital book as the physical book.

And there will be much home scanning and trading of files.
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post #11 of 31 (permalink) Old 03-27-2017, 04:59 PM
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Let me expand on this just a bit from my own experience...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fozzie View Post
Off the top of my head...

It will take time to tune the machine for the best results.
Understand the limits of your machine and master them BEFORE you upgrade.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fozzie View Post
Not all plastics print the same, it may take some time to find the best one for you and your needs.
Understand that there are a lot of external factors that will cause issues as well like humidity, room temp, the temp in the print area, age of the filament, and believe it the color of the filament. Fozzie's statement is true! You can find a few companies that offer a print package for about $30 a month which gives you 2 rolls of filament plus samples to try. They are a cheap way to get used to a wide variety of filament, but you will end up with a lot of stuff you can't use. Once you identify a brand that works for you be aware that the quality can change from batch to batch, and from color. Take notes of settings and speed, infill for each roll till you find the average setting for the brand.



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Originally Posted by Fozzie View Post
Machine-specific forums are your friends.
I'm in 2 Folger Tech FT-5 groups on Facebook that are great. Join the groups or forums that are the most helpful and realize the forum on the manufacture's site might not be the best place

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fozzie View Post
Not all models on Thingiverse are created equal.
Soooo TRUE!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Fozzie View Post
Learn to multi-task as printing is SLOW.
Printing an item for a client now time till finished 3 days and a little short of 1 roll of filament. Plus side my cost $35 when finished payment of $350 coming my way

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fozzie View Post
Don't get discouraged. There's a learning curve to 3D printing that's steeper than you think.
Again master your machine before you modify or switch filament types as abs/pla/metal, wood filaments all have their own list of quirks to master as well.

My business partner and I have 4 3D printers from a small M3D up to the Folger Tech ft-5 and Rostok v1. Each has it's own personality and ways of doing things...it's sorta like raising kids.
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post #12 of 31 (permalink) Old 03-27-2017, 05:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve H View Post


Geeze! Can you IMAGINE? How about taking some of those 'box scale' kits from the '50s and '60s (Sci-Fi or otherwise, I'm thinking like old Aurora helicopter kits) and being able to re-size them to a 'normal' scale!

Here's a goofy one. Modify the Aurora Flying Sub kit to 1/72 scale, correct the assembly issues, modify the interior to reflect the actual set.
Like this Aurora Sealab...
https://grabcad.com/library/aurora-s...le-kit-parts-1

The scanning and printing of parts has been going on for a while in the studio scale modeling world and it is picking up speed as some doner kits have been modified, or reached $700+ on Ebay.
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post #13 of 31 (permalink) Old 03-28-2017, 04:32 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by swhite228 View Post
Let me expand on this just a bit from my own experience...
Understand the limits of your machine and master them BEFORE you upgrade.


Understand that there are a lot of external factors that will cause issues as well like humidity, room temp, the temp in the print area, age of the filament, and believe it the color of the filament. Fozzie's statement is true! You can find a few companies that offer a print package for about $30 a month which gives you 2 rolls of filament plus samples to try. They are a cheap way to get used to a wide variety of filament, but you will end up with a lot of stuff you can't use. Once you identify a brand that works for you be aware that the quality can change from batch to batch, and from color. Take notes of settings and speed, infill for each roll till you find the average setting for the brand.




I'm in 2 Folger Tech FT-5 groups on Facebook that are great. Join the groups or forums that are the most helpful and realize the forum on the manufacture's site might not be the best place


Soooo TRUE!




Printing an item for a client now time till finished 3 days and a little short of 1 roll of filament. Plus side my cost $35 when finished payment of $350 coming my way


Again master your machine before you modify or switch filament types as abs/pla/metal, wood filaments all have their own list of quirks to master as well.

My business partner and I have 4 3D printers from a small M3D up to the Folger Tech ft-5 and Rostok v1. Each has it's own personality and ways of doing things...it's sorta like raising kids.
As a former freelance 3d animator, multitasking was my middle name, I took lots of naps. The thing I have to resist is staring at the machine while it works.

Great tips there.
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post #14 of 31 (permalink) Old 03-28-2017, 05:02 PM
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Look up Thomas Sadladerer on youtube. He covers everything in 3D printer including modifications to the g-code for slicing your mesh into something that can print.
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post #15 of 31 (permalink) Old 03-28-2017, 07:15 PM Thread Starter
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It's here It's here It's here It's here, he screams in terror!
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